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THE ILIAD - by Homer

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Lirio Ann Rodriguez

on 21 July 2016

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Transcript of THE ILIAD - by Homer

Who is Homer?
SUMMARY
The poem is written in
dactylic

hexameter
. The Iliad comprises roughly
16,000 lines
of verse. Later Greeks divided it into
twenty-four
books, and this convention has lasted to the present day with little change

The Iliad is an epic poem. It is among the oldest extant works of Western literature. It is written in Homeric Greek, a literary amalgam of Ionic Greek and other dialects.

THE ILIAD - by Homer
Born:
c. 800 B.C.
Birthplace:
Greece
Died:
c. 750 B.C.
Best Known as:
Author of the Iliad and Odyssey
Nickname:
Blind Bard

ACHAEANS

Agamemnon
King of Mycenae, leader of the Greeks.
Achilles
Leader of the Myrmidons, half-divine war hero.

Odysseus
King of Ithaca, the wiliest Greek commander and hero of the Odyssey
Aias (Ajax the Greater)
son of Telamon, with Diomedes, he is second to Achilles in martial prowess.

Aias (Ajax the Lesser)
son of Oileus, often partner of Ajax the Greater
The Achaeans (Ἀχαιοί) — aka the Hellenes (Greeks), Danaans (Δαναοί), and Argives (Ἀργεĩοι).

Diomedes
son of Tydeus, King of Argos
Menelaus
King of Sparta, husband of Helen and brother of Agamemnon
Patroclus
Achilles’ closest companion
Nestor
King of Pylos
TROJANS
TROJAN MEN
TROJAN WOMEN
Hector
son of King Priam and the foremost Trojan warrior.

brother of Hector and Paris.

Helen’s lover-abductor
Polydamas
a prudent commander whose advice is ignored; he is Hector’s foil.

Polydorus — son of Priam and Laothoe.
Pandarus — famous archer and son of Lycaon.
Agenor — a Trojan warrior who attempts to fight Achilles (Book XXI).
Sarpedon, son of Zeus — killed by Patroclus. Was friend of Glaucus and co-leader of the Lycians (fought for the Trojans).
Glaucus, son of Hippolochus — friend of Sarpedon and co-leader of the Lycians (fought for the Trojans).
Euphorbus — first Trojan warrior to wound Patroclus.
Dolon — a spy upon the Greek camp (Book X).

Aeneas
son of Anchises and Aphrodite
Deiphobus
Paris
Priam
the aged King of Troy
Antenor
King Priam’s advisor, who argues for returning Helen to end the war. Paris refuses.

Menelaus’s wife; espoused first to Paris, then to Deiphobus; her abduction by Paris precipitated the war
Hecuba
Priam’s wife, mother of Hector, Cassandra, Paris, and others
Andromache
Hector’s wife, mother of Astyanax 
Helen
Briseis
a Trojan woman captured by the Greeks; she was Achilles' prize of the Trojan war.

Cassandra
Priam’s daughter; courted by Apollo, who bestows the gift of prophecy to her; upon her rejection, he curses her, and her warnings of Trojan doom go unheeded.

Book 15
Book 16
Book 18
Book 17
Book 14
Book 13
Book 15: Zeus stops Poseidon from interfering

Book 16: Patroclus borrows Achilles' armor, enters battle, kills Sarpedon and then is killed by Hector, who thinks he is Achilles.
Book 17: The armies fight over the body and armor of Patroclus

Book 18: Achilles learns of the death of Patroclus and receives a new suit of armor

Book 13: Poseidon motivates the Greeks

Book 14: Hera helps Poseidon assist the Greeks

Book 9
Book 10
Book 12
Book 11

Book 8
Book 7
Book 9: Agamemnon retreats: his overtures to Achilles are spurned

Book 10: Diomedes and Odysseus go on a spy mission

Book 11: Paris wounds Diomedes, and Achilles sends Patroclus on a mission

Book 12: The Greeks retreat to their camp and are besieged by the Trojans

Book 7: Hector battles Ajax

Book 8: The gods withdraw from the battle

BOOK 3

Book 4
Book 6
Book 5
BOOK 2
BOOK 1
Book 3: Paris challenges Menelaus to single combat

Book 4: The truce is broken and battle begins

Book 5: Diomedes has an aristea and wounds Aphrodite and Ares

Book 6: Glaucus and Diomedes greet during a truce

Book 1:
Ten years into the war, Achilles and Agamemnon quarrel over a slave girl, Achilles withdraws from the war in anger

Book 2
Odysseus motivates the Greeks to keep fighting; Catalogue of Ships, Catalogue of Trojans and Allies

THE SUMMARY OF THE BOOKS
Book 21
Book 22
Book 24
Book 23
Book 20
Book 19
Book 21: Achilles fights with the river Scamander and encounters Hector in front of the Trojan gates

Book 22: Achilles kills Hector and drags his body back to the Greek camp

Book 23: Funeral games for Patroclus

Book 24: Achilles lets Priam have Hector's body back, and he is burned on a pyre

Book 19: Achilles reconciles with Agamemnon and enters battle

Book 20: The gods join the battle; Achilles tries to kill Aeneas

YOU MUST KNOW:
AFTER ILIAD:
THE END
RESOURCES:

http://www.sparknotes.com/lit/iliad/summary.html
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0332452/synopsis?ref_=ttpl_pl_syn
www.poetryintranslation.com
Odysseus finally devised a plan to take the city. He had his men build a large, hollow wooden horse, then he and twenty others hid inside. The Greek ships withdrew out of sight of Troy, admitting defeat, and left behind them only the horse, purportedly as an offering to Poseidon for good winds on the return trip. The Trojans took this inside the city, and then feasted and celebrated in the belief the war was over.
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