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Gerunds

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by

Joseph Golden

on 10 February 2014

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Transcript of Gerunds

Gerunds & Gerund Phrases
Growing Your Knowledge of Verbals
Collecting tolls is the troll's favorite thing
What do these sentences have in common?
(Hint: Look closely at their subjects and direct objects.)
Write these down for your notes...
What is a gerund phrase?
Let's look at some examples...
Say what?
As writers, we use gerund phrases to express
what we like or do not like to do.
Why would I use a gerund phrase when I write?
Blowing down straw and stick houses is easy for the wolf.
Trying to get home was Odysseus' ten-year goal.
They all use gerunds and gerund phrases!
A group of words (NOT a complete sentence)
Acts like a noun (never any other part of speech)
Always begins with an -ing word (gerund) followed by a noun or prepositional phrase.
Can be the subject, direct object, or object of a preposition.
Gerund Phrase as Subject: "
Collecting
tolls
is the trolls favorite thing."

Gerund Phrase as Object of a Preposition: "Hercules worked hard
at

completing his twelve tasks
."


Gerund Phrase as Direct Object: "The elf
loved
painting pictures with sunbeams
."
"I like
writing stories
on my antique typewriter."
"I don't like
using ball point pens
when I write longhand."
Practice!
Directions: Circle the gerund phrase and label it as the subject, direct object, or the object of a preposition.
1. Looking into the the magic mirror is something the evil queen does daily.

2. The dwarf spent long hours digging beneath the surface of the earth.

3. The frog's favorite thing is submarining through still water.

4. The princess's bane was talking to telemarketers on the royal phone.

5. Foretelling the future was the fortune-teller's trade.
Creating Your Own Gerund Phrases
Some Basic Instructions
1. Think of verbs ending in -ing that can be nouns. (climbing, jumping, running, playing, staring, fleeing, etc.)

2. Think of nouns (people, places, things, or ideas) you associate with those -ing words (gerunds).

3. Write a sentence that uses your gerund followed by your chosen person or animal, and is followed by a linking verb. (Check your notes for a linking verb if you forgot what they are.)
"Running a marathon was something the ogre would never do."
Gerund Phrases as Direct Objects
Construct your own gerund phrase, and use it in a sentence as the receiver of the action verb of your sentence. Write three sentences using gerund phrases as direct objects.
"Harry Potter loved playing magical games."
Gerund Phrase as Objects of Prepositions
Construct your own gerund phrase, and use it in a sentence as the noun indicated by a prepostion. Write three sentences using gerund phrases as the object of prepositional phrases.
"Gnomes indulge in playing tricks on people."
"Hercules excelled at completing superhuman tasks."
"Baba Yaga disliked having unwelcome visitors."
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