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Essay Structure

How to write a 'critically analyse' essay
by

Paul Jennings

on 21 January 2013

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Transcript of Essay Structure

'Critically Analyse' Essay Structure Critically examine a curriculum or aspect of a curriculum, identifying and justifying potential
changes, improvements and/or developments with reference to principles of curriculum design
and inclusiveness. Before you start Examining (Analysing) asks 'how' or 'why'

'Critically' simply means you say why this works/doesn't work

'Identifying and justifying potential changes' - compare new ideas to the old ones currently in place

Use the question as a checklist: if it asks you to include something - include it! Introduction - briefly introduce your topic with any relevant background information

Pros/Cons - Choose which option you have the least amount of points for Structure (1/2) Structure (2/2) Tips for a successful Analysis
Constantly compare throughout - It will give you your pros and cons and will justify your reasoning

The paragraph with the most amount of points goes last as your conclusion will lean towards agreeing with this paragraph

The reader will tend to agree more with your conclusion as your points backing it up are the last points they read

NEVER include new information in your conclusion Pros/Cons - Choose the option you have the most amount of points for (the opposite to the last paragraph)

Conclusion - Sum up your argument, going in favour for the paragraph you have just written

(You can have more than 2 pros/cons paragraphs if need be)
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