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IF YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT, THEN WHAT AM I?

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Kah Ndamukong

on 2 April 2014

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Transcript of IF YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT, THEN WHAT AM I?

IF YOU ARE WHAT YOU EAT, THEN WHAT AM I?
Geeta Kothari

ETHOS
"...my mother buys the tuna hoping to satisfy my longing for American food Indians, of course, do not eat such things." (923)

Indians do not eat certain foods because of their religion. Many of them are vegetarians. Hindus do not eat beef, Muslims do not eat pork Sikhs do not eat beef. Lamb, Chicken, and Fish are the main servings.
PATHOS
“If I really want to make myself sick, I worry that my husband will one day leave me for a meat eater, for someone familiar who does not sniff him suspiciously for signs of alimentary infidelity.” (926).

She gives examples of how she feels because of her race living in a different country. Her parents are more of their culture and are not trying to be Americanized so she despises her parents for that.

LOGOS
"I see their sandwiches yet cannot explain the discrepancy between them and the stinking, oily fish in my mother's hand. We do not understand so many things, my mother and I." (923)

Kothari explains in this quote because they are of different culture from Americans they do not know what tuna looks like or what is eaten with it. Where as if they were American they would know.
Conclusion
Kothari shows that she is a girl that is embarrassed to embrace her cultural foods because; it does not look like the food that Americans eat. She is confused as to what she should be and what she should eat. To the point that she is starting not to like some of the foods that Indians eat but, at the end of the day she craves the Indian dishes her mom makes and tries to make them herself later on.
CLAIM
Disappointment, Embarrassment, Curiosity, Eagerness, and Confusion

The author Geeta Kothari is
disappointed
with her family for staying in the Indian culture and is
embarrassed
about the food Indians eat. She is somewhat
curious
of how it would be to be an American. She is very
eager
to change into the American culture but, is
confused
on how she could be Indian an American at the same time with out being judged by either sides.
BLOOM'S TAXONOMY
What could be done to minimize her negative point of view?

Her parents could have taught her that it was okay to be different from others, and she should have expected who she is.
Full transcript