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Heart to Heart

A pregnancy, STD and HIV prevention program for adolescents
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Saidie Rodriguez

on 28 March 2011

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Transcript of Heart to Heart

"Heart to Heart: A teen pregnancy, STD/HIV prevention program" Background Big Ideas... Community Needs Assessment Connect Focus Group Communicate Create Collaborate Sessions and Results Why drop out of high school? Education is one of the strongest predictors of health, superseding income and occupation. However, high school dropout rates are increasingly concentrated among low-income, black and Hispanic students. Freudenberg N, Ruglis J. Reframing school dropout as a public health issue. Prev Chronic Dis 2007;4(4). http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2007/oct/07_0063.htm. Accessed November 23, 2008. Swanson CB. Who graduates? Who doesn’t? A statistical portrait of public high school graduation, class of 2001. Washington (DC): The Urban Institute; 2004. http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410934_WhoGraduates.pdf "not fitting in" male having to work pregnancy PEERS WITH LOW EDUCATIONAL ASPIRATION high student to teacher ratio large school district feeling unsafe substance use Freudenberg N, Ruglis J. Reframing school dropout as a public health issue. Prev Chronic Dis 2007;4(4). http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2007/oct/07_0063.htm. Accessed November 23, 2008 Group 1: Demographics Neighborhood Planning Unit O
located on I-20 East
East Lake Median Household Income: $34,124
38.2% are high school gradutes East Lake Family YMCA
Jan 12-22 2009 Group 1 key informant interviews:
Mr. Franklin Hamilton, the Senior Director of Programs for YMCA East Lake
Miss. Lauren Bartholomew, teen mentor Objectives
75%will be able to evaluate 3 consequences of becoming an adolescent parent

50% will demonstrate at least 2 alternative actions, 2 delay tactic, and identify 3 effective refusal statements.

80% will be able to recognize that abstaining from sexual activity or using contraception are the only ways to avoid pregnancy, HIV and STD. Evaluation pre/post test
Group 1: lessons 1,3,5,7

Group 2: lessons 1,2,3,4 The Health Survey for Adolescents
McComb Health and Wellness Survey, the sexual behavior section Sessions:
discussion
presentation
peer-teaching
role-play build skills in:
refusal
negotiation
communication Session 1: Introduction to Heart to Heart and Abstinence*
Session 2: Using Refusal Skills
Session 3: Delaying Tactics and Avoiding High-Risk Situations*
Session 4: Getting and Using Protection*
Session 5: Skills Integration
Session 6: HIV Risk Behavior and HIV/STD Prevention*
Session 7: Planned Parenthood – Media Messages Comments “You shouldn’t have it without protection." “It’s ok to talk to somebody close to you about sex.” “I feel more comfortable to say no.” Results Group 1 Results Group 2 Attendance:
3 students attended 6
2 students attended 5 small group setting
close in age
peer teaching
interactive
non-threatening environment low numbers
variable attendance
transportation
sustainability Acknowledgment Dr. Maryl McNeal, Dr. Daniel Blumenthal and Dr. Samantha Jackson for their guidance and support
Mr. Franklin Hamilton, Senior Director of Programs at YMCA East Lake
Miss Lauren Bartholomew
Planned Parenthood – special guest
Stacey Copper
JoNell Courson
The students who participated in the Heart to Heart program Recommendations add curriculum to health class
involve care-giver Community Health Honors Defense
Saidie Rodriguez
March 28, 2011 Swanson CB. Who graduates? Who doesn’t? A statistical portrait of public high school graduation, class of 2001. Washington (DC): The Urban Institute; 2004. http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410934_WhoGraduates.pdf 8th highest state for teen
pregnancy rate GEORGIA 2 teen pregnancies/hour GA teen birth rate = 54.2
National birth rate = 41.9 4. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2008). 2008 KIDS COUNT data book: State profiles of child well-being. Baltimore: The Annie E. Casey Foundation. 12. Hamilton BE, Martin JA, Ventura SJ. Births: Preliminary data for 2006. National vital statistics reports; vol 56 no 7. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2007. 4 12 4 3 in 10 girls get pregnant at least once before age 20 highest rates of teen pregnancy, births, and abortion in the industrialized world highest rates of STDs in the world In the world,
the United States: costs American taxpayers $6.5 billion annually in the treatment of new cases of STIs The poverty rate for children born to teen mothers who have never married and have not graduated from high school is 78 % 3. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2006). Kids Count Online Database. http://www.kidscount.org/sld/compare_results.jsp?i=20. $5.7 billion spent on teen births throughout the last decade on: 18. National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “By the Numbers: The Public Costs of Teen Childbearing in Georgia.” (2006). Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. "You cannot fully engage the issue of poverty or academic underachievement without addressing teen pregnancy" Kim Nolte, VP of the National Center for Health Statistics public health care
welfare services
foster care
lost tax revenue from decreased earning and spending 3 18 some form of sexual content such appear in 70% of all television programs (16) 16. Kunkel, D., Eyal, K., Finnerty, K., Biely, E., & Donnerstein, E. (2005). Sex on TV 4. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation. By the time adolescents graduate from high school, they will have spent 15, 000 hours watching television, compared with 12, 000 hours spent in the classroom (31) 31. Victor C. Strasburger and The Council on Communications and Media Pediatrics 2010 126: 576-582. Shows the emotional and social consequences of sexual activity such as guilt or disappointment, but less frequently show adverse physical consequences such as pregnancy or STIs (23). 23. Sheeran, P., Abraham, C., & Orbell, S. (1999). Psychosocial correlates of heterosexual condom use: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 125, 90–132 young women actively sought out sexual content in the media as a means of “learning the rules, rituals, and skills” of romance and relationships (11). 11. Gruber, Enid. Adolescent sexuality and the media: a review of current knowledge and implications West J Med 2000;172:210–214 based on:
Social Learning Theory
Social Influence Theory
Cognitive-Behavioral Theory sixteen 45 minute lessons that emphasize refusal statements, delay statements and alternative actions recognized by:
Advocates for Youth
National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
CDC Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention Results:
1) increased parent-child communication about abstinence and contraception,

2) delayed initiation of sexual intercourse,

3) reduced incidence of unprotected sex/increased use of contraception located off 575 North
Canton Median Household Income: $72,148
28.4% are high school graduates Feb 8-March 8, 2011 Group 2: Demographics Group 2 key informant interviews:
Stacy Cooper, director
JoNell Courson, director Group 1
3-7 participants
10-15 years old
7 sessions 1.5 hrs Group 2
3-9 participants
15-21 years old
4 sessions 1.5 hrs Attendance:
2 students attended 4
3 students attended 3 Overall Post test knowledge increased by 50% , p = 0.13 Limitations Strengths use site in future
respect and trust Overall Post test knowledge increased by 39%, p=.001
1. Alford S. Science and Success, Second Edition: Sex Education and Other Programs That Work to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, HIV & Sexually Transmitted Infections. Washington, DC: Advocates for Youth, 2008.

2. Alliance for Excellent Education. 2008. The High Cost of High School Dropouts: What the Nation Pays for Inadequate High Schools. Washington, DC: Author.

3. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2006). Kids Count Online Database. http://www.kidscount.org/sld/compare_results.jsp?i=20.

4. The Annie E. Casey Foundation. (2008). 2008 KIDS COUNT data book: State profiles of child well-being. Baltimore: The Annie E. Casey Foundation.

5. Brown, J., L’Engle, K. L., Pardun, C. J., Guo, G., Kenneavy, K., & Jackson, C. (2006). Sexy media matter: Exposure to sexual content in music, movies, television, and magazines predicts Black and White adolescents’ sexual behavior. Pediatrics, 117, 1018–1027.

6. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Table A-4: Employment Status of the Civilian Population 25 Years and Over by Educational Attainment, http://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t04.htm (accessed August 10, 2009).

7. Chandra, A., Martino, S. C., Collins, R. L., Elliott, M. N., Berry, S. H., Kanouse, D. E., & Miu, A. (2008). Does watching sex on television predict teen pregnancy? Findings from a national longitudinal survey of youth. Pediatrics, 122, 1047–1054.

8. Collins, R. L., Elliott, M. N., Berry, S. H., Kanouse, D. E., Kunkel, D., Hunter, S. B., & Miu, A. (2004). Watching sex on television predicts adolescent initiation of sexual behavior. Pediatrics, 114, e280–e289.

9. Editorial Projects in Education. (2009). Diplomas count 2009. Broader horizons: The challenge of college readiness for all students. Education Week, 28(34).

10. Freudenberg N, Ruglis J. Reframing school dropout as a public health issue. Prev Chronic Dis 2007;4(4). http://www.cdc.gov/pcd/issues/2007/oct/07_0063.htm. Accessed November 23, 2008.

11. Gruber, Enid. Adolescent sexuality and the media: a review of current knowledge and implications West J Med 2000;172:210–214

12. Hamilton BE, Martin JA, Ventura SJ. Births: Preliminary data for 2006. National vital statistics reports; vol 56 no 7. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2007.

13. Introduction to SAS. UCLA: Academic Technology Services, Statistical Consulting Group. from http://www.ats.ucla.edu/stat/sas/notes2/

14. Kirby D, Barth RP, Leland N et al. Reducing the Risk: impact of a new curriculum on sexual risk-taking. Family Planning Perspectives 1991; 23:253-263.

15. Kirby D, Lepore G, Ryan J. Sexual risk and protective factors. The National Campaign to Prevent Teens Pregnancy. ETR Associates, 2005.

16. Kunkel, D., Eyal, K., Finnerty, K., Biely, E., & Donnerstein, E. (2005). Sex on TV 4. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation.

17. Manlove, J, Romano-Papillo, A., & Ikramullah, E. (2004). Not yet: Programs to delay first sex among teens. Washington, DC: National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

18. National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. “By the Numbers: The Public Costs of Teen Childbearing in Georgia.” (2006). Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

19. National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. (2008). National Data.

20. National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. (2002). Not Just another Single Issue: Teen Pregnancy Prevention’s Link to Other Critical Social Issues. Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

21. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy. What If: How Declines in Teen Births Have Improved Poverty and Child Well-Being in Georgia. (2005). Washington, DC: The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

22. Roberts, D. F., Henriksen, L., & Foehr, U. G. (2009). Adolescence, adolescents, and media. In R. M. Lerner & L. Steinberg (Eds.), Handbook of adolescent psychology (3rd ed., Vol. 2, pp. 314–344). New York, NY: Wiley.

23. Sheeran, P., Abraham, C., & Orbell, S. (1999). Psychosocial correlates of heterosexual condom use: A meta-analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 125, 90–132

24. Steinberg, L., & Monahan, K. C. (2010, August 2). Adolescents' Exposure to Sexy Media Does Not Hasten the Initiation of Sexual Intercourse. Developmental Psychology. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/a0020613

25. Swanson CB. Who graduates? Who doesn’t? A statistical portrait of public high school graduation, class of 2001. Washington (DC): The Urban Institute; 2004. http://www.urban.org/UploadedPDF/410934_WhoGraduates.pdf

26. Teen Pregnancy: Improving the Lives of Young People and Strengthening Communities by Reducing Teen Pregnancy

27. At A Glance 2011. CDC, National Center for Health Statistics 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/chronicdisease/resources/publications/aag/teen-preg.htm

28. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census. 2007. 2006 Current Population Survey: Educational Attainment in the United States, Table 9. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.

29. U.S. Department of Labor. 2008. America's Dynamic Workforce. Washington, DC: Author.

30. Ventura SJ, Hamilton BE. U.S. teenage birth rate resumes decline. NCHS data brief, no 58. Hyattsville, MD: National Center for Health Statistics. 2011.

31. Victor C. Strasburger and The Council on Communications and Media Pediatrics 2010 126: 576-582.
References: Sex in the Media
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