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Elements/Principles Projects

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megan ruckel

on 26 January 2015

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Transcript of Elements/Principles Projects

Bad Hair Day:
Zentangle
Elements & Principles Projects

Examples:
Pattern
**ADD TO PoD CHART**
Pattern refers to the repetition or recurrence of a design element, exact or varied, which establishes a visual beat.
ZENTANGLE
**ADD TO BAV**
The Zentangle Method is an easy-to-learn, relaxing, and fun way to create beautiful images by drawing structured patterns.
A form of “artistic meditation,” allowing the artist to become completely engrossed in making each pattern, deliberately focusing on “one stroke at a time”.
Zentangles
Zentangle Tutorials
Auraknot

Spooled
Mooka
Bad Hair Day:
Zentangle
Bad Hair Day
Zentangle
After I approve your sketch.......
First, glue down your picture at the top (beard) or bottom (hair) of the page
OR draw a self-portrait OR find a magazine clip of someone's face
Next, draw the outline of your hair/beard
Then, divide hair/beard into random sections
Begin filling in each section with a different Zentangle pattern, drawing first in pencil, then going over your lines in pen
You may add additional shading using your pencil
Fill in the background with concentric lines of color (I'll demonstrate)
FOR MORE ZENTANGLE PATTERNS: Tanglepatterns.com, Zentangle.com, Youtube tutorials
Zentangle Video
Practice with Zentangle:
In your sketchbooks,
try 5 or more of the patterns on your table
Color
** ADD TO ELEMENTS TRI-FOLD**
Color is produced by the way our vision responds to different wavelengths of light. All colors come from the three primaries (red, yellow, and blue) and black and white.
*NOTES: Color has three properties - hue, value, and intensity.
COLOR
Neutral Colors: white, black, gray, brown
Color Wheel
* In your sketchbook, create a color wheel using tempera paint
*** NOTES: The color itself (e.g. blue, red), refers to the color's position in the light spectrum; each hue has a definite position and wavelength in the spectrum
HUE
Value
***NOTES: The lightness and darkness of a color, or the quantity of light that a color reflects
Tint = color + white
Shade = color + black
Tint
Shade
Intensity
***NOTES: The quality of light in a color; the brighter and duller colors of the same hue.

Higher saturation = higher intensity
**NOTES:
Color Trees
Emphasis
** ADD TO PoD CHART IN ART FOLDER **

Emphasis refers to the created center of interest, the place in an artwork where your eye first lands.
Element of Art: Color
Principle of Design: Emphasis
Element of Art:
Texture
Principle of Design:
Pattern
Color Trees
You will create a color tree using one of these color scheme combinations:
Warm and Cool
Primary and Secondary
Complementary and Analogous
Complementary and Neutral
Analogous and Neutral
Tint and Shade

First, you'll create a sketch in your sketchbooks. Once I approve your sketch, you may begin working on your final project.
Step 1: Draw tree outline, tracing a circular lid for the leaves
Step 2: Create a grid across the entire page. Use a ruler to draw a line for every inch.
Step 3: Fill in tree with bark patterns
Step 4: Color in leaves on tree using one type of color scheme (warm in this example)
Step 5: Color in background using a different type of color scheme
(cool in this example)
PRIMARY COLOR SCHEME: Red, Yellow, Blue
SECONDARY COLOR SCHEME: Green, Orange, Purple
WARM COLOR SCHEME: Red, Orange, Yellow
COOL COLOR SCHEME: Green, Blue, Purple
COMPLEMENTARY COLOR SCHEME: Orange/Blue, Red/Green, Yellow/Purple
ANALOGOUS COLOR SCHEME: 3 Neighbors on the Color Wheel (ex: yellow, yellow-green, green)
TINT
color + white
3 Properties of Color:

HUE: the color itself

INTENSITY: saturation/quality of light




VALUE: lightness and darkness of a color
SHADE
color + black
Red Blue
Sochi-Inspired
Watercolors
Element of Art: Shape
Principle of Design: Unity
Shape
** ADD TO ELEMENTS TRI-FOLD**
A shape is an enclosed space that has length and width, and is
two-dimensional.

**NOTES: Shapes can be geometric or organic
Unity
*** ADD TO PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN CHART ***
Unity is achieved when all parts of a work of art combine to create a sense of oneness or harmony. Artist typically use the repetition of visual units (shapes, colors, etc.) to develop a feeling of unity within a design.
Basic Watercolor Techniques
Flat Wash
Graded Wash
Dry-on-Dry
Wet-on-Dry
Wet-on-Wet
Blotting
Sochi-Inspired
Watercolors
Element of Art: Shape
Principle of Design: Unity
For this project, you have TWO options:
Create a sports-themed pictogram using watercolor, inspired by the 2014 Sochi Olympic pictograms
Create your own pictogram (inspired by the 2014 Sochi Olympic pictograms) using watercolor, based on your personal interests, talents, and hobbies
Sochi 2014 Designs
These patterns appear on the Russian team’s official uniforms, flags and banners around the games, and occasionally fill in the characters of the logo.

The designs are based on traditional Russian quilting patterns and, in particular, a form of Russian design called Khokhloma.

A folk craft dating back to the 17th century, Khokhloma is seen as a very important element of traditional Russian visual culture.

Pronunciation: http://www.forvo.com/word/%D1%85%D0%BE%D1%85%D0%BB%D0%BE%D0%BC%D0%B0_%28khokhloma%29/#ru

2014 Sochi Olympic Patterns and Motifs
Wooden bowls decorated in the Khokhloma style
Sochi Olympic Patterns based on quilting designs
2014 Sochi Olympic Branding
2014 Sochi Olympic Pictograms
Sochi-Inspired
Watercolors
Element of Art: Shape
Principle of Design: Unity

First do a practice pictogram in your sketchbook:
Draw the logo in pencil first
Decorate the logo with different shapes and patterns in watercolor
If you're doing a winter sports-themed Sochi pictogram, use the types of patterns seen in traditional Russian arts (handouts on your table)
If you're making your own original pictogram, use shapes and patterns that reflect your personal interests, talents, and hobbies
Pictogram
*** ADD TO BAV ***
A symbol representing a word or an idea
Matryoshka: Russian nesting dolls
http://www.nbcolympics.com/video/eva-samkova-wins-gold-womens-snowboard-cross

Element of Art: Value
Principle of Design: Contrast
Value
*** ADD TO ELEMENTS TRI-FOLD ***
Value refers to the relative lightness and darkness and is perceived in terms of varying levels of contrast.
Contrast
** ADD TO PoD CHART **
Contrast can be the use of several elements of art to hold the viewer's attention and to guide the viewer's eye through the artwork. Creating tension between opposites.

LARGE/SMALL DARK/LIGHT
SOFT/HARD BLACK/WHITE
DULL/BRIGHT
2D Art I:
Seurat Pointillist
Landscape
BAV Vocabulary
Georges Seurat (1859-1891): French Post-Impressionist painter, known for his innovative use of drawing media and for developing the painting technique known as pointillism.

Pointillism: a painting technique in which small, distinct dots of pure color are applied in patterns to form an image. Georges Seurat and Paul Signac developed the technique in 1886, branching from Impressionism.
Georges Seurat,
A Sunday on
La Grande Jatte
, 1884, Oil on canvas
BAV Vocabulary [cont.'d]
Landscape: A work of art (drawing, painting, print, etc.) that features scenes of nature: mountains, lakes, gardens, rivers, etc.
Landscapes
Seurat Pointillist
Landscape
Find a landscape composition that you like either online or in one of the National Geographic Magazines
LIGHTLY draw the landscape in pencil in your sketchbook
Paint your landscape using pointillism (dip Q-tips in tempera paint)
Develop lighter/darker areas of value to create contrast using color
You'll have a larger piece of white paper for your final project.
Practicing with Pointillism
Pointillist Value Scales using Color
One Color
Two Primary Colors
Two Colors of Your Choice
First, read the Scholastic Art Magazine: Georges Seurat, Working with Color
Pages 1-9
You may read alone or with
one
partner
Also read about the project on Pages 14-15
If you finish early, see if you can do the matching activity on the last page (verbally, you do not have to write down the answers)
3D Art I:
Chuck Close Value Portraits
Value
*** ADD TO ELEMENTS TRI-FOLD ***
Value refers to the relative lightness and darkness, and is perceived in terms of varying levels of contrast.
Element of Art: Value
Principle of Design: Contrast
Contrast
** ADD TO PoD CHART **
Contrast involves creating tension between opposites. It can be the use of several elements of art to hold the viewer's attention and to guide the viewer's eye through the artwork.

LARGE/SMALL DARK/LIGHT
SOFT/HARD BLACK/WHITE
DULL/BRIGHT
Practicing with Value
In your sketchbook, make and label 7 value scales:
Hatching
Cross-hatching
Stippling
Shading
Squiggles
Circles
Make Your Own
Chuck Close
BAV Vocabulary
An American painter and photographer (born July 5, 1940) who achieved fame as a photorealist, through his massive-scale portraits. Close lives and works in New York.

Working from a gridded photograph, he builds his images by applying one careful stroke after another in multi-colors or grayscale. He works methodically, starting his loose but regular grid from the left hand corner of the canvas.[11] His works are generally larger than life and highly focused
Chuck Close:
A Portrait in Progress
3D Art I:
Chuck Close Value Portraits
Element of Art: Value
Principle of Design: Contrast
Chuck Close
Value Portraits
First, find and print a black and white photograph
Should be high contrast
As close to 8.5" x 11" as possible
Draw a one-inch grid in your sketchbook and over your photograph
You may trace the basic shape of your subject matter using carbon paper
With a black pen, work one square at a time, trying to recreate the values you see within each square of the photo
2D Art I:
Seurat Pointillist
Landscape

Georges Seurat,
A Sunday on La Grande Jatte
, 1884, Oil on canvas
2D Art I
Fuzzy Creatures
Element of Art:
Texture
Principle of Design:
Rhythm/Movement
Texture
*** ADD TO EoA TRI-FOLD ***
Texture refers to the tactile qualities of a surface (actual) or to the visual representation of such surface qualities (implied).
Rhythm
*** ADD TO PoD CHART IN ART FOLDER ***

Rhythm, similar to rhythm in music and dance, is the repetition of visual movement of the elements - colors, shapes, lines, values, forms, spaces, and textures. Movement and rhythm work together to create the visual equivalent of a musical beat.
*** ADD TO PoD CHART IN ART FOLDER ***

The way the artist leads the eye in, around, and through a composition. The path the eye follows, it can set a mood or convey a feeling.
Three Types of Movement:

Kinetic Movement: actual physical movement
Recorded Action: shift eyes to follow action
Compositional Movement: comparing positions of stationary objects/space within a design
Movement
Dr. Harold Edgerton,
Densmore Shute
, 1938
Photo: a 1/100,000-second strobe flashed every 1/100 second to make this image
Recorded Action
Compositional Movement
Allan Houser,
Desert Dweller
, 1990, Bronze
Vincent van Gogh,
Starry Night
,
1889, oil on canvas
Miriam Schapiro,
Master of Ceremonies
, 1985, acrylic and fabric on canvas
Architectural Rhythm
: The City of Arts and Sciences in Valencia, Spain, Completed 1998, Designed by Santiago Calatrava and Félix Candela
Texture
*** ADD TO EoA TRI-FOLD ***
Texture refers to the tactile qualities of a surface (actual) or to the visual representation of such surface qualities (implied).
Rhythm
*** ADD TO PoD CHART IN ART FOLDER ***

Rhythm, similar to rhythm in music and dance, is the repetition of visual movement of the elements - colors, shapes, lines, values, forms, spaces, and textures. Movement and rhythm work together to create the visual equivalent of a musical beat.
Miriam Schapiro,
Master of Ceremonies
, 1985, acrylic and fabric on canvas
Architectural Rhythm
: The City of Arts and Sciences in Valencia, Spain, Completed 1998, Designed by Santiago Calatrava and Félix Candela
*** ADD TO PoD CHART IN ART FOLDER ***

The way the artist leads the eye in, around, and through a composition. The path the eye follows, it can set a mood or convey a feeling.
Three Types of Movement:

Kinetic Movement: actual physical movement
Recorded Action: shift eyes to follow action
Compositional Movement: comparing positions of stationary objects/space within a design
Movement
Dr. Harold Edgerton,
Densmore Shute
, 1938
Photo: a 1/100,000-second strobe flashed every 1/100 second to make this image
Recorded Action
Compositional Movement
Allan Houser,
Desert Dweller
, 1990, Bronze
Vincent van Gogh,
Starry Night
,
1889, oil on canvas
3D Art I
Rauschenberg
Combines
Element of Art:
Texture
Principle of Design:
Rhythm/Movement
3D Art I
Rauschenberg Combines
WITH A PARTNER
:
First, read the Robert Rauschenberg Scholastic Art Magazine
Answer the reading review questions using
complete sentences
, on a
separate piece of notebook paper
(number 1-10, do not write questions)
Each person will turn in their own completed answers for
30 points total

(3 points per question, classwork grade)
Particularly pay attention to
combine project on pages 14-15
Class discussion
of reading review questions
3D Art I
Rauschenberg
Combines
Element of Art:
Texture
Principle of Design:
Rhythm/Movement
Rauschenberg
Combines

Robert Rauschenberg made Combines out of
found objects
, and created images that reflected his environment

Juxtaposition
: placing contrasting things side by side

Overlapping
: laying image/item over another

Variety
: doing something in many different ways

Repetition
: doing something over and over the same way

Symbolism
: using a design/object to represent something else

Personal Imagery
Pages 4-7
3D Art I
Rauschenberg
Combines
For this project, you will be creating
your own Combine
using a cardboard base, found objects and personal photos/items
You will have a chance to look through the materials available in the classroom, and then
bring in personal photos/items for homework
You will attach everything to your cardboard base first, and then have an opportunity to paint/draw on top of your design

Robert Rauschenberg Review Questions
1
What type of art did the Abstract Expressionists make?
2
How did Rauschenberg's work differ from that of the Abstract Expressionists?
3
Why are Rauschenberg's works called Combines?
4
What images in
Satellite
suggest Rauschenberg's Texas childhood?
5
What found materials did Rauschenberg use in
First Landing Jump
, and what kind of setting do they suggest?
6
What was Rauschenberg's rule
for working with
found objects?
7
What symbolic image did Rauschenberg use in the flat part of
Monogram
?
8
What experience did Picasso want to express in Baboon and Young?
9
What kind of imagery did Hanna Hoch use in her work?
10
How did Basquiat use found objects in his work?
Do you think an artist should send a clear message, or is it better to leave the meaning up to the viewer?
Where do you see
texture
in Rauschenberg's work?

Where do you see
rhythm/movement
in Rauschenberg's work?
First, decide on a
theme or main idea
to guide your work, examples?
Draw a
basic sketch
that shows (generally) how your items will be laid out on your cardboard base
You must be able to explain to me how your items/images relate to your central theme or main idea
Once I approve your sketch, you may begin to work on your combine
Keep all your materials in a
Ziploc bag
with your name on the outside
Play with your composition
: rearrange items multiple times before attaching anything to your base
Work back to front
Attach everything first, then paint/draw on top
3D Art I Rauschenberg Combines
2D Art I: Fuzzy Creatures
BRAINSTORMING
Make a chart in your sketchbook:
Accessory
Texture
Thumbnail Sketch
1.

2.

3.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
20.
Hair bow
smooth, soft, silky
Set up the frame for your creature using circles and lines to create a body/head and feet
Decide which direction your creature will be facing, and how many legs/feet/toes it will have
Choose at least 3 of the accessories from your list to add to your creature
Do a placement sketch of your accessories on your drawing
We will use oil pastels to color the creature (first), and chalk pastels for the background (last)
Starting with the eyes, I'll demonstrate how to create realistic color blends using pastels
To create the fur texture, you will first lay down the light and dark values and then color mid-tones on top
Then, you'll add highlights with white, pink or yellow
Finally, color the background using chalk pastels to create rhythm/movement
2D Art I
Fuzzy Creatures
Examples of
Themes/Main Ideas
for Your Combine
your childhood
your family
a trip you took
your friends
your pets
a sport you play
a hobby/interest you have
favorite sport/sports team
your favorite foods
your favorite movie/movie genre
your favorite musician(s)/band(s)
your favorite video game(s)
2D Art I
Fuzzy Creatures
Draw your creature and the accessories
in pencil
.

Color background using
chalk pastels
.
***Create
rhythm
and
movement
using dynamic lines!

Color creature and accessories using
oil pastels
.
***Make sure to use
light/dark values
to create a variety of
textures
and to make everything look more
three-dimensional!
2D Art I
One-Point Perspective Rooms
Element of Art:
Space
Principle of Design:
Balance
Space
*** ADD TO ELEMENTS OF ART TRI-FOLD ***

Refers to the distances or areas around, between or within components of a piece.
Space can be :
Positive (white or light) or Negative (black or dark)
Open or Closed
Shallow or Deep
Two-dimensional (illusion of depth) or Three-dimensional (architecture/sculpture)
Linear Perspective
*** ADD TO BAV ***

When an artist uses lines to create depth (depicting a 3D space on a 2D surface)
One-Point Perspective
*** ADD TO BAV ***

When an artist uses linear perspective in combination with a single
vanishing point
.
Balance
*** ADD TO PoD CHART ***
The way the different parts of a composition relate to one another
Balance can be:
Symmetrical
Asymmetrical
Radial
WITH A PARTNER
:
First, read the Perspective Scholastic Art Magazine
Answer the
SUMMARIZE
questions using
complete sentences
, on a
separate piece of notebook paper
(number 1-5, do not write questions)
Each person will turn in their own completed answers for
30 points total

(6 points per question, classwork grade)
Particularly pay attention to the perspective
project on pages 14-15
Class discussion
of questions
Perspective Puzzle
SUMMARIZE:
PERSPECTIVE
Questions
1

In paintings that feature linear perspective, how do figures that are close to the viewer look different from figures that are distant?
2

What is aerial perspective?
How is it different from linear perspective?
3

What are some reasons a city might be a good subject for a perspective drawing?
4

What is one example of an artwork in this issue that features distortion? How so?
5

Choose your favorite painting in this issue. Write a sentence describing it. Then write another sentence about how the artist used perspective to create it.
2D Art I
One-Point Perspective Rooms
Element of Art:
Space
Principle of Design:
Balance
2D Art I
One-Point Perspective
Andrew Wyeth,
Christina's World
, 1948, Gesso, Tempera paint
Sultan Ahmed Mosque, aka Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey, built 1609-1616
Grandma Moses,
Hoosick Falls in Winter
, 1944, Oil on hardboard
Grant Wood,
Stone City, Iowa
, 1930, Oil in wood panel
Richard Estes,
The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
, 1979, Oil on canvas
Henri Rousseau, The Sleeping Gypsy, 1897, Oil
You will create a room using one-point perspective
Demonstration
Student Examples:
2D Art I
One-Point Perspective Rooms
Decide what type of room you want to create
Balance: symmetrical, asymmetrical, or radial?

Draw a sketch in pencil first
I'll approve your sketch
You can color in your final design using any of the materials in the box at your table
3D Art I
Two-Point Perspective
Cityscapes
Element of Art:
Space
Principle of Design:
Balance
Space
*** ADD TO ELEMENTS OF ART TRI-FOLD ***

Refers to the distances or areas around, between or within components of a piece.
Space can be :
Positive (white or light) or Negative (black or dark)
Open or Closed
Shallow or Deep
Two-dimensional (illusion of depth) or Three-dimensional (architecture/sculpture)
Two-Point Perspective
*** ADD TO BAV ***

When an artist uses linear perspective in combination with two
vanishing points
.
WITH A PARTNER
:
First, read the Perspective Scholastic Art Magazine
Answer the
WRITE ABOUT PERSPECTIVE
questions using
complete sentences
, on a
separate piece of notebook paper
(number 1-10, do not write questions)
Each person will turn in their own completed answers for
30 points total

(3 points per question, classwork grade)
Particularly pay attention to the perspective
project on pages 14-15
Class discussion
of questions
WRITE ABOUT
PERSPECTIVE
Questions
1

How did art change after Renaissance artists developed the concept of perspective?
2

What can an artist do with two-point perspective that he/she can't do with one-point perspective?
3
How does the aerial perspective in the background of Leonardo's
Mona Lisa
affect its mood?
4
Why might an artist want to place a foreshortened object in his/her painting? How would it change the way the viewer sees the object?
5

Why might 20th century artist Giorgio de Chirico think that modern time made people anxious? How did the use of perspective in his painting convey that idea?
6

Edward Hopper said, "If you could say it in words, there would be no reason to paint." Do you agree or disagree? Do you think it is possible to describe a painting's meaning in words? Why or why not?
7

Hopper said that he wanted to paint sunlight on the side of a house. How did he use perspective in
House by the Railroad
to give a sunlit house such a creepy, eerie mood?
8

Both Edward Hopper and Richard Estes painted scenes in cities. How are these scenes alike? How are they different?
9

Why might Richard Estes have chosen to tightly crop the car in his 2003 painting
Broad Street
?
10

How are Estes's earlier works different from his later works?
3D Art I
Two-Point Perspective
Cityscapes
Element of Art:
Space
Principle of Design:
Balance

Two-Point Perspective Cityscape
3D Street Art
Student Examples
Full transcript