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Antimicrobial for food packaging

PPT
by

Mohamed Adel

on 8 January 2013

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Transcript of Antimicrobial for food packaging

Innovation of
a new
Food Pack Identify the product (Food) The ideal pack Ideal product Recognize the process of that product.

Identify the risk factors of that product (Co2, O2, Temperature, R.H, light, Sun rays,...).

What are the most susceptible micro-organisms (Bacteria, mold, fungi,...) ?

Current regulatory affairs for packing this product in US, Europe, and if possible Egypt.

Its current shelf life in Egypt and abroad.

Product cost, and if available the pack cost. Broad spectrum anti-microbial activity (anti-bacterial, ant-fungal,...).

Well defined barrier (O2, CO2, Ethylene, Temperature, R.H,...).

Concentration of the antimicrobial.

Mode of action of the antimicrobial.

Factors affecting the antimicrobial {interaction of AM and the film, interaction of AM and food (storage temp, PH, R.H,...)}.

Safe as food contact materials.

Either recyclable or bio-degradable.

The Anti-microbial does not make organo-leptic changes (Sensors).

$$ Cost Effective Pack $$ Reduce the growth rate of microorganisms.
Extend shelf life.
Maintain product quality and safety. Antimicrobial for active packaging Intelligent Packaging Active Packaging Types of antimicrobial packaging Anti-microbial Classification of Antimicrobials By Mohamed Adel Time-temperature
indicators (TTIs). Pathogen indicators. Freshness indicators. Leak Indicators (O2 and Co2 indicators) Radio frequency identification (RFID) Oxygen Scavengers Temperature control (Self heating and cooling) Antimicrobials Ethylene Scavengers Moisture control
Antimicrobial packaging can take several forms including:

1. Addition of sachetspads containing volatile antimicorbial agents into packages.
2. Incorporation of volatile and non-volatile antimicrobial agents directly into polymers.
3. Coating or adsorbing antimicrobials onto polymer surfaces (adsorption of Nisin on PE, EVA, PP, polyamide, PET, acrylics and PVC).
4. Immobilization of antimicrobials to polymers by ion or covalent linkages. (This type of immobilization requires the presence of functional groups on both the antimicrobial and the polymer.)
5. Use of polymers that are inherently antimicrobial. (such as chitosan and poly-L-lysine) Food packaging systems and relative behavior of active substances. The mass transfer phenomena of an active substance incorporated into a film or coating, with different applications. Han, J. H. (2000). Antimicrobial Food Packaging. Food Technology, 54(3), 56–65. A) Organic acids
Organic acids such as acetic, benzoic, lactic, tartaric, and propionic are used as preservative agents. B) Metals
Nanoscale levels of metal oxides such as magnesium oxide and zinc oxide are being explored as antimicrobial materials for use in food packaging. C) Spice-based essential oils
Spice-based essential oils have been studied for antimicrobial effects: for example, oregano oil in meat, mustard oil in bread, oregano, basil clove, carvacol, thymol, and cinnamon. E) Enzymes
such as lactoferrin, lactoperoxidase, and lysozyme. D) Bacteriocins
Such as Nisin , Reuterin and Natamycin. Antimicrobial activity in the vapour phase of a combination of cinnamon
and clove essential oils Microbiological effect of cinnamon essential oil contained in food packaging on Aspergillus flavus SEM images of control samples. A, B: General view, showing normal growth of non exposed A. flavus. Many hyphae are seen covering the whole surface. C, D, E: Details of a hypha and conidiophore. The hyphae feature a tubular shape and have spherical, fully-formed conidiophores at the tip. F: Detail of conidia covering the whole surface of the conidiophore and featuring characteristic spicules on the surface. SEM images of treated samples. A, B: Effect of 10 mL CIN on hyphae (A) and conidiophores (B). C, D: at 20 mL CIN, increased damage of the hyphae (C) and disrupted conidia (D) are appreciated. E, F: At 30 mL CIN, individual hyphae are indistinguishable and conidial growth is completely inhibited. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films containing cinnamon essential oil were tested in vapor phase, without direct contact with the mold. Active PET started showing activity at 2% CIN EO load and produced total inhibition at 4% CIN EO. The combined results demonstrate the effectiveness of cinnamon essential oil as antifungal compound, independently of the substrate from which it is delivered. In general, plastic films require much less CIN EO load than active paper to inhibit the mold, which might be explained by the differences in the coating or by the material itself (e.g. porosity) Manso, S., et al. "Combined Analytical and Microbiological Tools to Study the Effect on Aspergillus Flavus of Cinnamon Essential Oil Contained in Food Packaging." Food Control 30.2 (2013): 370. Print. Manso, S., et al. "Combined Analytical and Microbiological Tools to Study the Effect on Aspergillus Flavus of Cinnamon Essential Oil Contained in Food Packaging." Food Control 30.2 (2013): 370. Print. Manso, S., et al. "Combined Analytical and Microbiological Tools to Study the Effect on Aspergillus Flavus of Cinnamon Essential Oil Contained in Food Packaging." Food Control 30.2 (2013): 370. Print. Manso, S., et al. "Combined Analytical and Microbiological Tools to Study the Effect on Aspergillus Flavus of Cinnamon Essential Oil Contained in Food Packaging." Food Control 30.2 (2013): 370. Print. Goñi, P., et al. "Antimicrobial Activity in the Vapour Phase of a Combination of Cinnamon and Clove Essential Oils." Food Chemistry 116.4 (2009 The antimicrobial activity of the vapour generated by a combination of cinnamon and clove essential oils against the growth of four Gram-negative (Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Pseudomonas aeruoginosa and Salmonella choleraesuis) and four Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus cereus and Enterococcus faecalis) was assessed by means of the fractional inhibitory concentration index (FIC) of the mixture. The results showed that a synergistic effect could be achieved for some of the tested microorganisms, this effect being concentration-dependent. The experimental results also provide the first approach to developing an antimicrobial packaging with less active concentrations of the active essential oils. This fact is of paramount importance from the point of view of food safety and food organoleptic properties. Study results Thank You Antimicrobials in food packaging are used to enhance quality and safety by reducing surface contamination of processed food. Types of antimicrobial packaging
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