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Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Seneca Falls Keynote Address

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Nicole Hetrick

on 5 February 2016

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Transcript of Elizabeth Cady Stanton's Seneca Falls Keynote Address

Elizabeth Cady Stanton's
Seneca Falls Keynote Address

By: Nicole Hetrick
Details of the Speech
Background of Elizabeth Cady Stanton
Time in History
Historical Events Inspiring the Speech
Rhetorical Devices
audience of around 150 woman
Seneca Falls, New York
July 19, 1848

woman suffrage leader
refined, educated, white woman
formed the National Women’s Loyal League with Susan B. Anthony
created Declaration of Sentiments

women had few rights
were dependent, subservient, and unequal
husbands owned all items belonging to their wife
1792- establishes first institution in America for education of women
1838- Kentucky widows with children in school can vote in school elections scholastic
Historical Events (continued)
July 13, 1848: a two-day meeting to discuss women's rights.
planned the first Women's Rights Convention
at the first Women's Rights Convention
use of "we", "our", and "us"
"But
we
are assembled to protest against a form of government existing without the consent of the governed"
"... the weight of argument lies wholly with
us
"
"The right is
ours
"
Effect on the Audience
sense of unity in fighting for their rights
to feel equal to Stanton
identifies it is a problem for all of them
"We need not prove ourselves equal to Daniel Webster to enjoy this privilege, for the ignorant Irishman in the ditch has all the civil rights he has"
Effect on the Audience
understanding they should not have to prove themselves
rids the opinions forced on by society
born with the civil rights
Effect on the Audience
angered by this insult
drives their desire
Allusion
"And it shall come to pass afterward, that I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and
your sons and your daughters
shall prophesy."
"But to have drunkards, idiots, horse-racing, rum-selling rowdies, ignorant foreigners, and
silly boys fully recognized,
while
we ourselves are thrust out from all the rights that belong to citizens
, it is too grossly insulting to the dignity of woman to be longer quietly submitted to"
from the
Bible
Joel 2:28
Effect on the Audience
proved God believes in equality
God is always right
justifies fighting for their rights
How the Speech Shaped American Society
started the Women's Rights Movement
68 women and 32 men signed the Declaration of Sentiments
How It Shaped American Society (continued)
laws protecting the rights of married women
eventually gained the right to vote
rights for divorced women
("Young Elizabeth Cady Stanton")

("Women at the Seneca Falls Convention.")
("Elizabeth Cady Stanton seated next to Susan B. Anthony.")
(“Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.”)
("Women Unity.")
("The Holy Bible.")

(“Votes for Women a Success.”)
(“Cady B. Stanton at Seneca Falls.”)
(Eisenberg and Ruthsdotter)
( “Important Dates in U.S. Women’s History.”)
(Brown)
(“Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Seneca Falls Keynote Address.” )
(“Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Seneca Falls Keynote Address.”)
(“Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Seneca Falls Keynote Address.”)
(“Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Seneca Falls Keynote Address.”)
First Person Pronouns
Appeal to Logic
Appeal to Pathos
women have better qualities
foreign men have more rights
("Early Women Education")
("Women Learning to Vote")
("Declaration of Sentiments")
Works Cited
Brown, Deborah. “Seneca Falls Convention Began Women’s Rights Movement.” IIP Digital. IIP Digital, n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2016
<http://iipdigital.usembassy.gov/st/english/article/2008/02/20080229183432liameruoy0.6444055.html#axzz3yVIVFqTU>.
“Cady B. Stanton at Seneca Falls.” Rhetorical Delivery. Rhetorical Delivery, n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://rhetoricaldelivery.weebly.com/cady-b-stanton-seneca-falls-keynote-address.html>.
Cokely, Carrie. “Declaration of Sentiments.” Encyclopaedia Britannica. Encyclopaedia Britannica, n.d. Web. 24 Jan. 2016
<http://www.britannica.com/topic/Declaration-of-Sentiments> .
“Declaration of Sentiments.” Tiki-Toki. n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2016
<http://www.tiki-toki.com/timeline/entry/241902/Elizabeth-Cady-Stanton/#vars!date=1859-05-29_15:03:54!>.
“Early Women Education.” Harvard Business School. n.d. Web. 29 Jan. 2016
<http://www.library.hbs.edu/hc/wbe/exhibit_introduction.html>.
Eisenberg, Bonnie and Mary Ruthsdotter. “History of the Women’s Rights Movement.” National Women’s History Project. National Women’s History Project, n.d. Web. 25 Jan. 2016
<http://www.nwhp.org/resources/womens-rights-movement/history-of-the-womens-rights-movement/>.
“Elizabeth Cady Stanton.” History. History, n.d. Web. 23 Jan. 2016
<http://www.history.com/topics/womens-history/elizabeth-cady-stanton>.
“Elizabeth Cady Stanton Seated Beside Susan B. Anthony.” Britannica. n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://www.britannica.com/biography/Elizabeth-Cady-Stanton>.

“Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Seneca Falls Keynote Address.” Great American Documents. Great American Documents, n.d. Web. 23 Jan. 2016
<http://www.greatamericandocuments.com/speeches/stanton-seneca-falls.html>.
“Important Dates in U.S. Women’s History.” Scholastic. Scholastic, n.d. Web. 24 Jan. 2016
<http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/important-dates-us-womens-history>.
“Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.” Genius. n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://genius.com/2126983>.
“Suffrage Parade in New York city.” Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2016
<http://hmhinthenews.com/national-womens-history-month-2/>.
“The Holy Bible.” April Laugh. n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2016
<http://aprillaugh.net/2016/01/25/reading-the-bible-in-a-year/>.
“The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848-1920.” History, Art & Archives. History, Art & Archives, n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/WIC/Historical-Essays/No-Lady/Womens-Rights/>
“Women at the Seneca Falls Convention.” Weebly. n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://sfcboyll.weebly.com/references.html>.
“Women Learning to Vote.” Wikipedia. n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2016
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women%27s_suffrage_in_the_United_States>.
“Women Unity.” Starving Our Insecurity. n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://starvingourinsecurities.blogspot.com/2014/01/weigh-in-on-my-life.htmleferent_id=2126983>.
“Votes for Women a Success.” Bettina Gordon. n.d. Web. 26 Jan. 2016
<http://www.bettinagordon.com/thank-you-to-all-our-fiery-women-ancestors/>.

“Young Elizabeth Cady Stanton.” Weebly. n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2016
<http://sfcboyll.weebly.com/stanton.html>

(“The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848-1920.”)
(“The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848-1920.”)
(Eisenberg and Ruthsdotter)
(Eisenberg and Ruthsdotter)
(Eisenberg and Ruthsdotter)
(Eisenberg and Ruthsdotter)
(“Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Seneca Falls Keynote Address.”)
gradually allowed to speak in public
(Brown)
Full transcript