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The Civil War

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Xavier Willis

on 23 January 2013

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Transcript of The Civil War

Slavery SOUTH NORTH Death toll The End of The Civil War The Battle Of Shiloh 618,222 people died during the course of the civil war The Civil War was a war fought from 1861 to 1865 between the United States The south felt as if slavery was a part of their life and culture, and because they grew up with slaves they figured it was okay to own slaves. The north, however, thought slavery was wrong and should be illegal. Both ideas were so strong that both sides fought and died over the idea. Both sides used the bible and other proof that slavery was either good or evil.
On Sunday morning, April 6, 1862, General Ulysses S. Grant sat enjoying a leisurely breakfast below Pittsburg Landing on the Tennessee River, while his army cooked breakfast in the camps grouped about Shiloh church not far away. Nobody expected trouble from the retreating Confederate forces under Gen. Albert S. Johnston that were supposed to be camped at Corinth 20 miles away. Grant had not kept cavalry watching the Confederates, nor had he posted outposts sufficiently far in front.

Suddenly the crack of rifles and roar of battle broke the calm. When Grant reached his troops, his situation looked disastrous. The Confederates in full force had burst from covering woods and were driving the desperately resisting bands of Union soldiers from their camps. All day the battle raged with terrific losses. Practically no control could be exercised by either commander over his raw troops. By night the Union troops had been driven almost to the river.

The situation changed overnight... Before the Union finally took over Vicksburg, the South won one of its greatest victories in the Civil War in May 1863 at Chancellorsville, Va. General Lee achieved perhaps his most brilliant success in this battle. At the start of the battle, Lee had about 60,000 men in a region east of Chancellorsville and south of Fredericksburg.

Fighting came to a halt at nightfall.

During the night Lee decided to attempt an encircling movement. He ordered Stonewall Jackson to lead 30,000 men around the southern flank of the Union army. General Jackson began the long march after midnight. In the morning the Confederates were seen by the Federals guarding the southern flank of the Union army. The Federals attacked but did not seriously hamper Jackson's march. a major battle. Battle Of Chancellorsville By May 11, 1865, nearly everyone in the United States and in the moribund Confederacy considered the Civil War over. Both of the South's principal armies had capitulated. Lieutenant General Richard Taylor had surrendered most of the remaining Confederate forces east of the Mississippi. President Jefferson Davis had just been captured, and his cabinet had scattered to escape Yankee vengeance. Even the elusive Confederate guerrilla William Quantrill had been fatally wounded. The Battle of Palmetto Ranch Finally, on April 18, 1865, the Civil War ended with the surrender of the Confederate army. 617,000 Americans had died in the war, approximately the same number as in all of America's other wars combined. Thousands had been injured. 360,222 people from the north 258,000 people from the south
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