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Copy of WWII- US Social Adjustments

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by

Clyde Simkins

on 1 May 2014

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Transcript of Copy of WWII- US Social Adjustments

Manzanar
Zoot Suit Riot
March on Washington, DC
A Phillip Randolf
110,000 lost all their
used wool, which was to be saved for
Signed executive order 8802, making discrimination in arms industry illegal.
Signed an executive order forcing internment
Only those on the West Coast
MS St Louis
FDR
Blocked from entering the country
Fear of another attack on the West Coast
Not really a threat
$20,000
1/4 eventually died
A source of shame in the history of the US
950 refugees
attack on pearl harbor
The journey to Cuba was a joyous affair. The passengers aboard the St. Louis were “treated with contempt before they boarded, but once on the ship they were treated like privileged tourists.” [7] “Crew members treated the passengers well—Captain Schröder insisted on this. Elegantly clad stewards served foods that by 1939 had been rationed in Germany; there was a full-time nursemaid to care for small children when their parents sat to eat. There were dances and concerts, and the captain allowed passengers to hold Friday evening religious services in the dining room and even permitted them to throw a tablecloth over a plaster bust of Hitler that sat there. Children were given swimming lessons in the on-deck pool. Passengers felt that they were, in the words of Lothar Molton, a boy traveling with his parents, on 'a vacation cruise to freedom.'” [8] However, even with the excellent treatment of the crew and the attempted negotiations of Captain Schröder, the passengers could not feel anything but anxiety and distress when it was announced that they would not be allowed to enter Cuba
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