Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Teaching Lower Secondary Geography

No description
by

CHIH HAO YU

on 28 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Teaching Lower Secondary Geography

Geographical Inquiry and
Skills
Effective geography teacher knows what to teach: geographical content and the curriculum
Brief history of contemporary geography
Through geographical knowledge and understanding, students can become informed and responsible local-global citizen who embrace the global values such as equity, social justice, peace and intercultural understanding and sustainability. (Marsh & Hart, 2011, p. 246)
Geography is the study of the environments, populations, economies and communities of a place, including the consideration of how and why these places are changing. It teaches a way of investigating, evaluating and explaining the characteristics of the places that make up the world we live in (Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria, 2007; Mclnerney, Berg, Hutchinson, Maude, & Sorenson, 2009; NSW Department of Education and Training, 2010).
Where has contemporary geography come from?
WHAT does contemporary geography teaches?
An effective geography teacher...

Promotes inquiry-based learning and asks meaningful questions (Australian Geography Teachers' Association, 2010; Marsh & Hart, 2011)

Considers student diversities and uses a wide range of teaching approaches (IGU-CGE, 2006 as cited in Marsh & Hart, 2011 p. 255)

Improves himself constantly through reflection and professional development (Purnell, 2010)

Uses information and communication technologies (ICT) well (British Communication and Technology Agency, 2004)

Engages students (Walls, Richard,
Nardi, Minden, and Hoffman, 2002)
Teachers knowledge and information:
http://www.agta.asn.au/Resources/GeographicalEducation/geoged-v26-2013.php
http://www.geogspace.edu.au/
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Rationale

Online resources for maps and mapping skills:
Geography basics for teachers: http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/secondary/hsie/assets/new_teachers/teach_geography.pdf
Fundamentals of mapping: http://www.icsm.gov.au/mapping/index.html
Mapping tools: http://cooltoolsforschools.wikispaces.com/Mapping+Tools

Fieldwork:
Teacher's information and activity illustrations on fieldwork: http://www.geogspace.edu.au/support-units/fieldwork/fi-overview.html
Resource developed by the NSW Department of Education and Training's Centre for Learning Innovation (CLI): http://lrrpublic.cli.det.nsw.edu.au/lrrSecure/Sites/Web/about_fieldwork/index.htm

Geography images, videos, and activities:
http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/resources-gallery/resource-gallery.html
Geography video resource: http://www.gatm.org.uk/

Classroom activities:
Teaching sample videos: http://www.geogstandards.edu.au/index.php/samples
Global education: http://www.globaleducation.edu.au/resources-gallery/resource-gallery-teaching-activities.html
Australian Bureau of statistics activities: http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/CaSHome.nsf/Home/Year+9+Resources#geo

Case studies:
Asia case studies: http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/curriculum_resources/geography/geography_cr.html
Indonesia case studies and videos: http://www.worldvision.com.au/resources/SchoolResources/IndonesianResource.
$ Priceless!
Monday, February 17, 2014
Vol XCIII, No. 311
WHY is it important to study geography?
Effective teaching styles and strategies
Effective geography teacher knows
HOW
to teach

It equips students with important skills and competencies required in the work place and life (Mclnerney et al., 2009).
It helps the youths to understand Australia’s identity in the world and develop their national pride (Australian Academy of Science National Committee for Geography, 2007).
It helps the students to develop greater appreciation of various places and people around the world (Mclnerney et al., 2009).
It allows young people to have greater awareness of the important challenges facing our world (Australian Geography Teachers Association, 2013b).
It nurtures the next generation to be responsible global citizens in making wise decisions that have global impacts (Australian Academy of Science National Committee for Geography, 2007; Mclnerney et al., 2009).
It saves one from serious public embarrassment (Piotrowski, 2014)
Teaching Geography Today
Challenges in teaching
What issues teachers face in teaching Geography?
WHAT is contemporary geography?
Your Empowering Resource Guide
General
Skills
Values
Key Concepts
Geographical
Knowledge & Understanding
Geography contributes to value building in three dimensions
Citizenship
Develop a sense of responsibility for the world through self regulation and active actions
Stewardship
Appreciate sustainable interactions with the environment
Scholarship
Understanding of the Earth and its systems
Twenty First Century Skills Map (2010) as cited in Marsh and Hart (2011)
General skills mentioned by other authors:
Literacy
Numeracy
Graphicacy
Information and Communication Technology
Oracy
Australian Academy of Science National Committee for Geography (2007)
Mclnerney et al. (2009)
Creativity
Self-management
Intellectual understanding
Ethical behaviour
Indigenous perspective
Thinking skills:
critical thinking
problem solving
decision-making
Teamwork
Social
competence
Asia-Australia
connection
Inclusivity
Active and informed
citizenship
Place
The significance of places and their characteristics
Space
It entails the importance of location
and spatial distribution, including the ways people manage and organise them.
Environment
It is the significance of the physical environment
in human life, and the relationships between
humans and the environment.
Interconnection
Sustainability
It is the capability of the environment
in supporting human and other life forms into the future.
Key concepts
covered by the
Australian Curriculum
Geography
It emphasises that no object geographical study can be viewed on its own.
(Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority , 2014b)
Scale
It is about the way geographical phenomena and problems can be examined at various spatial levels.
Change
It is about investigating and explaining the development of geographical phenomena over time.
Places are earth surface and defined by people.
Places are important to us because it gives us security, sense of belonging, supports our living and influences our wellbeing and opportunities.
Human actions and environmental processes can change the environmental characteristics of places.
The human characteristics of places are affected by environmental characteristics, resources, relative location, connections with other places, culture economy, and the decision of people and organisations.
Places are created, managed and altered by people.
Each place is uniquely different and may need unique solutions to similar problems in different places. Similar environmental and socioeconomic processes may result in different outcomes in places.
The sustainability of places can be determined by factors such as natural hazards; climate change; economic, social and technological change; government decisions; conflict; exhaustion of a resource and environmental degradation.
The location of a place can determine its environmental and human characteristics, though its effects are lessened by transport and communication technology despite its unequal distribution.
The unique characteristics of places determine their spatial distributions that have environmental, economic, social and political consequences. Geographical understanding can be agained through analysing the spatial distributions of places.
People perceived, structure, organise and manage spaces which can be designed and redesigned to suit specific purposes.
The environment is shaped by geological, atmospheric, hydrological, geomorphic, edaphic (soil), biotic and human processes.
The environment supports all life forms by providing raw food, absorbing and recycling wastes, providing security and nurturing life and being a source of enjoyment and inspiration.
It provides opportunities and at the same time pose constrains on human settlement and economic prosperity. The limitations can be reduced by technology and human organisations but not eliminated.
Similar environments are perceived, adapted to and used differently subjecting to differences in culture, population density, type of economy, level of technology, values and environmental worldviews.
Manipulation of environmental changes demands for an understanding of the causes and consequences of change, and requires implementation of appropriate strategies identified through the application of geographical concepts and techniques.
Each type of environment consists of specific hazards which impact on people differently according to both natural and human factors. These impacts can be reduced to a certain extent by prevention, mitigation and preparedness.
Various places and the people and organisations in them are all interconnected, which in turn have profound influences on the characteristics of places and how they change.
Sets of cause-and-effect interconnections can be managed and organised between and within places as systems involving networks of interconnections through flows of matter, energy, information and actions.
Holistic geographical study involves examining the interconnections between phenomena and the processes taking place within and between places.
Sustainability is a goal as well as the mentality of reaching the goal.
Environmental sustainability requires efforts in maintaining or restoring the environmental functions that support all life forms and human wellbeing.
The causes of unsustainability can be studied by examining the environmental processes and human actions contributing to the degradation of the environmental functions. The attitudinal, demographic, social, economic and political causes of these human actions must also be considered. These can be studied through the framework of human–environment systems .
There are a variety of contested views on how progress towards sustainability should be achieved and these are often informed by worldviews such as stewardship.
Conclusions and relationships identified at a level may be different at another level. For instance, the cause of the loss of vegetation could be soil erosion at the local level but climate change at the global scale.
The cause and effect relationship can cross scales, such as, a local removal of vegetation can have global impacts.
Environmental change can take place over long and short period of time with interrelationships with human activities.
Environmental, economic, social and technological change take place unevenly, and have varying effect on places.
A study of current changes and the contributing processes can have useful implications in predicting changes in the future so as to generate measures necessary for a more sustainable future.
Year 7 Content descriptions (Quoted from Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014c):

Unit 1: Water in the world
The classification of environmental resources and the forms that water takes as a resource
The ways that flows of water connect places as it moves through the environment and the way this affects places
The quantity and variability of Australia’s water resources compared with those in other continents
The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa
The economic, cultural, spiritual and aesthetic value of water for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples and peoples of the Asia region
The causes, impacts and responses to an atmospheric or hydrological hazard

Unit 2: Place and liveability
The factors that influence the decisions people make about where to live and their perceptions of the liveability of places
The influence of accessibility to services and facilities on the liveability of places
The influence of environmental quality on the liveability of places
The influence of social connectedness, community identity and perceptions of crime and safety on the liveability of places
The strategies used to enhance the liveability of places, especially for young people, including examples from Australia and Europe

Further details can be found at:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10#level7
Year 8 Content Descriptions (Quoted from Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014c):

Unit 1: Landforms and landscapes
The different types of landscapes and their distinctive landform features
The aesthetic, cultural and spiritual value of landscapes and landforms for people, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples
The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform
The human causes and effects of landscape degradation
The ways of protecting significant landscapes
The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard

Unit 2: Changing nations
The causes and consequences of urbanisation, drawing on a study from Indonesia, or another country of the Asia region
The differences in urban concentration and urban settlement patterns between Australia and the United States of America, and their causes and consequences
The reasons for and effects of internal migration in Australia
The reasons for and effects of internal migration in China
The reasons for and effects of international migration in Australia
The management and planning of Australia’s urban future

Further details can be found at:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10#level8

Year 9 Content Description (
Quoted from Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014c
):

Unit 1: Biomes and food security
The distribution and characteristics of biomes as regions with distinctive climates, soils, vegetation and productivity
The human alteration of biomes to produce food, industrial materials and fibres, and the environmental effects of these alterations
The environmental, economic and technological factors that influence crop yields in Australia and across the world
The challenges to food production, including land and water degradation, shortage of fresh water, competing land uses, and climate change, for Australia and other areas of the world
The capacity of the world’s environments to sustainably feed the projected future population to achieve food security for Australia and the world

Unit 2: Geographies of interconnections
The perceptions people have of place, and how this influences their connections to different places
The way transportation and information and communication technologies are used to connect people to services, information and people in other places
The ways that places and people are interconnected with other places through trade in goods and services, at all scales
The effects of the production and consumption of goods on places and environments throughout the world and including a country from North-East Asia
The effects of people’s travel, recreational, cultural or leisure choices on places, and the implications for the future of these places

Further details can be found at:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10#level9

Year 10 Content Descriptions (
Quoted from Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014c
):

Unit 1: Environmental change and management
The human-induced environmental changes that challenge sustainability
The environmental worldviews of people and their implications for environmental management
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ approaches to custodial responsibility and environmental management in different regions of Australia
Select ONE of the following types of environment as the context for study: land, inland water, coast, marine or urban. A comparative study of examples selected from Australia and at least one other country should be included.
The application of human-environment systems thinking to understanding the causes and likely consequences of the environmental change being investigated
The application of geographical concepts and methods to the management of the environmental change being investigated
The application of environmental economic and social criteria in evaluating management responses to the change


Unit 2: Geographies of human wellbeing
The different ways of measuring and mapping human wellbeing and development, and how these can be applied to measure differences between places
The reasons for spatial variations between countries in selected indicators of human wellbeing
The issues affecting the development of places and their impact on human wellbeing, drawing on a study from a developing country or region in Africa, South America or the Pacific Islands
The reasons for and consequences of spatial variations in human wellbeing on a regional scale within India or another country of the Asia region
The reasons for and consequences of spatial variations in human wellbeing in Australia at the local scale
The role of international and national government and non-government organisations’ initiatives in improving human wellbeing in Australia and other countries

Further details can be found at:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10#level10
Geographical Knowledge
refers to the geographical facts, generalisations, principles, theories and models that has been developed in geography (Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014a).
It is dynamic, and its interpretation can be challenged as long as its is supported with evidence and reasonable arguments (Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014a)
Geographical Understanding
refers to the ability to discern the relationships between aspects of knowledge and be able to develop explanatory models to explain the relationships (Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014a).

A person with geographical understanding is able
to apply geographical knowledge to interpret new situations or solve problems (Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014a).

The specific knowledge and understanding in each year level shall be featured in the following presentations...
Geographical Inquiry
is the process of acquiring and deepening geographical understanding through investigations.

The process involves:
forming geographical questions
-->
data collection, evaluation, analysis and interpretation
-->
formulation of conclusions and recommendations.


Key geographical skills that students acquired are:
formulating a question and research plan
recording and data representation skills
using a variety of spatial technologies
communicating with appropriate geographical vocabulary (Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority , 2014a).

Specific geographical enquiry skills are also described in terms of the five stages of an complete investigation, namely:

1. Observing, questioning and planning
2. Collecting, recording, evaluating and representing
3. Interpreting, analysing and concluding
4. Communicating
5. Reflecting and responding
(Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority , 2014a)

Details of what the students are expected to learn in the Australian Curriculum Geography shall be presented as follows:
Geographical Skills
refers to the techniques used by geographers in their investigations in fieldwork and classroom. Students are taught to critically examine their method to gather, represent, evaluate and interpret information and communicate results (Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority , 2014a).
Year 7-8 Geographical Inquiry and Skills (Quote from Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority , 2014c):

1. Observing, questioning and planning
Develop geographically significant questions and plan an inquiry, using appropriate geographical methodologies and concepts
2. Collecting, recording, evaluating and representing
Collect, select and record relevant geographical data and information, using ethical protocols, from appropriate primary and secondary sources
Evaluate sources for their reliability and usefulness and represent data in a range of appropriate forms, for example, climate graphs, compound column graphs, population pyramids, tables, field sketches and annotated diagrams, with and without the use of digital and spatial technologies
Represent the spatial distribution of different types of geographical phenomena by constructing appropriate maps at different scales that conform to cartographic conventions, using spatial technologies as appropriate
3. Interpreting, analysing and concluding
Analyse geographical data and other information using qualitative and quantitative methods, and digital and spatial technologies as appropriate, to identify and propose explanations for spatial distributions, patterns and trends and infer relationships
Apply geographical concepts to draw conclusions based on the analysis of the data and information collected
4. Communicating
Present findings, arguments and ideas in a range of communication forms selected to suit a particular audience and purpose; using geographical terminology and digital technologies as appropriate
5. Reflecting and responding
Reflect on their learning to propose individual and collective action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social considerations, and predict the expected outcomes of their proposal

Further details can be found at:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10#level7
Year 9-10 Geographical Skills Acquired (Quote from Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority , 2014c):

1. Observing, questioning and planning
Develop geographically significant questions and plan an inquiry that identifies and applies appropriate geographical methodologies and concepts
2. Collecting, recording, evaluating and representing
Collect, select, record and organise relevant data and geographical information, using ethical protocols, from a range of appropriate primary and secondary sources
Evaluate sources for their reliability, bias and usefulness and represent multi-variable data in a range of appropriate forms, for example, scatter plots, tables, field sketches and annotated diagrams with and without the use of digital and spatial technologies
Represent the spatial distribution of geographical phenomena by constructing special purpose maps that conform to cartographic conventions, using spatial technologies as appropriate
3. Interpreting, analysing and concluding
Evaluate multi-variable data and other geographical information using qualitative and quantitative methods and digital and spatial technologies as appropriate to make generalisations and inferences, propose explanations for patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies, and predict outcomes
Apply geographical concepts to synthesise information from various sources and draw conclusions based on the analysis of data and information, taking into account alternative points of view
Identify how geographical information systems (GIS) might be used to analyse geographical data and make predictions
4. Communicating
Present findings, arguments and explanations in a range of appropriate communication forms selected for their effectiveness and to suit audience and purpose, using relevant geographical terminology and digital technologies as appropriate
5. Reflecting and responding
Reflect on and evaluate the findings of the inquiry to propose individual and collective action in response to a contemporary geographical challenge, taking account of environmental, economic and social considerations; and explain the predicted outcomes and consequences of their proposal

Further details can be found at:
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10#level10
The scale of inquiry and the geographical context may vary (
Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority, 2014a
)
Contemporary
Geography
teaches...
References:

Australian Academy of Science National Committee for Geography (2007). Australians Need Geography. Retrieved from http://www.cursions.com.au/school-resources/3226//Australians-Need-Geography


Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority (2014a). Content structure. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/content-structure


Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority (2014b). Concepts for developing geographical understanding. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/concepts-for-developing-geographical-understanding


Australian Curriculum Assessment Reinforcement Authority (2014c). Foundation to year 10 curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/humanitiesandsocialsciences/geography/Curriculum/F-10


Australian Geography Teachers Association (2013a). Teaching and learning in the geography classroom. Retrieved from http://www.geogspace.edu.au/support-units/professional-practice/pp-overview.html


Australian Geography Teachers Association (2013b). Why teach geography? Retrieved from http://www.geogspace.edu.au/support-units/why-teach-geography/wtg-introduction.html


British Educational Communications and Technology Agency (2004). What the research says about using ICT in geography. Retrieved from http://dera.ioe.ac.uk/1653/13/wtrs_geography.pdf


Deck, A. D. (1981). Geography in Teacher Education: Changes and Challenges. Journal of Further and Higher Education, 5:3, 54-59. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0309877810050308


Flanagan, M. (2014). "Where is the Dead Sea?" "I didn't even know it was sick!" [Image]. Retrieved from http://www.cartoonstock.com/directory/g/geography_teacher.asp


Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria (2007). Geography: It's Essential. Retrieved from http://www.agta.asn.au/files/Resources/2009/Geog_Essential.pdf


International Geographical Union Commission on Geographical Education (IGU-CGE) (2006). The International Charter on Geographical Education, First Draft. Retrieved from http://igu-cge.tamu.edu/cgecharter2005.pdf


Kane, S. (2013, May 31). Why Should I Care About Geography? [Video file]. Retrieved from


Marsh, C. & Hart, C. (2011). Teaching the social sciences and humanities in an Australian curriculum (6th Ed.) N.S.W., Australia: Pearson Australia


Mclnerney, M., Berg, K., Hutchinson, N., Maude, A. & Sorenson, L., (2009). Towards a National Geography Curriculum for Australia. Retrieved from http://www.ngc.org.au/report/report/background_report_Final.pdf


NSW Department of Education and Training (2010). Geography for those new to teaching the subject. Retrieved from http://www.curriculumsupport.education.nsw.gov.au/secondary/hsie/new_teachers/index.htm


Piotrowski, D. (2014, March 22). American news networks screw up their geography and call Tony Abbott “Prime Minister John Abbot”. News.com.au. Retrieved from http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/american-news-networks-screw-up-their-geography-and-call-tony-abbott-prime-minister-john-abbot/story-fnizu68q-1226861047746


Purnell, K. (2010). Geography teaching: sharing the expertise. Geographical Education, 23, 41-46.


Walls, Richard, T., Nardi, A., Minden, A., and Hoffman, N. (2002). The Characteristics of Effective and Ineffective Teachers. Teacher Education Quarterly, 2002, 39-48.


Swcorp (2010, March 5). What is Geography? [Video file]. Retrieved from


Twenty First Century Skills Map. (2010). Retrieve from http://21stcenturyskills.org/documents/21stskillsmap_geog.pdf
Australian Academy of Science National Committee for Geography (2007) identified several issues teachers face in geography education:

teachers often find themselves lack of expertise in teaching the discipline
students generally show low interest in the subject which is deemed as academically demanding with above average workload
parents and students see geography as vocationally irrelevant comparing to subjects such as chemistry or law
in the lower secondary, the subject is absorbed in the generic subject of “ studies of society and environment” with diminished significance


Deck (1982) indicated that the logistical arrangements and documentation work can be challenging and sometimes can take away the teacher's focus


Marsh and Hart (2011) further identify that:

teachers lack the strategies that promote interests, and at the same time provide correct, current understanding of contemporary geography
teachers tend to over-rely on single textbook source which could be culturally bias towards issues
Geography curricula began to integrate humanistic geography (study of self and others and their relationship with the world), emancipatory geography (mankind determine his own destiny) and radial geography (study of social issues)
Progression of contemporary geography drawing on behavioural, environmental, welfare and radical geography. Global education in geography was actively sought after.
Reflective and critical attitudes towards curriculum planning led to changes to school curriculum, resulting in a growing diversity of teaching approaches. The teaching styles moved from the traditional teacher-centred education (instructivist approach) to student-centred focus (constructivist approch).
Incorporation of humanistic and structuralist ideologies in planning classes on environmental issues, global inequalities and urban redevelopment
Introduction and preoccupation of contemporary Geography
1988
2001
2010
2005
1985
1970s
Cultural recognition and social justice were introduced in geography education. Anti-racist resources were produced
Cross-curricular dimensions of indigenous history and culture, Asia and Australia's engagement with Asia, sustainability and general capabilities were also part of the Australian Curriculum: Geography which contained knowledge of facts, processes and inquiry skills as well.
Source: Marsh & Hart (2011)
Hello!
Welcome to the Teaching and Learning Resource
for
Geography

education in lower secondary.

To teach Geography effectively, a teacher must posses
basic understanding of the discipline
, such is its
definition
, and
brief history
,
appreciate the
significance
of geography education
, know
what and how to teach

as well as be
aware of the issues geography teachers face
so as to meet the challenges with preparedness and competence!

This resource seeks to provide answers to these questions with
useful online resources and tools
also attached
to equip you with the knowledge and skills to become an exemplary geography teacher.

The following presentation shall take you
through the resource sequentially.

Happy studying and teaching!
The significance of geography
Effective geography teachers helps the students to value geography
A good geography teacher helps students grasp the concept of contemporary geography clearly
Details of the news report can be found here:
http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/american-news-networks-screw-up-their-geography-and-call-tony-abbott-prime-minister-john-abbot/story-fnizu68q-1226861047746
The lack of geographical knowledge in America and the resultant serious public embarrassment further illustrates the importance of geography education.
Source: Piotrowski, D. (2014)
Cartoon source: (Flanagan, 2014)
Video source: Swcorp (2010)
Video source: Kane (2013)
A good geography teacher promotes student-centred learning:

He arouses students' curiosity, facilitate student-driven investigations, welcomes questions and encourage risk taking in classroom learning (Australian Geography Teachers' Association, 2010; Marsh & Hart, 2011).

He asks open-ended questions to assess students' understanding and to encourage further discussions (Australian Geography Teachers' Association, 2010)
Considers student diversities and uses a wide range of teaching approaches:
He considers students' needs and vary teaching strategies to cater for different students' interests and learning styles (IGU-CGE, 2006 as cited in Marsh & Hart, 2011 p. 255)
h
Considers student diversities and uses a wide range of teaching approaches:

He considers students' needs and vary teaching strategies to cater for different students' interests and learning styles (IGU-CGE, 2006 as cited in Marsh & Hart, 2011 p. 255)
Good geography teacher continues to improve:

He reflects on his own teaching, evaluates them and make adjustments and improvements. Also, he is willing to undergo professional development to renew his geographical knowledge and skills (Purnell, 2010)
Useful resources and tool for effective teaching
Proficient geography teacher is captivatingly engaging in teaching:

He actively engages students

by nurturing their curiosity of the world, by relating geographical lessons to daily experiences and meaningful
contexts and by engaging intellectually and emotionally in values development (Marsh & Hart, 2011).
Proficient geography teacher is captivatingly engaging in teaching:

He actively engages students

by nurturing their curiosity of the world, by relating geographical lessons to daily experiences and meaningful
contexts and by engaging intellectually and emotionally in values development (Marsh & Hart, 2011).
A good geography teacher uses information and communication technologies (ICT) to enhance teaching:

ICT simplify many geographical concepts, present data in simple and accessible formats, enhance spatial awareness and provoke higher level thinking (British Communication and Technology Agency, 2004)
Picture Source: Walls et al. (2002)
Thank you for watching this presentation!

Hopefully you already have a good understanding of what it means to be an effective teacher.

Now go and inspire the world.

The future is our hand.
Full transcript