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AQA Foundation English Language GCSE Reading Paper

A reminder of the technique needed for each question

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Transcript of AQA Foundation English Language GCSE Reading Paper

In Sport Relief 2010
uses the Sport Relief logo based on the recognisable Red Nose
the colour red is mirrored in the subheading ‘Rise to the Challenge’ and is also used to highlight which page of the menu we are on and in the boy’s costume. This links to mention of the red and white theme in the text
the subheading ‘the training ground’ links sport with school and is presented in multi colours
a sky blue and white is used as the background with shapes implying clouds
Each activity title has a fun icon attached to it to appeal to younger people –the zig zag line uses an arrow to indicate which page the reader is currently on
There are pictures of children on the webpage, male and female, black and white, in costume and in uniform, perhaps to show how everyone is invited to take part. The costume looks fun and imaginative.
The text is presented in a soft grey on white background with blue subheadings. This is less harsh than a black font and has less of a demanding feel. There is lots of white space so that the information is not dense but emphasises the short punchy structure of the paragraphs and sub headings.
Separate boxes are used at the bottom of the page to provide key information and links. Two use graphics to illustrate but the middle section uses a photograph of a real project at work with Sport Relief funds, and pictures school age children similar to the boy in fancy dress. Make a list of presentational devices:
Logo
Headline
Subheading
Type of fonts
Size of font
Use of colour
Pictures
Text boxes
Bullet points
You will probably write about pictures, font and colour.

Annotate your texts for these devices
Find three devices to compare Question 4: Before you look at the text Make a list of
Presentational devices that I would expect to find Question 4: Before you look at the text 4. Now look again at Source 1 and Source 3. Compare the way that both texts use presentational features for effect.

Remember to:
write about the way the sources are presented
explain the effect of the presentational features
compare the way they look.

(12 marks)


clear evidence that the texts are understood in relation to presentational features
clear comparison of presentational features
clear analysis of/developed comment on the effect of the presentational features in both texts
relevant and appropriate examples of presentational features Question 4 4. Now look again at Source 1 and Source 3. Compare the way that both texts use presentational features for effect.

Remember to:
write about the way the sources are presented
explain the effect of the presentational features
compare the way they look.

(12 marks) Question 4 Give one mark for each Point, Evidence (which needs a quote) Explanation up to a maximum of 10. At least one quote needs to be developed for 11/12. Candidates’ responses may include:
 imperatives, commands, instructional language: ‘Make a hedgehog home.’ ‘Offer your local hedgehog…’, ‘Cut a hole…’ to suggest to the reader what they could be doing to protect hedgehogs/to guide them in how to make the home/to give precise instructions.
 sequencing: ‘Get these…’, ‘Next….’, ‘Then…’ to aid instruction.
 alliteration: ‘Top hedgehog tips’, ‘Helping hedgehogs....’ used in the subtitles to be catchy, create a rhythm and draw the reader to the subsections as well as ‘declining drastically’ which focusses the reader on why you should help to protect hedgehogs.
 direct address: ‘you’, ‘your’ includes the reader and helps to create an informal, chatty tone.
 adjectives/noun phrases to describe different conditions: ‘a cold wind’, ‘a wild and quiet area’, ‘dry leaves’, soft things for their feet’.
 lists of three are used to provide added information for the reader such as what hedgehogs like to eat: ‘insects, slugs and snails’ or where the box should be placed ‘alongside a fence, bank or wall’.
 listing is also used to inform the reader of what is required to build the house.
 there is vocabulary connected with the natural world: ‘garden, hibernation, habitat.’ Question 3
clear evidence that the texts are understood in relation to language features
clear analysis of/developed comment on the effect of words and phrases
supports response with relevant quotations
clear focus on language features Question 3 Make a list of...
Facts
Statistics
Clear, direct style
Proper Nouns (naming specific things like London and Jupiter)
Examples
Rhetorical questions
Pattern of three
Lists
Discourse markers e.g. Furthermore
Imperatives
Superlatives
Direct address
Alliteration Devices Give one mark for each feeling (which needs a quote); one mark for each inference Candidates’ responses may include:

 that his home sounds like a large place out in the countryside: ‘Collingwood House… towering oak and silver birch trees’.

 it sounds like it is an old place that is in a poor state of repair: ‘ramshackle buildings… a hundred years old… deeply rotten’.

 that in some ways it is like a dream come true: ‘starry-eyed’.

 that Steve’s childhood home housed many animals and this is maybe where his love of animals came from: ‘our first rescue animal… hide-and-seek with the goats’.

 that his home was also a habitat for lots of wildlife and that Steve was very happy exploring here: ‘the woods were my retreat’.

 the house was important to Steve and still is: ‘Collingwood House will always be my home.’ Question 2 Explain what you learn about Steve’s childhood home.
Remember to:
show your understanding of the text by explaining in your own words
support your ideas with the text.

One problem was that he got seriously injured. ‘I smashed my cartilage’. This is a problem because he would need to run quickly in different directions in order to play football.

You need to find four things that we learn and make inferences about each. Question 2 Explain what you learn about Steve’s childhood home.
Remember to:
show your understanding of the text by explaining in your own words
support your ideas with the text.

You need to:
Refer to the question
Quote
Infer meaning

This is just a more difficult version of 1b Question 2 Now read Source 2, from Steve Backshall’s Looking for Adventure where he describes his childhood home.
2. Explain what you learn about Steve’s childhood home.
Remember to:
show your understanding of the text by explaining in your own words
support your ideas with the text. Question 2 1b What do you understand about how the ladybird spider is being saved from extinction?
Remember to:
- show your understanding by using your own words
- support your ideas with the text.

You need to:
Refer to the question
Quote
Infer meaning

e.g. One feeling is that swimming is important to her: ‘swimming also comes first’. This suggests that she prioritises it even though she has other commitments.

You need to find 2 points and make inferences about each Question 1b 1b What do you understand about how the ladybird spider is being saved from extinction?
Remember to:
- show your understanding by using your own words
- support your ideas with the text. Question 1b There is no need for quotation, copying or attempting to use inferences in Question 1a. 1 (a) List four things you learn about ladybird spiders. (4 marks)

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............................................................................................................................... Question 1a Reading Paper
1. A) 4 marks (6 mins)
1. B) 4 marks (6 mins)
2. 8 marks (12 mins)
3. 12 marks (18 mins)
4. 12 marks (18 mins) Timings 135 minutes; 80 marks
= Approx 1.5 mins per mark

Reading the paper= 15
Answering reading questions = 60
Writing Paper = 60 Timings (Summer) To understand the techniques required for the foundation tier of the reading paper

Unit One: Understanding and Producing non- fiction texts Objective In Cool in the Pool!
the traditional Daily Mail logo is reduced to Mail and placed alongside Online in a more modern font
The headline Cool in the Pool! uses an exclamatory and a rhyme. It uses the pun ‘making a splash’ to refer to her swimming
The intro paragraph in bold gives the context for the interview
The interview is structured in a Question and Answer format using the girls’ initials after the first Q and A
Questions are presented in a bold font to separate them visually from the answers
The two colour photographs show the two sides to Rachael Latham – as a professional swimmer in her kit, with a look of determination and as a typical student, casually dressed, in her bedroom to help make a connection – possibly with younger readers One way that the writers of the ‘Animal Aid’ advert appeal to their audience is through variety of font.
For example, the first four lines of the article are bolder and larger than the majority of the rest of the article.
This is because the essential facts are given in this paragraph. The target audience – animal lovers ignorant of the plight of the hens – would be willing to read on if they feel that the cause is emotive.
The ‘J17’ article also uses font for effect.
For example, the words 'Rock Steady' are not very steady at all.
The way these words are set out are fun, chaotic and rebellious: this would appeal to a young audience who may be attracted to this style. Comparative P. E. E. Now read Source 3, Make a hedgehog home.
3. How does the writer use language features in the leaflet?

Remember to:
give some examples of language features
explain the effects. (12 marks)


Make a list of devices that could be used in a non fiction text Question 3 Question 1 b will indicate that what is required is: statement + supporting quotation + inference, as a basic formula. Students tend to do two out of three of those things and gain on average with 2 or 3 marks. By making two statements about the ways the spider is being saved, supporting them with a sensible choice of two quotations and showing understanding with two inferences, however simple, more able students achieved the full four marks. Candidates’ responses may include:
the spiders are being saved in plastic bottles. You would not think that placing spiders inside bottles would help to save them.
the plastic bottles are filled with natural things, implying that the conservationists are trying to make the spiders feel they are in their natural habitat.
the fact that the spiders can crawl out in their own time implies that the conservationists are very protective of the existing spider population and careful in the way they introduce them to new places.
the spiders were counted and conservationists recorded there were only 56 and have now worked to increase their numbers to 1000. Question 1b Give one mark to each of the following possible answers up to a maximum of 4: Indicative Content:

 ladybird spiders are one of the most colourful in Britain/the UK
 in the 1990s only 56 were left
 there are now more than 1000
 it is the rarest spider in Britain/the UK
 its new home is in Dorset
 they are being transported in plastic bottles
 the males have bright red bodies with small black spots
 ladybird spiders live in a hole in the ground Question 1a One way that the writer informs the reader is by using a list. For example, ‘Socks for schools order form; Sponsorship Form’. The language is simple and clear so that both children and adults can access the text quickly. In particular, naming ‘parents’ and ‘children’ directs people to the information most relevant for them.

Find Four language features How does the writer use language features in the leaflet?

Remember to:
give some examples of language features
explain the effects. (12 marks) Question 3
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