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Midterm - Six Traits Writing & Mini-lessons

Parts 1 & 2 of Midterm - LAE
by

lili cal

on 17 October 2012

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Transcript of Midterm - Six Traits Writing & Mini-lessons

As Explained By: Liliana Caldero Six Traits Writing Voice is that quality of a written work that make it
different than anyone else's work, making its author identifiable. It is a writer's unique style and personal touch. Voice Organization is how the written work is set up; the flow of ideas makes sense to the reader and creates a clearer message. Organization Word choice helps the writer to convey an intended meaning and to creatively communicate ideas to the reader. Word Choice Sentence fluency is defined by the way words are organized into a sentence. Poor sentence fluency can convolute the writer's ideas and make their work difficult to read. Sentence Fluency If conventions and organization ore the skin and bones of writing, Ideas are the heart. The effective communication of ideas will depend on the other traits of writing, but being proficient in those other traits cannot make up for lack of well thought out ideas. Ideas Conventions are sometimes made to be the main focus of writing by some teachers, and although they are important, conventions must not be mistaken for the purpose of writing. Communication of ideas is the main point of writing, but conventions help to make those ideas clear. Poor use of conventions can change the meaning of words entirely and thus change the ideas. Conventions Increasing Holistic Writing Scores Through Analytic
Mini-lessons. Mini-Lessons:Organization Florida Writes! Originally by Vicki Spandel 1







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6 Mini-Lessons:Voice Mini-Lessons:Word Choice Mini-Lessons:Sentence Fluency Mini-Lessons:Ideas Mini-Lessons:Conventions Holistic

vs.

Analytical The holistic model takes the
analytical pieces and sums them
up as a whole. By improving each
element, the whole is improved,
thus increasing holistic
scores on standardized state
writing tests. Now go make great writers! Voice is the only one of these six traits not judged on in Florida Writes! It is often overlooked in teaching writing, but is incredibly important; this is directly linked to its connection with word choice, organization, and sentence fluency. The writer's unique manipulation of these other traits can create a strong voice, affecting the overall tone of the written work. Voice can be tailored for a certain audience. Writing feels complete when it is organized well, having a beginning, middle, and end, or an intro, body, and conclusion. A surprise here and there can help the impact of the written work when organization leads the reader into it. A writer's ability to choose specific words for their meanings can alter to the tone of their writing and draw the reader in. Words can paint mental pictures for the reader, making ideas clearer and more interesting. can turn the reader off and cause the writer to lose credibility. An inappropriate voice for a written work After the writer chooses their words, they must organize them in a way that flows and makes their ideas clear. Poor word choice can result in poor sentence fluency. Even when writers have right-fit words, they still must put them together in a way that is understandable to their specific audience. After organizing ideas into specific words, and words into flowing sentences, the next step in writing is organizing those sentences into paragraphs, and those paragraphs into a paper. Idea generation is the first step to great writing. The idea(s) must be established before writing begins because they will be the main focus of the writing. Conventions refer to the correct application of the rules of Standard English spelling, punctuation, capitalization, and grammar and usage. SYMS - [Stories You Might Start] MASP - Morphological Approach to Story Plotting Wordless Picturebook Movie Music Binoculars - Question Focus Ideas in Songs This narrative tool helps writers take it one sentence
at a time by asking them to simply come up with a character name, character age, a place, and a time of day.
The first sentence must REVEAL character name and a place, the second reveals age and time of time. From there, the character must tell the story. This approach asks students to generate a random list of interesting characters, a list of interesting places, and a list of any kind of problem. Students may choose one item from each list and mix them into a story. Using a wordless picturebook, students can come up with
ideas about what the story is about, and even write their own story to accompany the pictures. Have students listen to the musical scores of different kinds of movies and write certain kinds of stories based on the music. Discuss how writing can make readers ask questions.
Read a book and stop after each page, having students wonder aloud about the story. Give students a starter sentence and have them generate a list of questions that sentence makes them think of, then have them write a story with that sentence, keeping these questions in mind. Have students listen to different songs and identify the main ideas in them. Portrait Writing Sheer Excitement Moody Weather Sense Chart It's in the Details Lingering Mood In one developed paragraph, students will describe the essence/ personality of someone they know and like very much. Students write a first person paragraph about the weather today and how it makes them feel. They will observe and think about what it looks like outside and the mood it puts them in. Students will describe the mood in a room or another place right after people have just left it as if they are peeking at it through a crack in the wall, unseen. This could be a dining room, classroom, theater, place of worship, anywhere. What does the room look like and feel like at the moment when it is empty; peaceful, eery, stirred up? Students should use similes. Students explore ways that details create images in the reader's mind. After reading a paragraph from Harper Lee's "How to Kill a Mockingbird", students will record metaphors and similes they found and practice writing their own to describe things around them. As a class or individually, students can choose a topic and brainstorm sights, sounds, smells, feelings, and tastes that they associate with that topic, and then use some of their ideas to write a poem or short story. Students will write about the most exiting thing that ever happened to them (or make something up) and they will choose words that really convey how exciting it was so that the reader will feel excited too. First students can practice alter 'tell sentences' to make them 'show sentences', and then they will practice this in their own writing. Variety is the Spice of Life Playing with Sentences Dialogue with Sentence Focus Picture Search Beautiful Dreamer What a Pig! This exercise plays with literal and figurative meanings and has students investigate the figurative meanings after reading the literal meanings. Students will create some of their own figurative meanings. Students will listen to Martin Luther King's famous speech and with the refrain "I have a dream" and then without it, and discuss what different it makes. Students will then think about what they hope for the for their future or for the world and will write a series of paragraphs that begin with "I dream" or "I sometimes dream". Students will look for figurative language in a passage of text and sort it into categories of simile, metaphor, or personification. Students are given a passage with three common mistakes: unnecessary repetition of key nouns, sentences that are all the same length, and flat language. Students will discuss what is wrong with the passage and be explicitly directed to rewrite the paragraph using fewer words, and then rewrite their new paragraph to make it more interesting. Students are given examples of a 'when/then' sentence, a sentence beginning with 'to', and a sentence with a strong sense of contrast. After reading each the students will each write their own sentence that imitates the examples. Students will write a dialogue between two very different people; one who speaks in long sentences, and one who speaks in short sentences. The characters will have an argument, and by the end of the story, the argument should be resolved. Strong Finishes Many Beginnings Blueprint for the Future Halloween Reflection Home Sweet Home In Order The teacher will give the students a selection of intriguing sentence starters to choose from and students will practice writing an introduction. Students will practice writing a strong concluding sentence. Students will be introduced to transitions such as, "In conclusion," and "In light of this evidence," and they will write a paragraph describing how they feel about a 'new' fictional homework policy requiring at least six hours of homework every weekend. Students will write two sharply focused paragraphs about the place where they live; one about the outside environment, and one about the inside environment. This can be done in tandem with a sense chart. These two paragraphs be linked together using transitions. Using a worksheet, students will unscramble the order in which sentences should go that have been extracted and reordered from two pieces of writing. Students should sort them into columns A and B, and decide what the topic sentence and concluding sentences are for each group. On a separate piece of paper students will put the paragraphs together again, paying attention to the flow of logic and viewing transitions as clues. In a five paragraph essay students will discuss the merits of three kinds of candy or favorite snacks. The body of the paper will devote a full paragraph to a description of each kind of candy, using their five senses. In the conclusion, the student should identify which kind of candy is the best. Students will write a five paragraph essay about something that they believe needs improvement. They will propose changes. They could write about something in their hometown, school, in a sport, in a food, a store, something on television. They should use what they've learned about brainstorming topics before writing an outline and writing. Stream of Consciousness Same Theme, Different Reader Confess! OurTown Happiness Is... My Story Students will hear a story with strong voice, such as "The True Story of the Three Little Pigs" by Jon Sciezka, and discuss what makes the voice sound like the wolf's voice. Students will discuss how they know it's the wolf talking, and discuss the wolf's audience and word choice. Ask students to write a sentence on their own describing what they think happiness is, and what they think sadness is (encourage use of similes, metaphors, and personification). Ask students to share and record their responses on a T Chart for the class to see, then compare and contrast the student answers. Make sure they understand that although they all wrote about the same subject, they all described it a different way, and that's voice. Students will use a formal voice (not first person), to state an opinion about why their town/city/area/neighborhood, is a good or bad place to live. They will back up their opinion with examples. The students will write a first person narrative about
a character who confesses to doing something. It can be a major crime or a minor crime. It can be humorous or dramatic. Students will write about anything on their mind until told to stop, not worrying about paragraphing, spelling, or grammar. They willwritee as quickly as they can, trying to get every thought on paper. If students get stuck, tell them to keep repeating their last word in their mind until a new image or thought comes. Some prompts may be "I always remember," "I hate," "Yesterday I dreamt about...". This is to free them from structured writing and help them experience idea generation and language in a new way. Students will experiment with diction by writing about the same topic in two ways, in two paragraphs, for two different audiences. The first paragraph they should use formal diction, and the second they should use informal diction. They can describe something they have done recently. First, the teacher should read some sentences and have class discussion about which sentences are formal and which are colloquial. Bottoms Up! Capital Letters Search Twenty Odd Ducks Eats, Shoots, and Leaves Verb Charades Adjective Art Students will understand that adjectives describe nouns with this memorable activity. Students will choose noun at random, and then choose a fun adjective from a bag, and the students will create a picture of that adjective noun combination. A sentence will be provided for the class with several verbs missing. A student will be picked one at a time to choose a secret word to fill it in, the teacher will know the word, the student will act it out and the class will guess. Repeat with more students until the sentence is finished. Verbs are what you do. Students will listen to the story "Eats, Shoots, and Leaves" by Lynne Truss and then after class discussion, they will have pictures photocopies from the book and sentences to accompany them and they will try to fill in the punctuation to fit the picture. The teacher will read "Twenty Odd Ducks" by Lynne Truss to the students and the class will discuss what punctuation is for and why it's important. Students will go through a newspaper or some text and find the capital letters. The class will come together and discuss why those words had capital letters. Students will read a paper of theirs from the bottom, up, to better find errors. F-CAT Spandel Holistic Writing is focused, purposeful, reflects insight into writing situation. The paper conveys a sense of completeness with adherence to main idea. Support is specific, relevant, concrete, and/or illustrative. The paper demonstrates a commitment to and an involvement with the subject, clarity in presentation of ideas, and may use creative writing strategies appropriate to the purpose of the paper. The writing demonstrates a mature command of language (word choice) with freshness of expression. Sentence structure is varied, and sentences are complete except when fragments are use purposefully. Few, if any, convention errors occur in mechanics, usage, and puncuation. Ideas Focus Completeness/ Organization Word Choice Both F-CAT and Spandel stress that ideas should be clear and should be the main focus of the writing. Organization will give writing that sense of completeness, as Spandel notes that the writing has a clear start, middle, and ending. Word choice is important
to conveying that the writer knows what they are talking about, and it writers used it in details and to make the reader feel they are involved in the subject matter. Score:
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