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Developing UnderstandingThrough Dynamic Media and Digital Storytelling

In-service presentation to AISMozambique MYP and DP teachers
by

Donna Spisso

on 27 October 2013

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Transcript of Developing UnderstandingThrough Dynamic Media and Digital Storytelling

Student population
500 students from 50 countries

Web: http://www.aism-moz.com/
Pre-school-grade 12
IB World school certified in PYP, MYP and DP
presented by Donna Spisso
ENDURING UNDERSTANDING:

Using dynamic media and providing opportunities for students to create digital stories are powerful ways to deliver content and develop higher order thinking in our students.
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:
we use them to guide inquiry for a given unit of study and/or time period. Curriculum is designed around these questions, which are often inter-disciplinary. They address the big picture and the reasons for studying a given topic. Generating essential questions is a collaborative effort between students and teacher. (Coalition of Essential Schools)
TASKS:

the projects we create that address the essential questions and develop the individual tasks supported by dynamic media that engage students in explaining, interpreting and applying and sharing their knowledge. (Royer and Royer).
WHAT DO WE MEAN BY “DYNAMIC MEDIA”?
Anything that moves (in a digital sense) such as video, audio, animation. It is not passive but interactive. With the advent of
Web 2.0
technology, the media have become even more user-friendly. Instead of merely “consuming” the media, this audience may now “talk back” to it, adding their own voice and ideas to blogs, wikis and web pages. It’s the difference between watching a video and creating one.
RSA ANIMATE:
Combines spoken narration with key points and hand-drawn graphics that, when finished, result in a mural representing the essence of the talk. (Good to use as a resource but hard to make yourself; however, some of my students have tried it with some success in their IOP for English Part 4)W
here Good Ideas Come From by Steve Johnson
PREZI:
(You're watching one right now!) A cloud-based cross between white boards and slides. Flash based Zoom feature on a single digital canvas. It imbeds video and is not linear like a Power Point. It draws attention to
key words
and
concepts
and reinforces their relationship through the “zoom.” (Anyone can use Prezi)
Future-proof your education
http://prezi.com/gsoot_1arnmk/future-proof-your-education/
FLASH
(animation tool developed by Adobe) (Good to use materials powered by Flash as a resource but there is a learning curve if you want to use it yourself.)
"A Study in Shades" by Robert Kendall
http://www.cortlandreview.com/features/00/04/kendall/index.htm
"A Study in Shades"
is a poem for two voices featuring the points of view of a father with Alzheimer’s and his daughter. An interplay between text and morphing graphics reflects the progress of this relationship. Students can write their own poem for multiple voices to explore different perspectives in any subject area.
WHAT IS DIGITAL STORYTELLING?
A short (3-5 minute) first person video-narrative created by combining recorded
voice,
still and moving
images,
and
music
or other sounds. Emphasis is on constructing a good story;
technology is introduced only when the script is in top shape
. (Center for Digital Storytelling).
SOCIAL SCIENCE
For Hosne Ara
http://www.storycenter.org/stories/

Acid throwing in Bangladesh and one journalist’s attempts to expose the problem; in the process his career is destroyed. TO
K: ethics, media, social problems, current history
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE
The Water Web
http://www.digitales.us/content/water-web

A student-conceived and produced public-service announcement about saving water made by fifth graders in Georgia.
Service Learning and Science.
WHY DYNAMIC MEDIA? A RATIONALE
Bloom's Tech-infused Taxonomy
Verbs
vs.
Nouns

Begin with learning, not with the tech tool. Define the
VERBS
(the learn
ING
and then identify the
NOUNS
(tech tools) that will best bring about that learning. VERBS stay the same
(skills)
but NOUNS change
(tools)
(Successful EdTech)
VERBS:
Find
ing
, shar
ing
and annotat
ing
good sources for a research presentation and formatting them properly in a Bibliography

NOUNS:
Use the online Web 2.0 D
IIGO
social bookmarking tool to collect sources (replaces notecards); Use
Easybib
or
BibMe t
o create the citation; use
Google docs
or
DIIGO
to share the completed assignment with the teacher.
ESCAPE
mere recounting of facts. The task is crucial; it is where understanding happens. The task makes or breaks the investigation. Teachers must design constructivist, problem-based activities. We learn by making knowledge from the inside out, not by knowledge being poured into our heads. The dynamic media supports student demonstration of understanding. (Royer and Royer)
See Biome sample rubric on handout for a very simple "escape" project.
Explain
critical concepts through examples original to the learner
Select
a
ppropriate content from a larger body of knowledge in a purposeful manner
Connect
i
deas
Apply
kn
owledge to previously held knowledge to develop a new product
Provide
anal
ysis of the importance of key concepts
Express
viewp
oints from different perspectives
1
2
3
4
We learn better in
SOCIAL
situations
(Royer and Royer); this includes teaching others (McCarthy).
5
Project-based learning
(PBL) fosters “increased motivation, increased problem solving ability, increased collaboration, and increased resource management skills” (Royer and Royer).
Technology enhances every level of Bloom’s Taxonomy, especially higher order thinking skills
The process:

Identify enduring understandings
Formulate essential questions
Create meaningful tasks
A PROCESS FOR DEVELOPING DST PROJECTS
INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
MYP/DP teachers may ask themselves:


GENERAL: Ho
w may the power of dynamic media help reinforce skills and concepts within discrete subject areas and between Areas of Interaction? What are the measureable qualities of a good digital story?


SPECIFIC:
Ho
w may the creation of a digital story help students express historical ideas through a creative and personal lens?

(AOI: English/Portuguese and Humanities)
DP ASSIGNMENT:
Construct a digital
story
that extends your knowledge of Alexandra Fuller’s writing style and subject matter in her memoir, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dog’s Tonight: an African Childhood.

Suggestions: construct a
Geographical Soulmate story
on a place you love; get inspiration from “place” passages in Dogs. OR Write a
chapter of your memoir
in which you adapt specific aspects of Fuller’s writing style to your own.

See hard copy
RUBRIC
for this assignment.
MYP ASSIGNMENT:
Construct a digital story based on
interviews
with a parent, relative or other adult who experienced first-hand
a significant historical event.
STORY ELEMENTS AND PROCESS
(refer to hard copy handouts)


Seven Elements of Digital Storytelling:
POV, dramatic question, emotional content, voice, soundtrack, economy (just enough images) and pacing (Lambert)


Visual Portrait of a Story
(Jason Ohler as quoted in DST )


The DST 6-step Process
(Jakes, Capturing Stories)

•Digital storytelling done "right":
non-literal use of visual images, utilizes Creative Commons Attribution imagery from Flickr, length is appropriate, original music is original, comments on a worthy topic, and is distributed world-wide on YouTube with moderated commenting. (Jakes, DST 2.0 what’s Next)
My Own Digital Story

MYP assignment (interview)

A Christmas Memory: Bastogne 1944
SERVICE LEARNING
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS

•How may the power of dynamic media encourage AISM students to inspire others, establish connections with like-minded international students and
increase participation
in service learning activities in the surrounding
community
?

•How may digital storytelling help
raise consciousness
about community needs, and, through publishing our work, promote service learning at our school?

•How may our use of dynamic media contribute to the mission of
GISS
(Global Issues Service Summit) through sharing our work with other students in Africa and around the world?
Bridges to Understanding: Gallery of Digital Stories
(http://www.bridgesweb.org/projects/gallery-public.html)
Women Empowerment (South Africa)
Process:
form teams in each SL group who will be responsible for telling the story of their activity in a compelling, reflective narrative supported by high quality images and audio. These digital stories will be shared with the AISM community and (ideally) with other schools in Africa and the world.
Rubric for Service Learning
digital story (hard copy)
RESOURCES AT AISM AND ONLINE

Software:
iMovie. PhotoStory 3, Audacity, Windows Movie Maker, Power Point, Keynote, iPhoto, Garage Band, Quicktime Player, Pages (iPad), iBook AuthorWeb

2.0 Digital Storytelling Tools
(see https://sites.google.com/site/21stcentteachinglearning/digital-storytelling/web-20-digital-storytelling-tools )
Includes such Web. 20 tools as Voicethread, Animoto, StopMotion, Common Craft., FrameByFrame etc.

iPad apps:
ShowMe! (good for reflections and other metacognitive activities)

AISM Social Bookmarkers:
our own internal DIIGO Group for sharing bookmarks: http://groups.diigo.com/group/aism-social-bookmarkersCreative Commons http://creativecommons.org/
HOW DOES DYNAMIC MEDIA AND DST SUPPORT STANDARDS?


CONTENT:

Reading, Writing and Arithmetic (3 Rs) +

21st CENTURY SKILLS:
4 Cs:
Critical thinking and problem solving
Communication
Collaboration
Creativity and innovation

(The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age)
ISTE-NETS addressed with DST (red= addressed)

1.Creativity and Innovation
(English/Humanities projects)
Students demonstrate creative thinking, construct knowledge, and develop innovative products and processes using technology. Students:
a.apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products, or processes.
b.create original works as a means of personal or group expression.
c.use models and simulations to explore complex systems and issues.
d.identify trends and forecast possibilities.

2.Communication and Collaboration
(Service learning)
Students use digital media and environments to communicate and work collaboratively, including at a distance, to support individual learning and contribute to the learning of others.
Students:
a.interact, collaborate, and publish with peers, experts, or others employing a variety of digital environments and media.
b.communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
c.develop cultural understanding and global awareness by engaging with learners of other cultures.
d.contribute to project teams to produce original works or solve problems.

3.Research and Information Fluency
(SL and E/H projects)
Students apply digital tools to gather, evaluate, and use information.
Students:
a.plan strategies to guide inquiry.
b.locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize, and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
c.evaluate and select information sources and digital tools based on the appropriateness to specific tasks.
d.process data and report results.

4.Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, and Decision Making
(Service Learning)
Students use critical thinking skills to plan and conduct research, manage projects, solve problems, and make informed decisions using appropriate digital tools and resources.
Students:
a.identify and define authentic problems and significant questions for investigation.
b.plan and manage activities to develop a solution or complete a project.
c.collect and analyze data to identify solutions and/or make informed decisions.
d.use multiple processes and diverse perspectives to explore alternative solutions.

5.Digital Citizenship
(SL and E/H projects)
Students understand human, cultural, and societal issues related to technology and practice legal and ethical behavior. Students:
a.advocate and practice safe, legal, and responsible use of information and technology.
b.exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning, and productivity.
c.demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning.
d.exhibit leadership for digital citizenship.

6.Technology Operations and Concepts
(SL and E/H projects)
Students demonstrate a sound understanding of technology concepts, systems, and operations.
Students:
a. understand and use technology systems.
b.select and use applications effectively and productively.
c.troubleshoot systems and applications.
d.transfer current knowledge to learning of new technologies.

AISM Curriculum Standards:

TECHNOLOGY: AISM adheres to the ISTE-NETS
MYP and DP Subject Guides and Curriculum maps
WORKS CITED

Al Amin, Z. (2010). For Hosne Ara. CDS: Stories. Center for Digital Storytelling. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.storycenter.org/stories/

Andersen, M. H. (August 25, 2010) Future-Proof Your Education by Maria Andersen on Prezi. Prezi - The Zooming Presentation Editor. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://prezi.com/gsoot_1arnmk/future-proof-your-education/

Bridges to Understanding. (2007-2010). Bridges to Understanding: Gallery of Digital Stories. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.bridgesweb.org/projects/gallery-public.html

Center for Digital Storytelling. (n.d.). Center for Digital Storytelling. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.storycenter.org/index1.html
Creative Commons. (2001). Creative Commons. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://creativecommons.org/

Cushman, K. (n.d.). Asking the Essential Questions: Curriculum Development. Coalition of Essential Schools. Retrieved February 22, 2012, from http://www.essentialschools.org/resources/122

ISTE. (2007) NETS Student Standards, Books, Journals and Professional Development for Teachers. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.iste.org/standards/nets-for-students/nets-student-standards-2007.aspx

Jakes, D. (n.d.). Capturing Stories, Capturing Lives; an Introduction to Digital Storytelling. Jakes Online. Retrieved February 20, 2012, from http://www.jakesonline.org/dstory_ice.pdf

Jakes, D. (2009). Digital Storytelling What's Next? Jakes Online. Retrieved February 23, 2012, from http://www.jakesonline.org/dst2.html Johnson, Steven. (Sept 17, 2010) Where Good Ideas Come From. YouTube. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NugRZGDbPFU&feature=related

Kendall, R. (April 2000) A Study in Shades. The Cortland Review. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.cortlandreview.com/features/00/04/kendall/index.htm

Lambert, J. (n.d.). Digital Storytelling Cookbook and Travelling Companion. Story Center. Retrieved February 7, 2012, from http://www.storycenter.org/cookbook.pdf

Levine, Alan. (February 25, 2010) "50+ Web 2.0 Ways to Tell a Story." 50+ Web 2.0 Ways to Tell a Story. Retrieved 25 Feb. 2012 from http://50ways.wikispaces.com/

Lichelle Leonard: Bloom's Pyramid Interactive. (n.d.). Rockvale Elementary School. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.res.rcs.k12.tn.us/teachers/leonardl/blooms_pyramid.html

Marzano, R. J., Pickering, D. J., & Pollock, J. E. (n.d.). Technology in Education. Mrs. King's BioWeb. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://mrskingsbioweb.com/technology.htm

McCarthy, Andrew (2012) eLearnig and Economics. Blog. Retrieved Mar. 15, 2012 from http://ajmccarthynz.wordpress.com/professional-background/

New, J. (2005) How to Use Digital Storytelling in Your Classroom | Edutopia. K-12 Education & Learning Innovations with Proven Strategies that Work | Edutopia. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.edutopia.org/use-digital-storytelling-classroom

Ohler, J. (n.d.). Digital storytelling: A tradition renewed for classroom use . Division of Information Technology (DoIT) | UW–Madison. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.doit.wisc.edu/news/story.aspx?filename=1125

Ohler, J. (March 2009). Orchestrating the media Collage. Educational Leadership. Retrieved March 2, 2012 from http://www.pbs.org/moodle/file.php/3382/docs/tech345_orchestrating_the_media_collage.pdf

Royer, J., & Royer, R. (April 2002). Developing Understanding with Multi-media. Learning and Leading with Technology. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~rdroyer/necc/L&Lmedia.pdf

The Future of Learning Institutions in a Digital Age. (2009) John D. and Catherine T. Macarthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning. Retrieved February 17, 2012, from http://mitpress.mit.edu/books/chapters/Future_of_Learning.pdf

The Partnership for 21st Century Skills. (n.d.). The Partnership for 21st Century Skills. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.p21.org/

The Water Web | Digitales. (n.d.). Home | Digitales. Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://www.digitales.us/content/water-web

Vanides, J. Successful EdTech: First the Verbs, then the Nouns. (Aug 24 2009) The HP Blog Hub.Retrieved February 24, 2012, from http://h30507.www3.hp.com/t5/Teaching-Learning-amp-Technology/Successful-EdTech-First-the-Verbs-then-the-Nouns/ba-p/78574

Web 2.0 Digital Storytelling Tools. (n.d.) 21st Century Learning. Retrieved February 11, 2012, from https://sites.google.com/site/21stcentteachinglearning/digital-storytelling/web-20-digital-storytelling-tools
all photos (except for AISM logo) by or owned by Donna Spisso
Through Dynamic Media
and Digital Storytelling
Developing Understanding
We will examine some
essential questions
in the context of the sample assignments I have suggested for MYP, DP and Service Learning.

How can the use of digital storytelling and dynamic media promote the development of
understanding
in the classroom?
How can digital storytelling and dynamic media
be integrated
into the classroom in order to promote understanding?
How can the use of digital storytelling and dynamic media enhance the

IB Curriculum?
EXAMPLES: English/History (MYP) and English (DP)
How can the use of digital storytelling and dynamic media promote the development of understanding
outside the classroom
, particularly in
service learning?
EXAMPLE: greater involvement in the local community and Mozambique in the pursuit of authentic service learning work.
But first--some definitions
Some examples of dynamic media
Examples of dynamic media
Examples of dynamic media
And finally. . .
Example of a digital story
Another example of a digital story
WHY
WHY
WHY
E S C A P E
WHY
WHY
Process
Process (example)
Process (example 2)
Process
Beyond the Classroom
Beyond the classroom
Beyond the classroom (example)
Beyond the classroom
Where do I start?
MEETING STANDARDS
For more information
The Media Collage

New media (web 2.0) demand new literacies; these come together as a multi-media "collage" to tell a single story (Ohler).

REAL WORLD EXAMPLE
: "The Three Little Pigs" told twice, first as conventional TV news coverage and second as a "collage" in which the public uses social media to interact directly with TV journalists to report breaking news (Feb. 29, 2012).

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2012/feb/29/guardian-tv-ad-open-journalism?intcmp=239
6
Thanks for listening!
all photos taken in Kruger Park,
South Africa, by Donna
Full transcript