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Elephants

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by

Amy Wolpert

on 1 November 2013

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Transcript of Elephants

Elephants
Earliest Most Common Ancestor: Primelephas
ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS
Adaptations probably will not change, but since the elephant isn't so used to cold weather, it may be hard to get what they need to eat since the foods would be different in cold weather then what they are used to eating in hot weather.
The Basics
:
Primelephas were the earliest most commonly traced ancestors that came approx. 7 million years ago.
Fun Fact:
They were called "Primelephas" because primelephas means "The First Elephant"
Where do they live?
Elephants live in approx. 37 African countries. They live in many habitats that are tropical forests, savannas, grasslands, and woodlands.
What They Look Like
Adaptations:
Grey, Wrinkled Skin
4 foot long tail
5 toes but only 3 nails on hind feet
5 toes and nails on front feet
trunk (long nose used for smelling, breathing, drinking)
mouth
tusks
large eyes
huge ears shaped like Africa.
Primelephas Adaptations:
Tusks in both upper and lower jaw
increased number of molar ridges (capable of grinding up rough vegetation)
Long trunk
Natural
or
A
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i
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i
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?

Who's Related to who?
What about in 100 Years?
I Predict that their skin will change since every hundred years or so the skin on this animal does change.
This information
was from seaworld.com
This information is from
http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mammal/mesaxonia/elephantinae.php


Natural! Over time, Elephants have
different types of skin.

Now: Wrinkled, Sparse Skin
Ancestors: Dense Skin
Studies show that the Mammoth and the Asian Elephant are very closely related. But the African Elephant branched off first.
Common: Elephant
Scientific: Elephantidae
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Proboscidae
Family: Elephantidae
Genus: Loxodonta
Species: Africana

The Evolution of
By Amy Wolpert
Big Ears
long nose
Tusks
Full transcript