Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Introductory Paragraphs 101

No description
by

Jessica Scaggs

on 14 September 2017

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Introductory Paragraphs 101

Do NOT....
Open with a rhetorical question (Ex: "What makes
Of Mice and Men
such a classic novel?")
General Reminders
Don't use any quotes or textual evidence in your introduction -- your intro should be ONLY your own words.
Limit the supporting details in your introduction -- save this for the body paragraphs.
3-5 Main Sentences
Hook your reader with a thought-provoking opener.
Introduce the theme or big idea that is guiding your essay.
Introduce the focus text(s) for your essay and how it relates to your theme/big idea.
State your thesis or position on the topic.
Focus Text
The focus text (novel, play, short story, etc.) that is guiding your essay needs to be introduced somewhere in your introductory paragraph, whether it is immediately or after you've established the theme. Make sure to correctly punctuate and capitalize the title, specify the genre, and give the author's full name. Make it clear how this work relates to your main idea or theme.
Introductory Paragraphs 101

Step 1: Opening Hook
Open with a thought-provoking statement. Consider the following angles:
Pop culture reference/reference to film or music (Ex: "Countless contemporary works, like the
Dark Knight
film trilogy, prove that the literary 'hero's journey' is timeless.")

Related interesting fact (Ex: "J.D. Salinger's
The Catcher in the Rye
remains one of the most banned books of all time.")

Historical reference (Ex: "Harper Lee's
To Kill a Mockingbird
parallels the experiences of the Scottsboro boys in 1931.")
State the Theme/Big Picture
Once you've established your opening line, introduce the theme or main idea that is guiding your essay. Be sure to incorporate a transition that blends your opening line into the main idea of your essay.

Ex: J.D. Salinger's
The Catcher in the Rye
remains one of the most banned books of all time. The most contentious aspect of this novel is Holden's resistance to adulthood, which he conveys through strong tone and diction.
Thesis Statement
Conclude your introductory paragraph by stating your position on the topic. This statement should be clear and concise; after reading your introductory paragraph, there should be no doubt in your reader's mind what your argument is and how you might support it.

Ex: Holden's use of the word "phony" and his biting commentary about others in
The Catcher in the Rye
most clearly illustrates his awareness of the world's harsh realities, which leads to his ultimate isolation.
Example Intro
J.D. Salinger's
The Catcher in the Rye
remains one of the most banned books of all time. The most contentious aspect of this novel is Holden's resistance to adulthood, which he conveys through strong tone and diction. Holden's use of the word "phony" and his biting commentary about others in
The Catcher in the Rye
most clearly illustrates his awareness of the world's harsh realities, which leads to his ultimate isolation.
Address your reader directly (Ex: "Hey you! I'm going to tell you about the characteristics of a persuasive essay.")
State your opinion or experience (Ex: "To me,
The Odyssey
is the greatest story ever told.")
Ms. Scaggs
Full transcript