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Sonnet 3 by: Francesco Petrach

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by

Olivia Baker

on 28 January 2015

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Transcript of Sonnet 3 by: Francesco Petrach

Rhyme Scheme
Type of Sonnet
Italian
The turn
Theme
Love
Olivia Baker, Katie Schoenbachler, Drew Beckman
Sonnet 3 by: Francesco Petrarch
Of your swift eyes; that seemed no time to stay
The strokes of Love: I stepped into the snare
Secure, with no suspicion: then and there
I found my cue in man's most tragic play.
Love caught me naked to his shaft, his sheaf,
The entrance for his ambush and surprise
Against the hearts open through the eyes,
The constant gate and fountain of my grief:
How craven so to strike me stricken so,
Yet from you fully armed conceal his bow!

I fell a captive, Lady, to the sway
It was the morning of that blessed day
Whereon the Sun in pity veiled its glare
For the Lord's agony, that, unaware,
It was the morning of that blessed day
Whereon the Sun in pity veiled its glare
For the Lord's agony, that, unaware,
I fell a captive, Lady, to the sway
Of your swift eyes; that seemed no time to stay
The strokes of Love: I stepped into the snare
Secure, with no suspicion: then and there
I found my cue in man's most tragic
play.
Love caught me naked to his shaft, his
sheaf,
The entrance for his ambush and surprise
Against the hearts open through the eyes,
The constant gate and fountain of my grief:
How craven so to strike me stricken so,
Yet from you fully armed conceal his bow!
Info on the Author
He was an Italian scholar and poet in Renaissance Italy, and one of the earliest humanists.
Petrarch's rediscovery of Cicero's letters is often credited for initiating the 14th-century Renaissance. Petrarch is often called the "Father of Humanism".
Petrarch's sonnets were admired and imitated throughout Europe during the Renaissance and became a model for lyrical poetry. He is also known for being the first to develop the concept of the "Dark Ages".
Petrarch was an enthusiastic Latin scholar and did most of his writing in this language.
His Latin writings include scholarly works, introspective essays, letters, and more poetry.

Quatrains
It was the morning of that blessed day
Whereon the Sun in pity veiled its glare
For the Lord's agony, that, unaware,
I fell a captive, Lady, to the sway

Of your swift eyes; that seemed no time to stay
The strokes of Love: I stepped into the snare
Secure, with no suspicion: then and there
I found my cue in man's most tragic play.

Love caught me naked to his shaft, his sheaf,
The entrance for his ambush and surprise
Against the hearts open through the eyes,
The constant gate and fountain of my grief:

How craven so to strike me stricken so,
Yet from you fully armed conceal his bow!
ABBAABBA CDDCEE
The author falls in love with a woman and her eyes. This love is an example of romantic love. The author is in love with the lady for who she is and not for anything else.
The turn takes place in line 8
The rhyme scheme changes as well as the mood. The mood darkens and intensifies after the turn.
or
Petrarchan
Which images remain in your mind after reading this sonnet?
We think of the author as a peasant falling in love with a queen who does not notice or think of him. The peasant is sad to know that they will never be together and wallows in his grief.
Couplet
What do you learn about the speaker in "Sonnet 3" and about the woman he loves?
Love took the speaker by suprise in "Sonnet 3". The speaker is too afraid to confront his lover. He is a coward.
In your judgment, why does each poem include references to death?
Poems are more interesting when they tell a story and have a ending, whether it is happy or sad. Death is a part of life and to us it feels like poetry is a work that expresses life and its different forms and meanings.
Questions
Full transcript