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The World is Too much with Us

Poesia Britànica - Universitat de Barcelona - Marta Ortega - 2012
by

Míriam Valls

on 30 October 2012

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Transcript of The World is Too much with Us

The World Is Too Much With Us The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers:
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune,
It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. The World Is Too Much With Us The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers:
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune,
It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. The World Is Too Much With Us The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers:
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers;
For this, for everything, we are out of tune,
It moves us not.--Great God! I'd rather be
A Pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathed horn. Formal Analysis Interpretation Rhyme scheme a
b
b
a
a
b
b
a
c
d
c
d
c
d Petrarchan Sonnet 14 lines 1st Stanza 2nd Stanza octave sestet 8+6 Composed on 1802
Industrial Revolution flourishing
'Materialism' theme engendered it
Published 1807 as part of 'Poems in Two Volumes' Collection Personification Hearts as the enthusiasm or life Oxymoron Metaphor Comparison of the winds to flowers Alliteration Sea as a mother
Moon as her child Simile tarnished blessing; shameful it juxtaposes contradictory words. Our objective in life seems to be acquiring goods. It has been a problem in the past, and it will be a problem in the future as well. Educated in an old-fashion religion. Greek mythology TRITON was a fish-tailed sea god, the son and herald of Poseidon, king of the seas. He stilled the waves with the blow of a conch-shell trumpet. A sea God who could change shape at will and who possessed complete knowledge of the past, present, and future. he wishes he sould have been raced as a pagan. too much materialism advice future generations? Angry request for the Wordsworthian theme Nature Why this sonnet is important?
Its rethorical force
Representative of other poems Bibliography Abrams, M. H. The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 6th ed. New York etc.: Norton, 1993. . Marc Format.

Alexander, Michael. A History of English Literature. 2nd ed. Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire; New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. . Marc Format.

Carter, Ronald, and John McRae. "The Romantic Age 1789 - 1831." The Penguin Guide to Literature in English; Britain and Ireland. 2001st ed. England: Pearson Education Limited, 1996. 103.

Davies, Hunter. William Wordsworth :A Biography. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1980. . Marc Format.

Mahoney, John L. William Wordsworth, the Poetic Life. Fordham University Press, 1997. . EBSCO. <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=16378&site=ehost-live&scope=site>. William Wordsworth
(1770-1850) Thanks for listening Worshiper of nature "Nature is a teacher whose wisdom we can learn if we will, and without wich any human life is vain and incomplete" "Every Great poet is a teacher: I wish either to be considered a teacher, or as nothing"
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