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Standing Female Nude

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Keith Anto

on 3 April 2014

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Transcript of Standing Female Nude

Conclusion
Part 1: Gender (inequality, constructions of masculinity and femininity)
Keith Anto
Thursday, March 27, 2014
by Carol Ann Duffy
Background
by Carol Ann Duffy (1985)
Standing Female Nude
The poem deals heavily with the social injustice in both class and gender.

Theme:
- Objectification of Women
- Inequality of Social Class

Characters:
- Model/Prostitute
- Artist
- Museum Goers (Bourgeoisie)
Inequality of Social Class
Standing Female Nude
"Six hours like this for a few francs"
(line 1)
Poem begins with a cynical tone - emphasises of working conditions for both the model/prostitute and the artist - coming from a lower class.

"He is concerned with volume, space. I with the next meal."
(line 8-9)
First and last concern for the model/prostitute is about money. Work being done not out of kindness of heart, but out of necessity.

"Little man, you've not the money for the arts I sell. Both poor, we make our living how we can."
(line 19-21)







Standing Female Nude by Carol Ann Duffy

Six hours like this for a few francs.
Belly nipple arse in the window light,
he drains the colour from me.
Further to the right,
Madame. And do try to be still.
I shall be represented analytically and hung
in great museums.
The bourgeoisie will coo
at such an image of a river-whore.
They call it Art.


Maybe.
He is concerned with volume, space.
I with the next meal.

You’re getting thin,
Madame, this is not good.
My breasts hang
slightly low, the studio is cold. In the tea-leaves
I can see the Queen of England gazing
on my shape. Magnificent, she murmurs,
moving on. It makes me laugh. His name


is Georges. They tell me he’s a genius.
There are time he does not concentrate
and stiffens for my warmth.
He possesses me on canvas as he dips the brush
repeatedly into the paint.
Little man,
you’ve not the money for the arts I sell.
Both poor, we make our living how we can
.


I ask him Why do you do this?
Because
I have to. There’s no choice. Don’t talk.

My smile confuses him. These artists
take themselves too seriously. At night I fill myself
with wine and dance around the bars. When it’s
finished
he shows me proudly, lights a cigarette. I say
Twelve francs and get my shawl. It does not look like
me.

Inequality of Social Class
Standing Female Nude
"The bourgeoisie will coo at such an image of a river-whore. They call it Art."
(line 6-7)

Definition - Bourgeoisie: (according to the Karl Marxist Theory) the class that, in contrast to the proletariat or wage-earning class.

Emphasises the inequality between classes. Portrays the image of a starving artist and the upper class museum goer.

The Bourgeoisie do not look or examine the painting, but rather "coo" at it like children enjoying a pretty picture. They have the privilege of deciding what is important art.





Objectification of Women
Standing Female Nude
Title -
Standing Female Nude
-> presenting women as objects

"Belly nipple arse in the window light, he drains the colour from me."
(line 2-3)
The speaker reduces herself into parts, a deconstructed description of herself -> objectification of women

"The bourgeoisie will coo at such an image of a river-whore."
(line 6-7)
"Whore" is referred to a sexist language, sells her body as a model and as a prostitute to earn a living.








Objectification of Women
Standing Female Nude
"You're getting thin, Madame, this is not good."
(line 9-10)
If she is becoming thinner, then she would have difficulty in finding work and making a living. - society's expected perception of women
The Artist is concerned whether the appearance of the model would affect his art.

"It does not look like me"
(line 30-31)
The artist molded the model’s figure into an piece of art that would be aesthetically pleasing to the audience. However, at the conclusion of the session, the model feels out of control and objectified by a man that believes himself superior to her.


Dolce & Gabbana Advertisement
- Highly sexualized
- Portrayed as objects that belong to men
- Women are forced to compare themeselves to images produced by the media

- Objectification of women: The women is reduced to be represented by parts of her body
Tom Ford Perfume Advertisement
- Duffy Poem: Standing Female Nude portrays two major themes: Inequality of social class and Objectification of women.

- Objectification of women is emphasised in the media repeatedly through advertisements, where women are portrayed as objects and are deconstructed according to their physical parts.
Full transcript