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SPC 1017 Informative Speech

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Megan Tomei-Jameson

on 8 September 2014

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Transcript of SPC 1017 Informative Speech

Getting through the maze of creating a speech
Informative Speech
Look for commonalities or obvious differences between the two points

Use themes that connect the two ideas
Transitions
"While most people are aware of the health benefits of oranges, a lesser known fruit is also very nutritious: the pomegranate."
Transitions
Organizational Structure
Example: Silent Films Ipod
Creating Transitions
Design speech to enhance learning and retention by:

Make it interesting

Keep it simple and easy to grasp

Remember previous knowledge
Purpose of Informing
Video
More Examples
"But if you're bored with the plain old orange and want something more exciting in your lunch box, check out another healthy fruit: the pomegranate."
"Orange is pretty, but if red is more your speed, try a pomegranate."
Construction of a Speech
First Point
Second Point
Commonality or Difference
Flavor Flav
Real Housewives of OC
Dora the Explorer
Disney's Brave
Bears
Lasagna
Group 1: Britney Spears

Group 2: The Office

Group 3: Jersey Shore

Group 4: Scar Face

Group 5: Exercise

Group 6: Puppies


Shouldn't be a laundry list of facts

No one will retain all information

Only focus on most important issues
Limit Information

“Many of you use Facebook on a regular basis to keep in contact with your social network. LinkedIn uses similar technology but instead of keeping in touch with your social network you can maintain a professional network”
Move from familiar to unfamiliar
Involve Listeners
Call for Participation

Try to get them to use their senses
Have them watch a clip
Pass something out for them to feel
Play music

Ask Questions
Remember to pause to give them time
Make sure that it is thought provoking
Poll Listeners

Make sure you have some idea of what the audience will say ahead of time

Refer to specific listeners

“Just the other day I heard Mark talking about what he would do if he won the lottery. Well, Mark, you may not win, but I can help you get more money by following these easy tips.”
Poll Listeners

Make sure you have some idea of what the audience will say ahead of time

Refer to specific listeners

“Just the other day I heard Mark talking about what he would do if he won the lottery. Well, Mark, you may not win, but I can help you get more money by following these easy tips.”
Poll Listeners

Make sure you have some idea of what the audience will say ahead of time

Refer to specific listeners

“Just the other day I heard Mark talking about what he would do if he won the lottery. Well, Mark, you may not win, but I can help you get more money by following these easy tips.”
Time: 4-6 minutes

Purpose: To inform the class in a “balanced and responsible” fashion on a topic of broader public significance. You want to tell us something we do not already know. Your topic does not need to be overly political, but it needs to be important.

Requirements: Outline and Three resources will be required along with a bibliography in MLA or APA format.
Informative Speech
Poll Listeners

Make sure you have some idea of what the audience will say ahead of time

Refer to specific listeners

“Just the other day I heard Mark talking about what he would do if he won the lottery. Well, Mark, you may not win, but I can help you get more money by following these easy tips.”
Poll Listeners

Make sure you have some idea of what the audience will say ahead of time

Refer to specific listeners

“Just the other day I heard Mark talking about what he would do if he won the lottery. Well, Mark, you may not win, but I can help you get more money by following these easy tips.”
The topic can make or break your speech. If it's not interesting, the audience won’t listen, and if you are not interested, it will show in your speech.
Inspiration:
Current events
Experiences
Interests/Hobbies
Passions
Beliefs
Misconceptions
Subject: a broad area of knowledge

Topic: narrower, subset of subject

Subject: Nursing

Topic: How the nursing shortage will negatively affect the medical field and patients
Subject vs. Topic
An informative topic must be:
Unbiased
Well Rounded
Creative
Fresh
Relevant
Current
Focused
Topic
Things to consider when coming up with a topic:
“So What?” Factor
Relevancy
Audience Knowledge
Fresh and creative approach
Topic
Remember to Use:
Easybib.com
Google Scholar
Google Books
Guess the Speech Topic
Informative Presentations
Informative vs. Persuasive
An informative topic must be:
Unbiased
Creative and Fresh
Relevant
Focused
Topic
For every topic you choose you need to think about your audience and ask:
Will they care?
Is this relevant for them?
- as
students
,
individuals
,
Americans
,
technology users
, ect.
Topic: So What Factor?
According to Toastmasters International, the best known public speaking organization, people learn when the information is:
relevant
relates to what they already know
involves them
clearly organized
presented in an interesting way
Repeated
involves visual aids
Having a Successful Speech
Aerobic exercise
Topics
Purpose Statement
Poll Listeners

Make sure you have some idea of what the audience will say ahead of time

Refer to specific listeners

“Just the other day I heard Mark talking about what he would do if he won the lottery. Well, Mark, you may not win, but I can help you get more money by following these easy tips.”
Capital punishment
Child labor laws
Cosmetic surgery
Obesity
Introductions
Informing About Objects
Explaining Heuristics
Explanatory: Fat in Foods
Explanatory: Breathing
Goals of the Introduction
Five Requirements of an Intro:
Intro
Needs to be
creative
and
short
Dogs, Phobias, Guitar, Dance,

STDs
Must give audience a good idea of your topic
Some materials you can use:
Videos
Quotes
Statistics
Jokes
Pop culture references
Props
Involving the audience
Attention Getter
Aristotle’s Ethos
Quotable Quote
Begin with a Value Step (Relevancy Statement)
Identify the Benefits
Not all audience members may be interested in your topic, so how do you make it clear that your topic is relevant to them?

Add a relevancy statement!!!!!!

This needs to be one or two sentences telling your audience why they should listen to you speech
Topic: Adding Relevancy
Speech Topic: BPA in plastic and water bottles
Most of us, if not all of us, use water bottles and plastic containers on a daily basis. Whether plastic is part of what you drink or eat, you should be aware of how the chemicals can affect you.
Relevancy Statement
Types of Supporting Material
Facts
Any piece of information that is verifiable

Statistics and findings by published research

This is the most credible form of supporting material but usually the least engaging

Be careful of being too factually dense
Supporting Material
Examples
Short illustrations that are judgments or interpretation of facts
Ex: Common Currency  use example of the Euro to make the abstract concept of common currency more understandable and relevant to audience
Narratives
Stories that represent or demonstrate
Personal anecdotes work, but don’t solely rely on them
Supporting Material
Testimony
Expert Testimony
 quote from expert in the field
Must cite who they are
For example “According to Dr. Smith, a researcher for the Cato Institute…”
Lay Testimony
 quote from non-expert
Should be used to get a “pulse” on a certain group
If you want to see how students feel about raises in tuition you can quote a student that best reflects how a majority of students feel
Quote the person and cite how they are relevant to the point you are making or how they are affected by the situation you are discussing
Supporting Material
Visual
Pictures can sometimes be the most effective way of supporting a point when words fail you

Can also be an object or prop

Make sure they help your speech rather than become a distraction
Supporting Material

Preview and Highlight.

Headline Your Visuals.

Exercise Restraint.

Choose Readable Type and Suitable Colors.

Use Appropriate Graphics
Powerpoint
PowerPoint Problems
THREE
pieces of
factual supporting material

TWO
pieces of some
OTHER form of supporting material

This could be a visual and an example or a narrative and testimony
Requirements for Speech
Speech: Unhealthy eating habits of college students
Visual: Bag of Doritos

Speech: Why not to drink bottled water

Visual: picture of landfill of bottled water or bring in lots of empty bottles

Speech: Bullying
Narrative: individual being bullied and how it impacted their life
Examples
Topic: Sleep Deprivation and College Students
Lay Testimony:
Who/What: College Students
Why: Show how common it is
Expert Testimony:
Who/What: Sleep expert
Why: Show how dangerous it is
Visual:
Who/What: Car accident
Why: Show impact of sleep deprivation
Different Ways to Use Supporting Material
Identify the Type of Supporting Material
Document Your Sources
Fact: According to the website, book, institute, ect.
According to MSNBC….
Narrative: Depends
If it is personal than you will state that it is something you experienced
If you read it from a source than quote the source the same way you would a fact
According to an article in the New York Times Mike Smith experienced a similar situation…..
Verbally Citing
Example: If it is something the audience will be aware of than it is not necessary to cite

Testimony: Cite the person and their credibility depending on which type of testimony it is (expert or lay)

Visual: cite where you got the picture from
This image is from the AP
Verbally Citing
Organizational Patterns
Supporting Material
Due Next Class
Turn in paper with:
Topic
Purpose Statement
Central Idea
Value Step

While you may not be going into the medical field, we all benefit from technological innovations for surgical tools. Who knows? maybe one day these developments may save your life or the life of a loved one.
Whether we've come home from the beach with sea lice, or gotten stung by a jellyfish in the ocean, many of have encountered a jellyfish, but you may not know the unique life cycle these creatures have and their contributions to science.
Speech Topic: Developments in surgical technology
Speech Topic: Different kinds of Jellyfish and their life cycles
Connectives
Goals of the Conclusion
Strategies for Concluding
Connections, Content
& Conclusions
Conclusion of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s, I Have a Dream speech
Match the Method of Concluding
Match the Method of Concluding
Generating Audience Interest
Adapt to Learning Styles
Involve Your Audience
Yoga poses you can do anywhere

Avoiding the flu

Women in combat

Cheap ways to have a fun date

Learning the basics of banking and investing

How changes to general Ed. Requirements affect you

Apple’s influence on technology and possible downfall

Best ways to stay healthy when busy and on a tight budget
Topics
Attention getter
This is a device that “hooks” your audience
Thesis Statement
Just like in an essay, this is covering the main idea of your speech
Ethos
Establish why the audience should listen to you as a speaker.
Relevancy (Value Step)
State why audience should be interested in speech
Preview
If not already stated in the thesis than make sure to let your audience what your points are
Explanatory: Fat in Foods

Explanatory: Breathing for Speech

Breaking Down the Topic

Identify the Benefits

Begin with a Value Step

Informatory Strategies

Purpose: What you want your audience to get from the speech

Central Idea: How you intend to achieve that purpose; the breakdown of the speech

Value Step/Relevancy Statement: Why should the audience listen
Full transcript