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Welcome to Student Leading!

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on 19 August 2016

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Transcript of Welcome to Student Leading!

~ Project Dragonfly ~
Get to know the instructor!
From students . . .
Defining the role of student leader
Personalizing the web classroom
Welcome to
Student Leading!

Just remember to . . .
Be flexible.

Accept that the experience WILL alter your perspective, and don’t feel guilty about that – it’s how we grow.

~Stephanie Zaborac-Reed
Good Luck!!
Melany Sutherland
Student Leader for CSC
suthermr@miamioh.edu

Elizabeth (Betsy) Gaither
Student Leader for BAT
gaithee@miamioh.edu

Office Hours
Set aside “office hours” so you can respond to people by a set date.
~Lindsey Collinsworth

But try to be accommodating . . .

... if at all possible for the student leader, ... understand that people will not always request help during office hours ....
~Amy Geibel
Finding the time!
Managing your time is the first hurdle!

You can spend as much or as little time as your schedule allows on working with your class. Plan to spend at least a couple hours each week reading and responding to posts as needed. You will likely be most busy around major deadlines.

Try to check the web classroom daily.
This will allow you to monitor the class routinely and to respond to any questions in a timely manner.

An Instructor's Perspective
The most helpful thing for me that student leaders did was to give feedback to major projects at the same time that peers respond so that by the time that I look over their project, the student has had a chance to edit and improve initial projects.

I love when student leaders ask thoughtful questions to students in the class that encourage further thinking, learning, and inquiry.

A rule of thumb that I gave to my student leaders was to set aside some time each day to check and respond to emails. It's a lot of work, but I feel like it is important to students to receive immediate feedback to questions or concerns that they have.
~Lindsey Hagen
Instructor

Reach out to the instructor and see exactly what is expected…so you can exceed that mark.
~Jacqueline Christakis
Student Leader

Talk over the phone with the teacher you will be working with to define your role and what you want to get out of this opportunity.
~Lindsey Collinsworth
Student Leader

Communicate with the course facilitator on a weekly (if not more) basis. This will enhance the experience for you and the students you are leading.
~Elizabeth Gaither
Student Leader

I liked that my student leader reached out to me at the beginning of class to find out how he could best help me.
~Kathayoon Khalil
Instructor
I view student leaders as a valuable and important asset to these online courses, especially for those who are still "getting into the swing of things" with the online class format. Student leaders can help relate to others and offer advice as needed.
~Amy Geibel
GFP Student

I remember (my student leader) sharing resources like examples of her own projects . . . which was really helpful. Basically she was more of a mentor in the program as a whole rather than just helping out with the specific class where she was the student leader.
~Lauren Sabo

AIP Student

I think the best student leaders were the ones who commented on posts with helpful information like examples of ways to correct and gave me a direction to continue my research or subject . . . . The student leaders that I enjoyed would lead the discussion in a different direction than it was going especially because there was a tendency for redundancy . . . .
~Erin Carey

GFP Student
Sharing resources
Expect to be Challenged!
... when I first joined the program, I really didn't know what a student leader did and what the reasoning behind them was . . . . (They should) give a good explanation why they are partaking in the class' discussions.
~Jamie Herget
Confidently share your thoughts, ideas, and resources (videos, articles, etc.). Have a clear voice from day one. (You want your virtual presence to be known.)
~Elizabeth Gaither
Use google chat to help answer questions. Open the Doc students will look at for their project and offer assistance. I found this a great and quick way to interact with students.
~Lindsey Collinsworth
Congratulations on being selected to Student Lead a class for Project Dragonfly!

This will be an amazing learning experience. It is a wonderful opportunity to learn about leading in a web-based classroom. It is also a great way to find your own voice and connect with students
in a new and different way.

Ultimately, we hope this will be a very rewarding experience! Enjoy!
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