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Free Response Breakdown

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by

Cody Swendro

on 30 January 2013

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Transcript of Free Response Breakdown

Foundation Drive Phase 1 Phase 2 Results Core Miranda V. Arizona Roots to Success Our work has yielded not only a grade-A FRQ, but a better understanding of the Fourteenth Amendment and how it applies to the decisions of the Supreme Court, as well as how these decisions affect us today. Cody, Noah, Katie, Jamie Brown V. Board of Education In 1966 Ernesto Miranda was identified by a witness for the kidnapping and rape of a 17 year old woman. He was interrogated by police officers 2 hours, and afterward signed a confession. After his confession was shown to the Jury, he was found guilty and sentenced for 20-30 years on each account. Brown v. Board was a suit brought against the Topeka Board of Education by thirteen African-American parents for the end of racial segregation in the Topeka school districts. In Brown v. Board, the Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation was unconstitutional, and school segregation violated the “equal protection clause” because it refused equal treatment to African Americans under the law. Many scholars and observers have argued that the ratification of the Fourteenth amendment to the Constitution has become the single most important act in all of United States politics.

Identify the provisions of the Fourteenth Amendment that were applied in one of the following Supreme Court cases. For the case you select, explain the significance of the decision in the United States politics:

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (1954)
and
Miranda v. Arizona (1966) Free response questions broken down into points. To get credit for all points, identify what it is asking. For each topic point, you must complete the following to maximize your points.

Describe: What is it?
Explain: How is it important?
Give an Example: What example is there to prove that you know what it is? The first section of the Fourteenth Amendment, known as the equal protection clause, was applied in the 1954 Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas (Brown v. Board). Brown v. Board was a suit brought against the Topeka Board of Education by thirteen African-American parents for the end of racial segregation in the Topeka school districts… The clause in Section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment guaranteed that no person, class, or group of people can be denied the same legal protection as others. According to the amendment, no state can make a law denying your rights, liberties, or equal protection. Describe Explain In Brown v. Board, the Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation was unconstitutional, and school segregation violated the “equal protection clause” because it refused equal treatment to African Americans under the law…Brown v. Board was a reversal of the Plessy v. Ferguson ruling, which stated that the principle “separate but equal” was equal despite the fact that it did not grant African Americans the same treatment as whites. Give an Example The ruling of Brown v. Board greatly improved the quality of life for African Americans and other minorities living in the United States in ways that still resonate today, (Example:) such as schools admitting people of all nationalities. (More significance:) The Supreme Court’s application of the Fourteenth Amendment allowed people of every race to truly have equal protection under the law. The due process clause of Section 1 of the Fourteenth Amendment was applied in the Miranda v. Arizona case in 1966. Miranda v. Arizona involved a man, Ernesto Miranda, who was arrested, interrogated by the police, and confessed to rape and kidnapping. Identify Explain At no point was he told of his rights to remain silent, have counsel present, or that his statements could be and would be used against him in court. Later, his lawyer argued that the confession was not voluntary, because the police used his previous statements to coerce the confession. Miranda appealed his confession to the US Supreme Court, who ruled all suspects must be advised of their rights in order for their confessions to be used to prosecute in criminal trials. Example The due process clause stipulates that no state can take away a citizen’s life, liberty or property without due process of law. Miranda v. Arizona was an application of the due process clause because Miranda’s conviction was eventually overturned. Its overturning was due to the fact that in gathering evidence, the police denied Miranda his due process. The significance of Miranda v. Arizona is that today no criminal suspect may be questioned without being read his or her “Miranda Rights;” for instance, if man is arrested for drunk driving, he must be read his Miranda rights before he is charged with a crime. Significance Explain Why do we want to know about this? Well, it helps us to better understand the constitution that governs our daily lives. The Constitution plays a part in many aspects of our life, and to better understand it will help to better understand how we are governed.
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