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The Great Gatsby

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Claire Lepsoe

on 26 February 2015

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Transcript of The Great Gatsby

The Great Gatsby - Chapters 7 & 8
“I couldn’t sleep all night.” (147)
Chapter 7
“curiosity about Gatsby was at its highest”
“Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall”
“The straw seats of the car hovered on the edge of combustion”
“What’ll we do with ourselves this afternoon? And the day after that, and the next thirty years?”
“You look so cool….You always look so cool”
Tom's “mouth opened a little, and he looked at Gatsby, and then back at Daisy as if he had just recognized her as some one he knew a long time ago”
“It was full of money – that was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals’ song of it…high in a white palace the king’s daughter, the golden girl…”
“And if it runs out I can stop at a drug-store. You can buy anything at a drug-store nowadays.”
“I think he was afraid they would dart down a side street & out of his life forever. But they didn’t”
“You’re wife doesn’t love you,” said Gatsby. “She’s never loved you. She loves me.”
"The 'death car' as the newspapers called it, didn't stop; it came out of the gathering darkness, wavered tragically for a moment, and then disappeared around
the next bend."
Chapter 7
pages 113-145
Conclusion
An extensive deal of foreshadowing reflects the events that occur on that day.
Gatsby's dream of being with Daisy is completely crushed.
Tensions between Tom & Gatsby are at an all time high.
Gatsby has been killed & George Wilson committed suicide.
Summary
Quotes
Claire & Emma
Gatsby ceases to throw his notorious parties because Daisy disapproves of them.
Gatsby fired & replaced his household staff in order to prevent gossip.
Gatsby & Nick go to lunch at the Buchanan's only to end up in the city where Daisy, Gatsby, & Tom have a major confrontation. At the end of the confrontation, Nick realizes that it is his 30th birthday.
Myrtle is killed, presumably by Gatsby.
Chapter 8
“His house never seemed so enormous to me as it did that night when we hunted through the great rooms for cigarettes. We pushed aside curtains that were like pavilions, and felt over innumerable feet of dark wall for electric light switches - once I tumbled with a sort of splash upon the keys of a ghostly piano.” (147)
“He couldn’t possibly leave Daisy until he knew what she was going to do. He was clutching at some last hope and I couldn’t bear to shake him free.” (148)
“She was the first “nice” girl he had ever known… He found her excitingly desirable.” (148)
“He had never seen such a beautiful house… There was a ripe mystery about it, a hint of bedrooms upstairs more beautiful and cool than other bedrooms, of gay radiant activities taking place through its corridors, and of romances that were not musty and laid away already in lavender, but fresh and breathing and redolent of this year’s shining motor cars and of dances whose flowers were scarcely withered.” (148-149)
“It excited him, too, that many men had already loved Daisy - it increased her value in his eyes.” (149)
“He might have despised himself for he had certainly taken her under false pretenses… he had deliberately given Daisy a sense of security; he let her believe that he was a person from much the same stratum as herself.” (149)
“But he didn’t despise himself and it didn’t turn out as he had imagined. He had intended, probably, to take what he could and go - but now he found that he had committed himself to the following of a grail. He knew that Daisy was extraordinary, but he didn’t realize just how extraordinary a “nice” girl could be.” (149)
“I can’t describe to you how surprised I was to find out I loved her… I even hoped for a while that she’d throw me over, but she didn’t, because she was in love with me too.” (150)
“He did extraordinarily well in the war.” (150)
“Her artificial world was redolent of orchids and pleasant, cheerful snobbery and orchestras which set the rhythm of the year, summing up the sadness and suggestiveness of life in new tunes… While fresh faces drifted here and there like rose petals blown by the sad horns around the floor.” (151)
“Daisy began to move again with the season.” (151)
“Of course she might have loved him just for a minute, when they were first married - and loved me more even then.” (152)
“‘They’re a rotten crowd.. You’re worth the whole damn bunch put together’… I’ve always been glad I said that. It was the only compliment I ever gave him, because I disapproved of him from beginning to end.” (154)
“I thought of the night when I first came to his ancestral home, three months before. The lawn and drive had been crowded with the faces of those who guessed at his corruption - and he stood on those steps, concealing his incorruptible dream, as he waved them goodbye.” (154)
‘Wilson’s incoherent putting changed - he grew quieter and began to talk about the yellow car.” (156)
“God sees everything” (160)
“Gatsby no longer cared. If that was true he must have felt that he had lost the old warm world, paid a high price for living too long with a single dream. He must have looked up at an unfamiliar sky through frightening leaves and shivered as he found what a grotesque thing a rose is how raw the sunlight was upon the scarcely created grass. A new world, material without being real, where poor ghosts, breathing dreams like air drifted fortuitously about… like that ashen, fantastic figure gliding toward him through the amorphous trees.” (161)
“The holocaust was complete.” (162)
Full transcript