Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Reading Nonfiction

No description
by

Lise Mittag

on 1 February 2016

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Reading Nonfiction

Reading Nonfiction
What Makes Nonfiction Text Different from
Fiction?
Nonfiction uses facts to make up a form
Fictions is the art of making up facts

Nonfiction writing is made up of components, or parts, that are quite different from those that make up fiction.

When we are familiar with the components of both nonfiction and fiction, we can better understand what we are reading. Also, knowing these components helps us organize our own writing when we compose our own stories or factual pieces.

Nonfiction is usually written with specific, or specialized, text features and text structures. These text structures usually include helpful text cues or signal words. In contrast, fiction usually has a text structure made up of a beginning, middle and end.

Another difference is nonfiction often includes specialized vocabulary, whereas fiction does not.


TEXT FEATURES of Nonfiction

Text features have an impact on how nonfiction text looks on the page and are important to guide us in reading through the text. This is a list of common text features:










Subheadings
Bullets
Fonts
White space
Layout
Charts Diagrams
Labels
Pictures
Captions
Unlike nonfiction, the appearance of fiction, or the way it looks, is not quite as important. However, illustrations are sometimes used as part of the idea development.
Look through the first several chapters of "No Easy Walk to Freedom."
List an example of each
text features
you find in this novel have? List each feature that you notice and identify the page number where you found it.




Text structure of nonfiction refers to the organization patterns used within the text. Writers use text cues or signal words to help us figure out those organizational patterns – see explanation that follows.

In contrast, text structure of fiction includes literary elements such us characterization, setting, plot, and theme, as well as organizational devices such as foreshadowing and flashback.

TEXT STRUCTURE and
TEXT CUES/SIGNAL WORDS
Text features determine how nonfiction
text looks

Text structure determines how ideas are
organized




In order to find out important information when reading nonfiction, it helps to identify the text structure, i.e., how ideas have been developed and organized within the text.

COMMON TEXT STRUCTURES:
Cause and effect
Problem and solution Question and answer Compare and contrast Description
Sequence or time order Exemplification (using examples)
Combination of the above

Text Structure, Idea Development, and Organization
CAUSE AND EFFECT – Why something happens is the cause. What happens because of the cause is the effect.

Signal Words
Because
Since
Therefore
Consequently
This led to
So that
Nevertheless
Accordingly
If...then
Thus
COMPARE AND CONTRAST – a comparison tells how things, people, places or events are alike. A contrast tells how they are different.
Signal Words
However
Like
Unlike
Both
Although
Unless
Similarly
Too

As well as
On the other hand
Not only...but also
Either..or while
Yet
Nevertheless
Whereas
As opposed to
QUESTION AND ANSWER – the author asks a question and then gives an answer.

Signal Words
How
When
What
Where
Why
How many

The best estimate
It could be that
One may conclude
Content Objective:
TLW analyze how the structure of a text contributes to its meaning and style.
Language Objective:
I will reread text. I will write responses to questions I generated based on text features.
Subheadings
bullets
fonts
white space
layouts
charts
diagrams
labels
pictures
captions


Charts
Diagrams
Subheadings
Labels
Text Features which are not present in "No Easy Walk..."
Text Features
Writers of nonfiction usually have one of the
following purposes for writing:
• To explain
• To inform
• To teach how to do something
• To express an opinion
• To persuade readers to do or believe something
• To entertain

Understanding an
Author's Purpose
Sometimes the writer may have more than one purpose in mind when writing a particular piece. However, one purpose is usually the most important. What do you think was the author's purpose for writing the story Medicine Bag? Why would an author write an article about how to build a robot? Why would an author write a thirty second ad for the super bowl? Why would an author write the important steps to making a peanut butter sandwhich?

Author's Purpose
Types of Nonfiction
Letters
Articles
Speeches
Brochures

Biographies
Essays
Editorials
Academic Journals
All of the
facts
and
details
make up the description part of nonfiction writing. There aren’t any specific text cues/signal words. Strong description depends on sensory details.

Description
Sensory details are what we:
See
Taste
Smell
hear
Feel
All of the facts are arranged in a special sequence or are listed in chronological or time order

Sequence or Time Order
On (date) Not long after Now
As Before After When Since

Until
First Following
At the same time
Finally During
At last
Exemplification
When the author uses examples to explain or elaborate an idea.
For instance
In fact Specifically
To illustrate Such as
For example

LIST, ENUMERATION
All of the facts/details are listed or enumerated

To begin with
First
Second
Next
Then
Finally
Last

Most important Also
In fact
For instance
For example

With
In front Beside Near
In addition

Generate a question for the text below in your Cornell Notes
What are some common text features and how are they used in Nonfiction?
Generate a question for the text below in your Cornell Notes
What are common text structures
What is cause and effect?
What is compare and contrast?
What is question and answer?
Describe the difference between fiction and nonfiction text.
Content Objective:
TLW analyze how the structure of a text contributes to its meaning and style.
Language Objective:
I will reread text. I will write responses to questions I generated based on text features.
TLW determine the authors purpose
in a text. Content Objective: I will read, write, and discuss information presented.
Be certain that you have completed your poem and it is printed or saved to a jump-drive or your student drive!
POEMS MUST BE COMPLETED AND TURNED IN TODAY!!
Content Objective: TLW analyze text for central ideas. TLW create questions. TLW analyze text for textual structures. Language Objective: I will listen to instructions. I will discuss conclusions. I will write a constructed response to text.

YOU WILL NEED YOUR BELL WORK NOTEBOOK.
Using your self-selected text or the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, construct a response in your independent reading journal to the following prompt:

Identify one possible theme or central idea that has emerged from the text. Identify the subject (or topic) and then describe what the author's message to the reader is about this topic. In your response include: The title and author of the text, what subject you have identified, and how the author uses characterization or elements of plot to develop the central idea.

Locate your text structure notes, clear your workspace of all except your notes and a pencil. With the people at your table, please review text structure and text feature
With the students at your table, describe what the difference between text structures and text features are
Bell work notebook needed
Full transcript