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A CONCRETE IMAGE OF HOW SENTENCES WORK

7th grade CCGPS - Clauses
by

Tanya McLain

on 13 September 2016

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Transcript of A CONCRETE IMAGE OF HOW SENTENCES WORK

Here are three sentences:

He smiles.
Autumn leaves twirled gently to the ground.
The park district will open an outdoor ice skating rink in November.

Length does not determine
what is and is not
a sentence.

Regardless of how long or short a group of words is,
it needs two parts
to be a sentence
: a subject and a predicate.

The
subj
ect tells us
who or what
.
The
pred
icate tells us
what about it
.

2. SubJ: Pred:
Who

or what?

What about it?


He

smiles.

Autumn leaves

twirl gently to the ground.


The park district

will open an outdoor ice


skating rink in November.

These two parts
connect to form a basic sentence,
also known as an independent clause.
If the wheels represent the subject and predicate, then how can we expand the "wheels"?

By adding Adjectives
Old

magazines are stacked under the

kitchen

table.

The

weekend

seminar explains how to start a

small

business.


Meditation helps create a

peaceful

mind and

healthy

body.

By adding Adverbs
Airline employees worked
diligently
to reschedule our flights.

We
carefully
loaded the van with furniture.

The driver realized
immediately
that he had missed the exit.

We can also add prepositional phrases to expand sentences.

The windows rattled
in the winter storm
.

We loaded our hamburgers
with ketchup, mustard,and onion
.

Some car dealers make most
of their profit

on parts and services
.
Regardless of how much detail we add, the wheels give the same kind of information.

~The subject tells us who or what.
~The predicate tells us what about it.
Who or what?

What about it?

Randy

loves pizza.
Companies
benefit from customer loyalty.
Efficient train service
will decrease traffic congestion.
Comma Confusion...
Subjects and predicates connect directly.

Contrary to what you may have been told in elementary school, do not put a comma every time you take a breath.

**Do not separate subjects and predicates with a comma.
Incorrect:

Carlos and his family, showed me that honor is more important than winning.

Correct:

Carlos and his family showed me that honor is more important than winning.

How Sentences Work
Day Two:

Dependent Clauses (DC)

Dependent clauses
cannot work alone
. (They are like baskets that need to be attached to the bike.)
"like the basket on the bike"

The most common

(DC)
dependent clause
begins with a subordinating conjunction (SC).
(AWUBIS)
dependent clauses... (like a basket, they cannot get anywhere on their own...

DC's:
As soon as it stopped raining,
Because I registered early,
When we need a quiet place to study,

~Baskets can be placed on the front of a bike.


~just like a basket on a bike, DC 's

dependent clauses can be placed on the front of a sentence.
As soon as it stopped raining,
we saw a double rainbow.

Because I registered early,
I got the classes I wanted.

When we need a quiet place to study,
we go to the library.
Baskets can also be placed on the back of a bike.


Dependent clauses can also be placed at the end of the sentence.
We saw a double rainbow
as soon as it stopped raining
.

I got the classes I wanted
because I registered early
.

We go to the library
when we need a quiet place to study
.
More Dependent Clauses:

Another kind of dependent clause begins with
the relative pronouns who, which, and that.

who works part-time
which includes a swimming pool
that is parked in my driveway

These clauses are not sentences. They are like baskets that need to be attached to a bike.



Don't forget to have that basic Sentence Support:
Subject Wheel
Predicate Wheel
Regardless of what kind of "basket" we add,
we need an Independent Clause (IC) to support a (DC).

Bike wheels
(IC)
:
The new fitness center
will open in April.

Basket
(DC)
:
which includes a swimming pool

Bike with basket

(IC with DC interruptive)
:

The new fitness center,

which includes a swimming pool,
will open in April.
We can add a variety of
baskets
(dependent clauses)
on the front of the
bike

(independent clauses)
.

Earlier this spring
, the viaduct was closed because of flooding.

Eight months ago
, we bought a truck.

By the time we got home
, it was dark.

Irritable after a long day at work
, I took a nap before studying.

We can add a va
riety

of baskets to th
e front of
the bike.
We can add different
baskets

(DC)
i
n the middle of the
bike

(IC)
.

My little brother
,

who was unable to sleep
,
turned on the light.

The elderly couple
,

walking slowly up the driveway
,
waved at their grandchildren.

A modern art gallery
,

which was funded by a million dollar grant
,
is under construction.

James Jackson
,

a friend since grade school
,
is my math tutor.

A variety of
dependent clauses

(baskets)
can go on the back of the
sentences

(bike)
, too.

Jeff wants a hybrid,
his best hope for good gas mileage.

A gentle rain fell throughout the night,
lulling us to sleep.

We are building a home with Habitat for Humanity,
a national volunteer program.

Everyone wants to leave at noon,
even my sister.
Works Cited:

The slides are examples of the kind of instruction found in:

An Easy Guide to Writing
by Pamela Dykstra
Prentice Hall, 2006
ISBN: 0 -13 –184954 - 9

A few Subordinating Conjunctions:

1. As
2. After
A few Relative Pronouns
3. Although That
4. While Who/ whoever
5. When Whom/ whomever
6. Until Which/ whichever
7. Before
8. Because
9. If
10. Since
Clauses:

1. 2.












3. 4.













In your interactive notebook:

9/12 How sentences Work 26-27
27
The information in red goes in box 1.
All of this information goes in box 2.
3. Think of a simple sentence like a bike.








This information goes in box 3
Front wheel
is the subject
Back wheel
is the predicate
4. Add to expand sentences.

Add:
Adjectives:
ex.
Adverbs:
ex.
Prepositional phrases:
ex.

1. Length does not determine a sentence.


It needs two parts.



Subject: who or what

Predicate: what about it

26 How Sentences Work
2. Subj: Pred:
Who or what? what about it

He smiles
etc....


These two parts connect to form a basic sentence, also known as an independent clause.

3. Think of a simple sentence like a bike.







"Your bike picture"

4. Add to expand sentences.


Adjectives
Ex.

Adverbs
Ex.

Prepositional Phrases
Ex.


Baskets can be placed on the front, middle, or back of the bike.

Clauses, like baskets, can be placed in different locations.

Front:
ex. -

Middle:
ex. -

Back:
ex. -

The information goes in box 3.
This information goes in box 2.
This information goes in box 1.
Choose one sentence as for box 3 front example.
Choose one as your example for box 3, middle.
Information for top of box 4.
which was green
brown wicker
with leather straps
although it was full of fruit
with thick brown boards
because the black handle is thin
Stop here for today.


DC,IC
Need commas to separate the interruptives.
Choose one as your example for box 3, end.
*These have commas because they modify the predicate noun. Typically, DC's at the end of the sentence do not have commas.
Don't write these down... next slide has examples for IN.
Add to box 4:
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