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Report Writing WBHM

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Torrens University

on 9 September 2016

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Transcript of Report Writing WBHM

Although distance may influence the destination of choice in an economic downturn, the remoteness of Australia results in tourists spending on average three times as much time as they normally spend visiting a single country, the exception being visits to the USA. The reason for the triple expenditure is the plethora of attractions (Tourism Research Australia 2009a, p.65) with Sydney accounting for the highest international visitor expenditure in the top 20 regions (Tourism Research Australia 2009b).
(Tourism Research Australia 2011)
LASU
Report Writing
Example

Table of contents


Executive Summary 4
1.0 Introduction 5
2.0 Contributing and detracting aspects of
Australia’s appeal to tourists 5
2.1 Landscape 5
2.2 Wildlife 5
2.3 Distance 6
3.0. Conclusion 7
References 8
Appendices 11
Appendix A:
Visitors by type of native activity
(Tourism Research Australia 2008)
The brief
Australia’s tourism industry is the third largest in the country in terms of contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Much of its success is due to Australia’s unique geography. Analyse the geographical factors that both contribute to and hinder the success of tourism in Australia.
Adapted from Queensland University Library n.d. Writing structure Overview, Available: www.studywell.library.qut.edu.au (accessed 20/8/2011).
1.0 Introduction
Australia’s tourism industry contributes 3.9% of the country’s gross domestic product and Australia has been in the top ten of most desirable places to go on holiday 2000-2004 (Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism (Tourism Research Australia 2009b). There are many reasons for this success but two major factors are Australia’s distinctive geography, particularly its unusual landforms (Bouwer 2007) and unique flora and fauna. However, a complication for the success of Australian tourism is the tyranny of distance and the high costs involved for travellers, particularly those from the Northern hemisphere (Proctor & Thomas 2004). The contributing and detracting aspects of the three geographic factors landscape, wildlife and distance are analysed in the context of their role in the tourism industry. Although logistical concerns warrant consideration, the value of the unique geography and wildlife outweigh the difficulties of Australia’s remote location.
3.0 Conclusion
Australia’s isolation may not negatively impact tourist numbers as much as first considered. It is a destination of choice with remoteness as a positive reason to travel to Australia where visitors experience a multitude of unique geographic features in one visit. Added to the attraction are the unique flora and fauna in their natural settings and in wildlife parks. Though Australia may get fewer visitors in total in a global financial crisis, each visitor invests more in and during their stay than in most other countries. It is evident on a range of measures that Australia’s unique plants and animals, as well as its geography, strongly influence tourist interest in visiting Australia.
Title page

Australia’s Tourism Industry




Student name, student number

Lecturer
Subject
Date
Executive summary
Australia’s abundant and unique geographical features make it a top ten
tourist destination. Tourists visit Australia for its landforms, beaches and
rainforests, and are attracted by Australia’s distinctive wildlife both in the
wild and within zoological gardens.
An analysis of the contributing and
detracting aspects of the three geographic factors landscape, wildlife and
distance to the succes of tourism
, show that, even though Australia is one of the more remote tourist locations on earth, this distance offers an additional component to a traveller's experience and sense of adventure.
This is reflected in the contribution to Australia’s gross domestic product; the tourism industry’s proportion is 3.9%. Australia’s tourism success can be contributed to its geographic features, namely geology, ecology, and topography, that set it apart from other destinations. While the distance from other countries mostly enhances the unique travelling experience offered by the land ‘Down Under', it is vulnerable to global economic pressures. A reduction in possible visitor numbers, however, is offset by an average of triple expenditure per visit compared to other destinations.
2.0 Contributing and detracting aspects of Australia’s appeal to tourists
2.1 Landscape

Australia’s unique geological features and ecology are key components of Australia’s appeal to tourists; Australia’s Tourism Commissioner states that 87% of tourists (2000-2004) cited extraordinary natural phenomena as a significant motivating reason for their visit to Australia (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). Australia’s favourite destinations include Uluru, beaches and tropical rainforests. Uluru is the world’s largest monolith (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). This formation is so rare that the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is one of the few World Heritage properties listed for both its natural and cultural values (Bouwer 2007, p.21). Australia has over 10,000 miles of white sandy beaches, some of the world’s best surfing conditions, and a climate that allows comfortable swimming throughout the year (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). Australia’s tropical north offers some of the most pristine wilderness left in the world; for example, The Cape York Peninsula is approximately the size of England, Scotland and Wales (137,000 km²), but has only 18,000 residents (Bouwer 2007).
2.2 Wild life

Not only landforms but also distinctive plants and animals draw tourists to Australia. Australia is home to one million unique species of flora and fauna, many of which are yet to be described scientifically (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). Tourists enjoy Australia’s wildlife in both natural settings and wildlife parks.
One such World Heritage listed site, The Great Barrier Reef is the 2nd most popular tourist destination in Australia. The reef is the largest coral reef in the world, home to 1,500 unique species of tropical fish, 400 species of coral and numerous species of whales, birds, sharks, sea snakes, marine algae and invertebrates. Tropical rainforests in far north Queensland and the Northern Territory are home to 2,500 species of higher plants and attract 26% of tourist spending (Bouwer 2007, p.5, p.43).

Taronga Zoo and Darling Harbour Aquarium are another two of the most profitable tourist attractions in Australia with the attraction to animals confirmed in a study with Australia Post, which found postcards featuring Australian animals were sent overseas more frequently than all other postcard types combined (Zeehan 2008, p.51, as cited in Tourism Research Australia 2008). Overall, in 2007, nearly 1 million international visitors visited wildlife parks and zoos, or went snorkelling and scuba diving (Tourism Research Australia 2008, see Appendix A). Though wildlife is an attraction, the Australian animals are not solely found in Australia. International zoos frequently enable people to see Australian wildlife without leaving their home countries (Proctor & Thomas 2004, p.37).
2.3 Distance

While Australia’s geography accounts for much of its success as a tourist destination, it is also one of the most remote countries on earth; its great distance from countries with affluent populations can be an inhibiting factor for the success of the tourist industry. In times of economic downturn, the distance makes the tourism industry vulnerable when fewer overseas tourists make hotel bookings and the number of visits to local attractions drops. The executive director of the Tourism and Transport Forum, Ms Olivia Worth (as cited in Irvine 2009), states that at the time of a global financial crises “the decline was likely to worsen for the tourism industry, which employs half a million people nationally and contributes $81 billion a year to the economy”. Bill Healey, the director of national affairs at the Australian Hotels Association (as cited in Irvine 2009), confirmed that four- and five-star hotels were affected by the current decline.

Both the proximity and the availability of other competing destinations put pressure on the Australian tourism industry. Overseas visitors take an average of 17 hours to reach Australia, twice as long as travel to other geographically unique locations (Proctor & Thomas 2004, p.35). Physical landmarks such as The Grand Canyon, Mount Fuji and the Amazon Rainforest are all more accessible than Uluru for the majority of world travellers (Proctor & Thomas, 2004 p.36). This downward pressure is illustrated in Table 1 below, which shows that less international visitors chose to visit Australia for leisure in the last year (Tourism Research Australia 2011) and a decline of 6.7% from 2010 to 2011.
language and Academic Skills Unit
A report

A report presents information as briefly and clearly as possible. Reports should be easy to read and divided by headings into obvious sections. Always check with your lecturer or tutor for the specific structure required.
The brief

The brief contains key words that will help you complete the assignment task. You can break down the brief into these main words.
Content words
Australia’s tourism industry is the third largest in the country in terms of contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Much of its success is due to Australia’s unique geography. Analyse the geographical factors that both contribute to and hinder the success of tourism in Australia.
Instruction words
Australia’s tourism industry is the third largest in the country in terms of contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Much of its success is due to Australia’s unique geography. Analyse the geographical factors that both contribute to and hinder the success of tourism in Australia.
Limiting words
Australia’s tourism industry is the third largest in the country in terms of contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Much of its success is due to Australia’s unique geography. Analyse the geographical factors that both contribute to and hinder the success of tourism in Australia.
Context
Australia’s tourism industry is the third largest in the country in terms of contribution to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Much of its success is due to Australia’s unique geography. Analyse the geographical factors that both contribute to and hinder the success of tourism in Australia.
Title Page

The title page should include:
the title and the subject of the report;
your name and student number;
the name of your tutor or lecturer; and
the subject and submission date
Executive Summary

The executive summary gives an overview of the entire report including the purpose, method, findings, conclusions and recommendations. The executive summary is usually placed between the contents page and the introduction (but check your brief and marking criteria). It is best to write the executive summary last.
The introduction

The introduction should state the importance/purpose of the assignment and define the scope or range of the report. It should also give an outline of the issues under investigation and inform the reader of any limitations or assumptions made with the research. It needs to include an opinion statement, also called outcome/thesis statement.
The Table of Contents

The Table of Contents lists the headings and subheadings of the report along with the page numbers where the sections can be found.
A next table may include a Table of Figures, which an executive (senior manager) may use to get a quick overview of data.
Background
Purpose
Findings
Conclusion
Recommendation
Australia’s abundant and unique geographical features make it a top ten
tourist destination. Tourists visit Australia for its landforms, beaches and
rainforests, and are attracted by Australia’s distinctive wildlife both in the
wild and within zoological gardens. An analysis of the contributing and
detracting aspects of the three geographic factors landscape, wildlife and
distance show that, even though Australia is one of the more remote
tourist locations on earth, this distance offers an additional component to a traveller's experience and sense of adventure. This is reflected in the
contribution to Australia’s gross domestic product; the tourism industry’s
proportion is 3.9%. Australia’s tourism success can be contributed to its
Geographic features, namely geological, ecological, and topographically, that set it apart from other destinations. While the distance from other countries mostly enhances the unique travelling experience offered by the land ‘Down Under',it is vulnerable to global economic pressures. A reduction in possible visitor numbers, however, is offset by an average of triple expenditure per visit compared to other destinations.
Executive summary
Australia’s tourism industry contributes 3.9% of the country’s gross
domestic product and Australia has been in the top ten of most
desirable places to go on holiday 2000-2004 (Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism (Tourism Research Australia 2009b).
There are many reasons for this success but two major factors are Australia’s distinctive geography, particularly its unusual landforms (Bouwer 2007) and unique flora and fauna. However, a complication for the success of Australian tourism is the tyranny of distance and the high costs involved for travellers, particularly those from the Northern hemisphere (Proctor & Thomas 2004).
This report analyses the contributing and detracting aspects of the
three geographic factors, namely landscape, wildlife and distance
, in the context of their role in the tourism industry.

Although logistical concerns warrant consideration, the value of the unique geography and wildlife outweigh the difficulties of Australia’s remote location.
purpose
scope/limitations
outcome/ opinion statement
Body
The body of the report contains information, organised into sections with headings and subheadings followed by text, mostly organised into paragraphs. Visuals, such as figures and tables (numbered and with a title), can be added, too. The body of a report can include: what you investigated, what you found out, what interpretations you made and what you recommend.
2.0 Contributing and detracting aspects of Australia’s appeal to tourists

2.1 Landscape

Australia’s unique geological features and ecology are key components of Australia’s appeal to tourists; Australia’s Tourism Commissioner states that 87% of tourists (2000-2004) cited extraordinary natural phenomena as a significant motivating reason for their visit to Australia (Tourism Research Australia 2009a).
Australia’s favourite destinations include Uluru, beaches and tropical rainforests. Uluru is the world’s largest monolith (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). This formation is so rare that the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is one of the few World Heritage properties listed for both its natural and cultural values (Bouwer 2007, p.21). Australia has over 10,000 miles of white sandy beaches, some of the world’s best surfing conditions, and a climate that allows comfortable swimming throughout the year (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). Australia’s tropical north offers some of the most pristine wilderness left in the world; for example, The Cape York Peninsula is approximately the size of England, Scotland and Wales (137,000 km²), but has only 18,000 residents (Bouwer 2007).
headings & subheadings
main topic of the
paragraph
more detail/ findings,
backed up by evidence
2.2 Wild life

Not only landforms but also distinctive plants and animals draw tourists to Australia.

Australia is home to one million unique species of flora and fauna, many of which are yet to be described scientifically (Tourism Research Australia 2009a). Tourists enjoy Australia’s wildlife in both natural settings and wildlife parks
.
One such World Heritage listed site, The Great Barrier Reef is the 2nd most popular tourist destination in Australia. The reef is the largest coral reef in the world, home to 1,500 unique species of tropical fish, 400 species of coral and numerous species of whales, birds, sharks, sea snakes, marine algae and invertebrates. Tropical rainforests in far north Queensland and the Northern Territory are home to 2,500 species of higher plants and attract 26% of tourist spending (Bouwer 2007, p.5, p.43).

Taronga Zoo and Darling Harbour Aquarium are another two of the most profitable tourist attractions in Australia with the attraction to animals confirmed in a study with Australia Post, which found postcards featuring Australian animals were sent overseas more frequently than all other postcard types combined (Zeehan 2008, p.51, as cited in Tourism Research Australia 2008). Overall, in 2007, nearly 1 million international visitors visited wildlife parks and zoos, or went snorkelling and scuba diving (Tourism Research Australia 2008, see Appendix A). Though wildlife is an attraction, the Australian animals are not solely found in Australia. International zoos frequently enable people to see Australian wildlife without leaving their home countries (Proctor & Thomas 2004, p.37).
sub-heading
topic sentence
examples and evidence
2.3 Distance

While Australia’s geography accounts for much of its success as a tourist destination, it is also one of the most remote countries on earth; its great distance from countries with affluent populations can be an inhibiting factor for the success of the tourist industry.

In times of economic downturn, the distance makes the tourism industry vulnerable when fewer overseas tourists make hotel bookings and the number of visits to local attractions drops.

The executive director of the Tourism and Transport Forum, Ms Olivia Worth (as cited in Irvine 2009), states that at the time of a global financial crises “the decline was likely to worsen for the tourism industry, which employs half a million people nationally and contributes $81 billion a year to the economy”. Bill Healey, the director of national affairs at the Australian Hotels Association (as cited in Irvine 2009), confirmed that four- and five-star hotels were affected by the current decline.

Both the proximity and the availability of other competing destinations put pressure on the Australian tourism industry. Overseas visitors take an average of 17 hours to reach Australia, twice as long as travel to other geographically unique locations (Proctor & Thomas 2004, p.35). Physical landmarks such as The Grand Canyon, Mount Fuji and the Amazon Rainforest are all more accessible than Uluru for the majority of world travellers (Proctor & Thomas, 2004 p.36).
This downward pressure is illustrated in Table 1 below, which shows that less international visitors chose to visit Australia for leisure in the last year (Tourism Research Australia 2011) and a decline of 6.7% from 2010 to 2011.
Sub-heading
Background
Topic sentence
More supporting sentences: examples and evidence
Evidence
Transition sentence to link the information from this paragraph to the following paragraph.
(Tourism Research Australia 2011)
Although distance may influence the destination of choice in an economic downturn, the remoteness of Australia results in tourists spending on average three times as much time as they normally spend visiting a single country, the exception being visits to the USA.

The reason for the triple expenditure is the plethora of attractions (Tourism Research Australia 2009a, p.65) with Sydney accounting for the highest international visitor expenditure in the top 20 regions (Tourism Research Australia 2009b).
Table
Used to detail information.
Topic sentence
Supporting sentence.

Counter-evidence that
impacts the claims of both
previous body paragraphs
relating to landmarks and
animals
Australia’s isolation may not negatively impact tourist numbers as much as first considered.

It is a destination of choice with remoteness as a positive reason to travel to Australia where visitors experience a multitude of unique geographic features in one visit. Added to the attraction are the unique flora and fauna in their natural settings and in wildlife parks.

Though Australia may get fewer visitors in total in a global financial crisis, each visitor invests more in and during their stay than in most other countries.
It is evident on a range of measures that Australia’s unique plants and animals, as well as its geography, strongly influence tourist interest in visiting Australia.
3.0 Conclusion
Restatement of the topic
Summary of the
findings in the report
Thesis restated and evaluation
The appendices contains extra information that is put at the end of the report. They contain detailed information, such as diagrams, tables, graphs and questionnaires. Appendices should be clearly set out and numbered in the order they are mentioned in the text.
Table of Figures
Figure 1. Short-term International visitor arrivals p.9
background
outline
evidence and more detail
examples and evidence
Full transcript