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New Trash/Recycling Bin

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Olivia Ramirez

on 16 December 2013

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Transcript of New Trash/Recycling Bin

Abstract
Purpose is to design a new and easy to use trash/recycling bin
Help increase recycling in high school cafeterias
Research shows that not a lot of students know what to recycle
Bin will have 2 compartments, trash and recycling
It will be tested in Paradise Valley's High School cafeteria
Introduction

“We produce 15,000 tons of rubbish everyday”(Faculty of Electronic and Computer Engineering(2008) University Tekaikal Malaysia Melaka.)
“On a poll out of 63, 22 people said they actually recycle but there is still plastic bottles found in the garbage can”(Recycling in Schools. Retrieved September 4, 2013).

Problem Statement
Problem Statement: In high school cafeterias, students are not sure what should be recycled and what should not. During lunch periods, recyclable and solid waste are placed with trash and not sorted out. According to Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, 65% of school waste could be recycled and only 28% was being recycled.

Prototype Design
New Trash/Recycling Bin
Emily Malone, Meghan Marlowe, Olivia Ramirez, Kaci Stalcup
Test Protocol
Protocol #1
Data Analysis
Conclusion
Summary
Design Statement: Design, build, and test a trash bin that can be used in schools, to help promote recycling, and to make it easier to recycle for students who do not understand how to.
Design statement
To pass the test:
If less than 25% of the items in the trash portion of the bin are materials that should have been recycled then the students paid attention to the labels.
Protocol #1
1. Two days before test is planned we will ask permission from the school to place our trash/recycling bin in the cafeteria
2. Once we have obtained permission, our team will place the bin in the cafeteria.
3. Test will start the same time first lunch starts.
4. In between the two lunches, the bin will be emptied and the contents from each bin will be kept separate for the first part of this test.
5. Before second lunch new trash bags will be placed in the bin.
6. After the second lunch the bill will be emptied and the contents from each bin will be kept separate for the second part of the test.
7. Our group will go through the trash bin ourselves and analyze the trash and recycle that was thrown away.
8. We will then compare what percentage of trash should have been recycled for each lunch.
9. If it is less than 25% for each lunch, then we know that the students followed the criteria on the bin.\
10. If one or both of the lunches are over 25% than we know we will focus on how we can encourage them to lower the percentage.
Test Protocol
Protocol #2
To pass the test:
Survey must have an 75% of people say that it was simple and easy to use.
1. In high school cafeterias, students are unsure what should be recycled and what should not. During lunch periods, recyclable and solid waste products are placed with trash and not sorted out.
2. According to Minnesota Pollution Agency, 65% of school waste could be recycled and of that only 28% is being recycled.
3. After researching this problem, the team decided the best approach would be to design, build, and test a new trash/recycling bin. We drafted a design for the bin and started to build. Throughout the building process we strengthened the materials and evaluated our design until it met all of the build criteria.
4. One of the goals for the project was to test our new bin on campus but we ran out of time due to delays on receiving the materials before construction could begin.
Protocol #2
1. Two days before test is planned we will ask permission from the school to place our trash/recycling bin in the cafeteria
2. Once we have obtained permission, our team will place the bin in the cafeteria.
3. Test will start the same time first lunch starts.
4. At the end of the second lunch, the bin will be emptied and taken to the CREST building for another test.
5. We will then send out a survey
6. We will give three days for students to email their responses.
7. At the end of the three days we will collect the data.
8. Using google survey we will collect the results.
9. Using the results we will make charts depicting the results for the survey.
10. If 75% of people said it was helpful then it passed the test.
What we thought about our project:
Throughout the research process we learned more about recycling and how big of a problem it really was.
We also got more ideas for our prototype and discovered ways people are trying to promote recycling in their community.
Going through the design process and trying to complete a design that would fit all of our criteria was, in my opinion, the part of our project that pushed us to the limit and made us try the hardest.
The whole group had to come up with solutions, in the form of our prototype, to solve the different problems our design might face when it was put into use.
The part of the project that was the most fun was building our prototype. It was cool to learn how to use the different tools and get to create the design we had worked so hard on.
Overall the project was very fun and we all learned a lot.
Test #1
count the number of pieces of trash in the trash side that was correctly put in there
count the number of items that should be recycled that were placed correctly in the recycling side of our bin
then count the number of items that should have been in the recycling side but weren't
If less than 25% of that trash in the trash side was recycle than that’s what we wanted, but if it is more than 25% than we need to figure out something that will make it go up.
Test #2
go through and count how many people respond from each lunch and what they voted
after filling out the chart above we will also make a chart to see if the grade of the person affects the response
if 75% said yes or somewhat then we know that it was simply and easy to use
help us to know how we need to target the presentation to, to get them to pay more attention and recycle
Why isn't there data?
We were unable to complete our tests due to delays in receiving our key materials. These delays caused us to also be unable to complete our prototype.
To be able to create the design in the experiment, research was needed to be done to understand the problem which needed to be solved. :
“Between 10 and 20 percent of Phoenix curbside recyclables end up in landfills” (John Dickerson (2008, April 8). Recycling 101: What to recycle, what not to recycle, and does it even matter?. Phoenix News Times. Retrieved September 4, 2013).

“An aluminum soda can, can take 200 to 500 years to decompose” (Recycling in Schools). There are millions of soda cans in one landfill. The more soda cans that are put into landfills is less space for other materials to be put in that cannot be recycled and with the amount of time it takes for soda cans to decompose the space won't be free for a while.
Resources
Faculty of Electronic and Computer Engineering(2008). University Tekaikal Malaysia Melaka. Retrieved September 4, 2013 from: http://library.utem.edu.my/index2.php?option=com_docman&task=doc_view&gid=5309&Itemid=208
Selene Aparicio (2011, May 17) How to Boost Recycling Rates in Schools. What were the biggest obstacles that you identified? The Daily Green. Retrieved September 8th 2013 from http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/recycling-in-schools
Waste Management. Residential recycling services. Retrieved September 4, 2013 from: https://www.wm.com/residential/recycling-services.jsp
Selene Aparicio (2011, May 17). How to Boost Recycling Rates in School. The Daily Green. Retrieved September 4, 2013, from http://www.thedailygreen.com/environmental-news/latest/recycling-in-schools
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