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Distracted Walking

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by

Denise Cline

on 19 April 2016

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Transcript of Distracted Walking

Distracted
Walking:
The Mobile
Phone

In the

1980s
only
340,000
people in the United States used

cell phones
By
2010
, over
302.9 million
people used the
mobile phone
Among these, almost
20%
of the deaths and
16,000
of the injuries were
young adults
(ages 16-29).
One's attention when using the phone is no longer focused on his surroundings as they should be when walking but on his phone.
That's right,
COLLEGE
STUDENTS!
In a survey of Miami students,
94%
of the randomly selected students reported
walking and using their phones
simultaneously.
This risky behavior leads to more
accidents
and
injuries
among pedestrians.
Over
half
of the
college-aged
students within this number own a
smart phone
In 2009 alone, there were
215,188
pedestrian

injuries

in

the US that required hospital treatment and

4,109 deaths
This may be good, but...
And that's where you are probably
wrong
These phone distractions are most common among
college-aged

students
who tend to be frequent pedestrians.
....all of these are
DISTRACTIONS

to a pedestrian.
A study
conducted at the University of Alabama found that

distracted pedestrians
when crossing the street only, "
move their heads
to look left and right before crossing, but
fail to actually capture and/or process the information
necessary to cross
safely
.”
Distracted pedestrians exhibit:
-
slower
walking
-
unawareness
to surroundings
-
lack of
peripheral vision
-
increased risk
to tripping
What's worse is that
over 60%
of these people have tried
crossing the street
while
using their phones.
A study done at
The Ohio State University
found that just within a
two year
time period (2006-2008) the
number
of pedestrians who
visited the emergency room
due to a
phone-related
accident

QUADRUPLED!
So what can
you
do to
prevent
this?
It's really
simple
actually.
PUT THE PHONE
AWAY
WHILE
WALKING
AND
CROSSING
THE STREET!
By doing this, you will be able to be
more aware
of your surroundings which will
promote
:
-an
increase
in
better decision-making
-a
decrease
in the amount of
injuries/accidents
among pedestrians.
Credits
Pictures
http://www.coolhdwallpapers.net/wallpapers/2013-smartphones-wallpaper
http://www.ericgarland.co/2011/12/28/positive-trends-in-2011/1980s-cell-phone/
http://www.coolhdwallpapers.net/wallpapers/2013-smartphones-wallpaper
http://technorati.com/business/article/why-small-businesses-cannot-be-scared/
Video
YouTube: ABC News--Texting While Walking Accidents: Video
Statistics
Byington, Katherine W., David C. Schwebel, and Despina Stayrinos. “Distracted Walking: Cell Phones Increase Injury Risk for College Pedestrians.” Journal of Safety Research. (42:101-107). April 2011. ERIC. EBSCO. Web. 6 Oct 2013.
Byington, Katherine W. and David C. Schwebel. “Effects of Mobile Internet Use on College Student Pedestrian Injury Risk.” Accident Analysis and Prevention. (51: 78-83). Mar 2013. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 6 Oct 2013.
Nasar, Derek and Jack L. Troyer. “Pedestrian Injuries Due to Mobile Phone Use In Public Places.” Accident Analysis and Prevention. (57:91– 95). March 2013. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 13 Oct 2013.
Dressel, Christen, Stacy M. Lopresti-Goodman, and Ana Rivera. “Practicing Safe Text: The Impact of Texting on Walking Behavior.” Applied Cognitive Psychology. May 2012. Academic Search Complete. EBSCO. Web. 13 Oct 2013.
Share
this information with
others!
YouTube-ABC News: Texting While Walking Accidents: Video
Full transcript