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starch based sauces

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on 20 April 2014

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Transcript of starch based sauces

Starch based sauces
2. COLD LIQUID

Water, milk or stock may be used to separate the starch granules.


A "slurry" of flour, cornflour or gravy powder and cold liquid is mixed, then poured into the hot liquid, while stirring.
3. SUGAR
Granulated sugar can be used as a separating agent for foods such as custard. The sugar crystals mixed (dry) with the custard powder prevent lumping.
Then liquid is added and the mixture stirred and heated
So what's the problem?
Starch based sauces are generally thickened with flour, cornflour or gravy powder.



These sauces must be bought to the boil to develop the best flavour and complete thickening.


A problem for starch thickened sauces is the undesirable "lumping" as the sauce heats and thickens.

Look at picture....familiar?

To avoid LUMPING, the sticky starch granules must be kept separate by one of the following 3 ways........
Trouble shoot...

if lumps have formed use an "immersion" (stick) blender or press through a sieve.
1. FAT (BUTTER, OIL, MARGARINE)

When mixed with flour, a film forms around each starch granule stopping them clumping together.

Butter is heated gently with flour for 1 min (called “roux”) and then the liquid, usually milk (for a white sauce) is stirred in gradually until the desired thickness is achieved
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