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The Harlem Renaissance

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Jared Williams

on 9 April 2013

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Transcript of The Harlem Renaissance

Takes on The Harlem "Renaissance" Nikki Giovanni, American writer, commentator, activist, and educator, believes that "Renaissance" is a terrible word to describe the flowering of black culture during this time period. She says "'Renaissance' is actually a very unusual term to use for the flowering of the arts in Harlem between 1917 to 1935. To say there is a renaissance is to say that there is a rebirth or a re-flowering, and there would be certainly those who would question, well, where was the original flowering?"
What Giovanni is saying, in simpler words, is the reason "Renaissance" is a terrible word to describe the flowering of black culture is because it is just that: A FLOWERING. A BIRTH. Not a continuation. Before here and now blacks were not recognized for their talents in the arts. What is known today as professional Africana philosophy has its roots in the search of identity undertaken by black writers in the late 1800s and early 1900s and culminated in the emergence of, on the one hand, a civil rights movement, which sought to remedy the evils of social segregation, political disfranchisement, economic exploitation, and cultural discrimination of the balck people of America, Africa and elsewhere, and, on the other hand, a literary movement whose aim was, in the words of the Kenyan philosopher D. A. Masolo, "to rehabilitate the image of the black man wherever he was" through "the expression of black personality" (D. A. Masolo, African Philosophy in Search of Identity. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1994, p. 10). The members of this literary movement, which came later to be known as the Harlem Renaissance in America and the Negritude sought to refute the unfounded assumptions of the eurocentrism and many others who saw in reason a trait unique to the Anglo-Saxon male thinker. In short, the Harlem Renaissance was a universalist movement whose form was poetry and whose content was pluralism. Philosophical Purpose in the Media The Harlem Renaissance Jared Williams and Daviah Riley The Harlem Renaissance The Harlem Renaissance, also known as the Black Literary Renaissance and The New Negro Movement, refers to the flowering of Black cultural and intellectual life during the 1920s and 1930s that began in Harlem, N.Y, and spread nationwide. A General Take This particular Era in Black History was a time period that was sensual, intangible, inspirational, and intellectual. A cultural burst of colors, sounds, and scenery that lasted from 1917 to 1935. A time period that for the first time Blacks were recognized in the general public, respected, and even revered. Poets, Play Writes, Actors and Actresses, and probably most popular in the musical department. Nikki Giovanni's take Significance in The
Movement Inspiration Literary Styling of the Harlem Renaissance Influential individuals of the Harlem Renaissance A presentation by: Citations Information
"Harlem Renaissance." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013.

"Harlem Renaissance - Philosophy Home." Harlem Renaissance - Philosophy Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2013.

Kuehner, Karen. The Harlem Renaissance. [Evanston, Ill.]: Nextext, 2001. Print.

"STYLE, FOCUS, THEMES." Literature. N.p., 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013.

"The Artists' Influences: Â Why Literature Changed During the Harlem Renaissance." Harlem Renaissance. N.p., 23 Oct. 2002. Web. 07 Feb. 2013.

"Writers and Poets - The Harlem Renaissance." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013.

"Why Was the Harlem Renaissance Significant?" WikiAnswers. Answers, 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013. Harlem Renaissance writers would express their thoughts in many ways, such as Langston Hughes who would use the rhythms of African American music into his poems of ghetto life. Other writers would use the structure of blues songs in poetry with repetition. Other styles included Claude McKay, who made use of sonnets to attack racial violence. In the writing of the Harlem Renaissance authors, there was no agreement of the usage of black or rural dialect. Some would use it to an extent, and others would use it thoroughly. For example, Zora Neale Hurston fully used it in "Their Eyes Were Watching God." The purpose of the dialect is to reflect the atmosphere and tone of the language in the black culture. Overall, Harlem Renaissance writers focused on one main topic, but expressed it in several forms and styles. As the African-Americans began to centralize and form strong communities, their art culture began to flourish. African-Americans were publishing vast amounts of literature, producing record numbers of paintings and sculptures, and participating in music, drama, and dance. Overall, the Harlem Renaissance proved to be a monumental turning point for African-Americans as they began to work “with a new sense of confidence and purpose…and a sense of achievement never before experienced by so many black artists in the long, troubled history of the peoples of African descent in North America” Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes is one of the most well-known names of the Harlem Renaissance. He was a writer.
He wrote novels, plays, short stories, children`s books, translations ,and anthologies.
His writing reflected the idea that black culture should be celebrated, because it is just as valueable as white culture.
He advocated many of these beliefs in his pieces.He spent majority of his life wring great literature,which is appreciated by ALL races,to this day. Zora Neale Hurston
Hurston was primarily a novelist.
Her writing reflected on her experience,interests & the culture of the town in which she grew up.
Hurston is associated with two places: Harlem & Eatonville Florida where most of her center work came from. Jessie Fauset
Jessie Fauset was another prominent female of the Harlem Renaissance.
Her writing included essays and work as literary editor for the NAACP journal "The Crisis".
She also tackled issues like interracial relationships.Fauset often depicted upper-middle class African Americans. Pictures
"Jessie Redmon Fauset." Harlem Renassiance Women Writers. WPMU DEV -The WordPress Experts, 2013. Web. 08 Feb. 2013.
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"Poets.org Guide to Langston Hughes- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More." Poets.org Guide to Langston Hughes- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More. Academy of American Poets, 1997. Web. 08 Feb. 2013.

"Zora Neale Hurston Biography." Bio.com. A&E Networks Television, 1996. Web. 08 Feb. 2013. The Harlem Renaissance was significant because it gave African American people and other people of African descent, a new and improved status in the society. Because they made wonderful contributions of new kind of literature in the world. It is significant because for once, though still separtated and segregated, blacks were revered, adored, respecteded. . "Harlem Renaissance." Dictionary.com. Dictionary.com, 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013. Kuehner, Karen. The Harlem Renaissance. [Evanston, Ill.]: Nextext, 2001. Print. "STYLE, FOCUS, THEMES." Literature. N.p., 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013. "Writers and Poets - The Harlem Renaissance." The Harlem Renaissance. N.p., 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013. "Why Was the Harlem Renaissance Significant?" WikiAnswers. Answers, 2013. Web. 07 Feb. 2013. "Harlem Renaissance - Philosophy Home." Harlem Renaissance - Philosophy Home. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. Hurston, Zora Neale. Their Eyes Were Watching God: A Novel. New York: Perennial Library, 1990. Print. Test Questions What did society pull from this era and it's leaders ?? Do you feel that you have learned anything ?? Why did this era occur ?? What Is The Harlem Renaissance ?? How did this presentation influence you ??
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