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The Reader Psychoanalytic Theory

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Amy Sahai

on 14 March 2013

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Transcript of The Reader Psychoanalytic Theory

THE MIRROR THE CHILD THE MOTHER ACCESSION TO THE SYMBOLIC DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURAL HIERARCHY THE READER Bernhard Schlink PSYCHOANALYTIC THEORY The Mother The Child The "Father" Recognizes a barrier between himself and his mother

Opens a new dynamic to the child's world, as he must compete for his mother's attention OEDIPUS COMPLEX Stage of development where the child is sexually attracted to his mother The child also perceives the father as a competitor for his mother's love Development of 2 Egos EGOS ID EGO SUPER EGO The pure desire of the unconscious. Results in primal behaviour Awareness of social/cultural expectations. State of consciousness Jacques Lacan The Oedipus Complex is a transitory stage where the child finds identity through language and symbolic order. does not have subjectivity or an identity of his own
identifies with his mother
blank slate
the child is not complete without the mother
nurtures the child
completed by the child Michael's actual mother was insignificant in his life, therefore Hanna takes on the role of his mother Berhnard Schlink, The Reader. Page 30 Hanna bathes him Hanna nurtures him Hanna's age Hanna encourages his education Hanna calls him kid They publicly identify as mother and son dual stage of the relationship where the child identifies as the object of his mother's desire. By taking possession, Michael completes Hanna's lack. Michael is initially underdeveloped, controlled by his Id ego Berhnard Schlink, The Reader. Page 20 "Id" is German for "It". Michael succumbs to his primal instinct. He continues to return to Hanna because he is controlled by his Id. He wants to complete her. Barrier between the dual relationship of the mother and child

Considered the "other"

Develops a cultural hierarchy The "father" within this novel is Hanna's involvement in Nazi Germany. Michael is physically separated from Hanna because of the "other" Berhard Schlink, The Reader. Page 134 Michael reflects on his relationship with Hanna and questions her motives. He realizes that there is a new dynamic to their relationship, as a number of her decisions were based on her involvement as an SS guard The "Law of the Father" - brings forth symbolic structure. Without this law, the relationship remains at the Mirror stage. In Oedipus terms, this law is "no incest". Berhard Schlink, The Reader. Page 91 Michael discovers the emergence of both the literal law and social norms. This law intervenes with Hanna's secret life, this illuminating the presence of the "other" Acceptance of the Law Oedipus Complex - everyone can breed with everyone. However, placing sexual restrictions defines a law

Internalizes cultural norms, which accepts them as inherent Berhnard Schlink, The Reader. Page 208. Hanna commits suicide after serving her time because accepts her punishment. Furthermore, she would be unable to adjust into society, thus she believes that killing herself is the societal expectation of her. Parallels between language and conscious thought Berhard Schlink, The Reader. Page 198-9. Language and culture go hand in hand. When Hanna was illiterate, she did not accept the law. She believed that her involvement in Nazi Germany and her relationship with Michael was acceptable. When Hanna became literate, she understood her crimes and deemed her relationship as unacceptable
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