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Sonnet 60

By William Shakespeare
by

Emily Noonan

on 18 January 2013

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Transcript of Sonnet 60

Sonnet 60 By William Shakespeare Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,
In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Nativity, once in the main of light,
Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crown'd,
Crooked eclipses 'gainst his glory fight,
And Time that gave doth now his gift confound.
Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth
And delves the parallels in beauty's brow,
Feeds on the rarities of nature's truth,
And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow:
And yet to times in hope, my verse shall stand
Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand. Sonnet 60 By William Shakespeare VOCABULARY Nativity: (noun) Event of Birth Delves: (v.) to search Scythe: (noun) a curved sword used for cutting crops Transfix: (noun) to make or hold motionless with amazement, awe, terror, etc. this represents youth on a figurative level this signifies Death claiming lives on a figurative level POETIC DEVICES Punctuation: Alliteration Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore,
So do our minutes hasten to their end;
Each changing place with that which goes before,
In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Nativity, once in the main of light,
Crawls to maturity, wherewith being crown'd,
Crooked eclipses 'gainst his glory fight,
And Time that gave doth now his gift confound.
Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth
And delves the parallels in beauty's brow,
Feeds on the rarities of nature's truth,
And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow:
And yet to times in hope, my verse shall stand
Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand. Sonnet 60 The author is using the comma here to compare waves crashing to time ending. "time doth transfix" (line 9) "beauty's brow" (line 10) Consonance "forwards do contend" (line 4) "sequent toil" (line 4) Simile "Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end..." (lines 1-2) Shakespeare uses a semi colon here to show that the waves crashing and the time passing are examples of how things are always changing like the different waves always crashing Shakespeare uses a period to end this thought about life time so he can continue onto another one. The waves coming towards the shore is being compared to our life ending and time running out. The waves cannot be controlled and they always come to the shore, similar to how you can't control time and how nothing can stop it from ending. This poem is about time. William Shakespeare explains that time is never stopping and cannot be controlled. he acknowledges that his works of writing will live on even after his inevitable death. saying that "And yet to times in hope my verse shall stand,/ praising my worth, despite his cruel hand". William Shakespeare's motivation for writing this poem could have been his sons early death or the realization that his own death was drawing closer. Meaning of the Poem Metaphor "And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow..." (line 12) This is a metaphor for death. "His scythe" represents the scythe that Death is depicted with and he uses to end lives. Personification "Nativity, once in the main of light, crawls to maturity..." (lines 5-6) "[Time] feeds on the rarities of natures truth..." (line 10) The two non-human things (Nativity and Time) are performing human actions by crawling and feeding. The author uses a comma here because he is starting a list about what life "does". Structure of the Sonnet: Theme The theme of Sonnet 60 is that no one can outrun time but he hopes he can along with his lover through his sonnets. I know this because the first two stanzas describe waves about to crash onto the shore and this is like our time coming to an end. Also he talks about how time isn't great to you because you eventually get old but he is telling his lover that his sonnets will keep them young and alive forever. Rhyme Scheme: a,b,a,b,c,d,c,d,e,f,e,f,g,g Simile: "Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end;" alliteration: "with that which" , "Crown'd, Crooked" , "Beauty's brow" Assonance: "his gift" Imagery: "Waves make towards the pebbled shore" I see waves crashing at the beach. This represents time ending for everyone (each wave)

"parallels in beauty's brow" I see an old woman with many wrinkles. This signifies the aging of people as their time runs out.

"scythe to mow" I see the Grimm Reaper. This represents when their time is up. These commas are there to separate the
actions of Time that are being listed. The colon here is used because it is introducing a list and if a comma had been used instead it would look as though the introduction statement was part of that list.
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