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Copy of ANALYZING ARGUMENTS

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by

Lisa Mendoza

on 20 October 2015

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Transcript of Copy of ANALYZING ARGUMENTS

ANALYZING ARGUMENTS
EQ: How can a reader evaluate an author’s argument?
Vocabulary:
RHETORICAL DEVICES
Argument:


Perspective:

:
Evaluate:


Bias:


Sound reasoning:


Relevant evidence:


Reliable source:


Claim:


Reasons:


Counterclaim:
a collection of statements offered so that others may draw conclusions

a state of one's ideas "how you see things"

to place value

favorable or unfavorable tendency inclination; prejudice

an accurate assessment; thought-out opinion

evidence related to the claim and argument

a source that can be trusted

initial stance, opinion, viewpoint "what you believe to be true"

grounds to stand on, facts or proof in support of claim

a claim made against another claim

Appeals to the reader based on
AUTHORITY or HONESTY of the writer.

"well-known author"
"well-known scientist"
"Two-time MVP"
"Nobel Prize winner..."
Appeals to the reader through EMOTIONS.

Challenges sense of right and wrong.

Meant to INSPIRE.
(Think emotional appeal propaganda).
Appeals to the reader based on logic (LOGos...LOGic)

Facts and figures
Stats/Percentages

"Studies show..."
CHASING LINCOLN'S
KILLER
"John Wilkes Booth did not get what he wanted. Yes, he did kill Abraham Lincoln, but in every other way, Booth was a failure. He did not inspire the South to fight on, prolong the Civil War, or win the battles the Confederate armies had lost. He did not undo the Emancipation Proclamation and revive slavery.
And yet we still remember Booth to this day. But he is not the hero of the story. The real hero is Abraham Lincoln and the principles for which he lived - and died: freedom and equal rights for all Americans."
Ethos, Logos, and Pathos
in ARGUMENT
Diving a little deeper...
BOARD
DOOR
CLOSET
MR. MARTIN'S
DESK
ROUND TABLE
W I N D O W S
Is football just too dangerous?
YES
NO
"If I had a young son who wanted to play football, I would make sure he understood a few things first..."
"No sport or physical activity is risk-free. Concussion is an issue in every sport that our children play..."
H
EAD
H
ANDS
H
EART
L
OGOS=
L
OGIC
E
THOS=
E
XPERIENCE
P
ATHOS=
P
ASSION
8th Grade - Argument Continued...
Bad Argument
Good Argument
Logos - Logic Ethos - Experience and Authority
Pathos - Passion and strong emotions
Proposition - a plan to change something

Opposition - the opposite side of an argument

Irrelevant - not pertaining to an issue

Nuance - a slight degree of difference

ADDITIONS

Bias - a preference that prevents objectivity

Claim - thesis statement

Counterclaim - helps provide balance to an
argument

Full transcript