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Word Museum - Skulk

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on 15 March 2016

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Transcript of Word Museum - Skulk

Skulk
Noun
A group of foxes
Skulk
Intransitive Verb
Sculkin
Sculke
Sculk
Sculck
Skulc
Skulk
Modern Usage
United Kingdom
Modern Usage
United States
Being on the down low
Chantal Gunn
Nathaniel Moorhouse

Word Museum
Scolk-
Scowk-
Scowlke
Scoulk
Scouke
Alternate Spellings
First recorded use in the 14th century
Noun. A person who skulks
Verb. To avoid work or responsibility; shirk; malinger
To move in a stealthy or sneaking fashion, so as to escape notice.

To hide or conceal oneself, to keep out of sight to avoid observation especially with some sinister motive or in fear of being discovered;

To hide, withdraw, or shelter oneself in a cowardly manner
Skulk
Definition
Scandinavian:

Norwegian
skulka
“lurk, lie watching”

Danish
skulke
& Swedish
skolka
“to shirk, play traunt
Origins
(Middle) English : a1330
E. E Psalter cxviii. 158
“I sagh wemmand and
skulked
awai”




a1615
G. Sandys Trav 217
“A Leopard that
skulkt
in the aforesaid thicket”
First Recorded English Use
From Thomas Jefferson’s Letter to Thomas Ritchie:

“Having found, from experience, that impeachment is an impractical thing, a mere scare-crow, they consider themselves secure for life; they
sculk
from responsibility to public opinion, the only remaining hold on them, under a practice first introduced into England by Lord Mansfield. An opinion is huddled up in conclave, perhaps by a majority of one, delivered as if unanimous, and with the silent acquiescence of lazy or timid associates, by a crafty chief judge, who sophisticates the law to his mind, by turn of his own reasoning.” (Gerhart, 460)
Quote It Completely

Connotations:
NINJA!
Aggressive
Creepy
Stalker
Indifferent
Shadows
Modern Usage
United States
“I tried to skulk out the window while my parents were sleeping so I could go to my friend’s house.”
Ordinary Conversation
Skulker noun
Skowke
A soldier who by feigned sickness, or other pretences evades his duty, a sailor who keeps below in time of danger; n the civil line, one who keeps out of the way, when work is to be done” (Grose, 1st ed.):1748
Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English
"He is always skulking around in everyone's business"
"Be wary of going home that way because I have seen individuals skulking around. "
"That guy skulking in a corner"
"Look at him just skulking around"
Staying around shadows; staying apart from people
Doing what you want without caring what other people are doing; set apart from people
Shadowing over something or someone
To linger or creep around' to balk at someone
Modern Usage
Skulk
References
Simpson, J. A., and E. S. C. Weiner. The Oxford English Dictionary. 2nd ed. Vol. XV. Oxford: Clarendon, 1989. 629-30. Print.


Partridge, Eric. A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English: Colloquialisms and Catch-phrases, Solecisms and Catachreses, Nicknames, and Vulgarisms. 8th ed. New York: Macmillan, 1984. 1081. Print.


Gerhart, Eugene C. "Skulk." Quote It Completely!: World Reference Guide to More than 5,500 Memorable Quotations from Law and Literature. Vol. 2. Buffalo, NY: W.S. Hein, 1998. Print
Amalgam Comic Character
Natural Selection Life Form
Dungeons and Dragons Piece
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