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Civic Mirror : Reflection and Connection

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Emma Kimmett

on 21 January 2014

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Transcript of Civic Mirror : Reflection and Connection

Civic Mirror : Reflection and Connection
1ntroduction
By participating in the civic mirror, I learned many things about law, government and human nature. I learned about how different it is to be living in a country that isn't like Canada, where laws aren't enforced to those in power, corruption is common and the majority of the country is below the poverty line.
Lesson #4
Another very important aspect of civics that I learned was to get other people involved. It proved to be very difficult for me to achieve anything in the civic mirror because "The Boys" managed to get a lot of people to help them via bribery. It's vital that you have people to vouch for you and if you aren't encouraging them to participate they are less likely to do so. It's important to make contributions to your community that benefit people but also push them to make contributions of their own. When more people are involved it makes everything more interesting and when something is done, you can be sure that most people are happy with what's happening.
Lesson #2
Lesson # 1
Although everyone in the country of Jandillon had equal rights, they were never really practiced. The Boys governmental party had managed to get away with a lot before anybody took responsibility and tried to stop them. I learned that in certain countries where the government has a lot of control, it's easy for them to take rights away from people and make it so that they are in control of everything and nobody can touch them because of that.
Lesson #3
Lesson #5
The second lesson I learned by participating in the civic mirror regarded the relationship between people's values and their positions on civic issues. I learned that the decisions people make and the things the value are reflected in how they react to society. This relationship is important because in order to achieve the things you want to achieve, you need to have people that value the same things as you and are on the same side as you in terms of civic issues.
I think the most important lesson I learned in the civic mirror was the importance of participating. If you never speak up and fight for what you believe in, you make it easier for people to manipulate you and take things away from you. In the civic mirror, had I not fought against "The Boys" political party, they would have continued on taking everything for themselves and letting people die. The same goes for any government and any circumstance (it doesn't have to be life or death). If something in a society is unjust or wrong, it will continue on being so until someone tries to stop it. I also learned that there are many ways to participate, whether you run in an election or support a political party or even use the court system or lobbying. There are endless possibilities.
Finally, I learned about the many ways to voice your opinion on social injustice and how some people's perspectives are valued more than that of others. What I mean by this is that it's easier for some people to get the things they want, as their opinions are that of the majority. However, more importantly I learned that you can be heard in many ways even if you don't have the majority or any power. It's important to know how to get your opinion out there, and through the civic mirror I learned that I can voice my opinion in a variety of ways such as protesting, lobbying and participating in court.
In conclusion, the civic mirror taught me many things about law, the government and human nature. It helped me grasp a further understanding of life in a country different from Canada. It taught me the importance of taking action and helping others take action.
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