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CRAFTING MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS: DIGITAL STORYTELLING, REFLECTIVE BLOGS, AND THE EDUCATION TWITTER FEED IN THE TEACHER E

NCTE National Convention Presentation, Las Vegas, Nevada, November, 16th 2012
by

Thor Gibbins

on 27 June 2013

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Transcript of CRAFTING MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS: DIGITAL STORYTELLING, REFLECTIVE BLOGS, AND THE EDUCATION TWITTER FEED IN THE TEACHER E






Department of Teaching and Learning, Policy and Leadership

Thor Gibbins
tgibbins@umd.edu
@SonOfOdin0913

Jessica Demink-Carthew
jdc@umd.edu

Magaret Peterson
magpete@umd.edu
@magpete55

CRAFTING MEANINGFUL CONNECTIONS:

DIGITAL STORYTELLING, REFLECTIVE BLOGS,
AND THE EDUCATION TWITTER FEED
IN THE TEACHER EDUCATION CLASSROOM

Welcome!
Questions?
Thor Gibbins:
Our Storied Childhoods: Re-Visioning Our Literary Selves through Digital Storytelling
Jessica Demink-Carthew:
Blogging as a Tool for Teacher Reflection
Margaret Peterson:
Learning at the Hashtag: Twitter in the Connected Education Classroom
Thor Gibbins
tgibbins@umd.edu
@SonOfOdin0913
Our Storied Childhoods: Re-Visioning Our Literary Selves through Digital Storytelling
Reflective Blogging Assignment
Phase 1: Scaffolded reflection
Select a perplexing moment in your classroom.
Take perspectives.
Consider alternatives & possible consequences.
Connect with "big ideas" in teaching.
Phase 2: Unscaffolded reflection
Select a perplexing moment in your classroom.
Reflect on this moment using "habits of mind" that you believe to be the most relevant to the moment
Phase 3: Final meta-reflection
Review your blog posts and reflect on your major take-aways relating to the habits of mind that were most salient for you
What is a digital story?
A digital story is a short, personal, multi-media tale. Digital stories derive their power by weaving images, music, narrative and voice together, thereby giving deep dimension and vivid color to characters, situations, experiences, and insights.
~Leslie Rule, Center for Digital Storytelling
Assignment: 2-3 minute digital story about an important childhood experience with story: https://docs.google.com/document/d/13H-4-xQ1iRbFbhDcN0Og6E87ZrRrB3bkuLdK2QmXTwc/edit
Why?
Most producers of digital videos use digital media to recapture and tell meaningful experiences in their lives (Ito, et al, 2010)
For many elementary teachers, their own childhood literacy experiences shape the way they approach literature and literacy in their classrooms (Yeo, 2007)
Students' Thoughts:
"This project allowed me to reflect on how I discovered my childhood reading identity. A lot of people or my relatives perceived me as a smart kid since then. However, I think they did not know the part where I was just starting to build self-esteem and courage to be that smart kid that they have seen. Remembering those memories made me realize that I have been that kid who secretly always wanted to tell and read stories to people. I thought that I was just a shy little girl all along my childhood, and I never thought that my interest in storytelling has always been there."
"I really loved this assignment. I was able to reflect on an important part of my childhood and learned how my experiences with books could actually help me in my classroom."
"I truly enjoyed putting my digital story. It gave me a chance to work with iMovie and learn how to put videos together. I used a mixture of my own pictures with pictures I found of the book online. It was also nice to use my own voice to tell my story rather than just text and pictures. I think this is a great assignment because it gives students the opportunity to use technology in a way that they will be able to use in their classroom. In our highly tech world this skill will be very important. Also, in doing this assignment I was able to connect what I was learning in class with a personal experience. I had never actually thought about a childhood experience I had with a story. It gave me the opportunity to reflect on the literary experiences I’ve had. "
Learning at the Hashtag: Twitter in the Connected Education Classroom
Problem: How do we create and foster a "social learning system" in which students' knowledge of instructional practices and education policy are expanded? How do we introduce our students to the professional life of educators?
Social Learning System

"Whether we are apprentices or pioneers, newcomers or old timers, knowing always involves these two components: the competence that our communities have established over time (i.e. what it takes to act and be recognized as a competent member), and our ongoing experience of the world as a member (in the context of a given community and beyond)".

"Learning so defined is an interplay between social competence and personal experience. It is a dynamic, two-way relationship between people and the social learning systems in which they participate. It combines personal transformation with the evolution of social structures" (Wenger, 2000, p. 227).
The Assignment:
What Students Did:
The Final Project:
Designing a 21st Century Learning Experience:
Collaboration in our Google Doc.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1LMjr21hu5O6DI8NMDxkmz-xB6pOdCgyBMWc3Osk5FOs/edit
What Students Said:
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/gform?key=0AsQWYdiIIO3ddGNoSW91ZXdlb2x3M0ttbEdlZ28weEE&gridId=0#chart
"Classmates shared really interesting, informational, resources and links that I will definitely use in the future. Furthermore, classmates would talk about what we were learning in class, causing me to view things in a way I hadn't necessarily seen myself."

"Twitter made me think more deeply about the information we were talking about, and it made me think about different ways I could use the things we were learning about in my future classroom."

" I loved reading everyone's different views and the way they interpreted different information."

"I feel that it helped make a sense of community in the classroom because everyone could simply write their opinion of the material any time. I also enjoyed the resources provided by the education follows such as @WeAreTeachers and @edutopia. Because our class was so short, Twitter made it possible for us to use the time wisely to make connections between the things we learned and our own experiences."

Hi Prof. Peterson,

After looking for a specific tweet I started realizing that our #UMD397 hashtag has had surprising reach! A couple of highlights-

-Ending up in a Spanish-language Scoop.It: http://www.scoop.it/t/bibliotecas-escolares-curating-and-spreading-portuguese-school-libraries-action

-Trending hashtag in the Future of Information Alliance (FIA): http://www.fia.umd.edu/priorities/

-Trending hashtag in the Venn Librarian Daily (well-curated library Paper.Li): http://paper.li/VennLibrarian?edition_id=9ed28130-a9eb-11e1-96aa-0025907210e8
What Twitter Said:
References:
Cervetti, G., Damico, J., & Pearson, P. D. (2006). Multiple literacies, new literacies, and teacher education. Theory into Practice, 45(4), 378-386.

Ito, M., Baumer, S., Bittani, M., boyd, d., Cody, R., Herr-Stephenson, B., et al. (2010). Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.

Jay, J. & Johnson, K. (2002) Capturing complexity: A typology of reflective practice for teacher education, Teaching and Teacher Education, 18, pp 73-85.

Wenger, E. (2000). Communities of Practice and Social Learning Systems. SAGE Social Science Collections, 7(2) , 225-246.

Yeo, M. (2007). New literacies, alternative texts: Teachers' conceptualisations of composition and literacy. English Teaching: Practice and Critique, Vol. 6, No. 1 , 113-131.
The Problem
In an era of rapidly evolving technology, teacher educators are faced with the challenge of preparing preservice teachers to integrate new technologies and literacies in their classrooms.

The Challenge:
Cervetti, Damico, and Pearson (2006) suggest that “with respect to technology, future teachers should learn about, through, and with technology-based media” (p.383). How then do we meaningfully integrate technology with the objectives of an already saturated preservice teacher education program?
Reflective blogging in the Elementary Ed ELA Methods Course
Why blogging?
Increasingly popular genre of writing

that is well suited to reflection: encourages fluency, voice, and personal expression
Authentic purpose and audience
Opportunity to share learning beyond the traditional teacher-student hand off
Enables preservice teachers to learn about writing instruction while being engaged in writing
Phase 2
Habits of Mind
Example
Phase 1
Scaffolded reflection across 3 dimensions
Final Meta-reflection
Photo Story Tutorial (Good for young composers) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=06MFnTRqcKM
Movie Maker (A little more complicated than PhotoStory) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j9C-D30_P8Q
iMovie 11 (same level as Movie Maker but for Mac) www.youtube.com/watch?v=9p0AIPQWhuA
Audio mixing Audacity tutorial www.youtube.com/watch?v=lrPGMjZORCM
Download audacity for free http://audacity.sourceforge.net/download/
Digital Story Resources
Compose a 2-3 minute length digital story about one important childhood experience with a story. Experiences with story should include an experience with a story (reading, writing, listening, or telling) that shaped (positively or negatively) your attitudes toward reading in general. It is also possible that your story may include shared story experiences (reading, writing, listening, or telling experiences with family members, friends, teachers, etc.).
Focus: Consider your identity when you read this book and how that identity interacted with the text to create meaning.
Give your reader a sense of the actual experience you had around your story, specifically the who, what, when, where, why, and how of this experience as you remember it through your childhood eyes and body.
Writing For Digital Storytelling
Reflect on stories from you childhood:
Which stories, if any, were mirrors? Why
Which stories, if any, were windows? Why
Why is important for children to have stories that are both mirrors and windows?
Share with a friend, neighbor, or a "new" friend near you...
Stories Mirrors & Windows
“I also liked how I got to see how some of my classmates were dealing with accommodating ELL students since I don’t have any in my class. I read Dana’s blog about a girl who was struggling with her English. She had a great idea about strengthening the girl’s Spanish skills in order to be able to further strengthen her English skills and showing her how they parallel with one another. Reading her blog really showed me how it is important to use all types of language to help bridge gaps for ELL students.”
Themes from student experiences
(based on interviews)
Blogging extends learning by providing windows into the experiences of others
Blogging facilitates meta-reflection by creating a time capsule of thinking and learning.
Reflective blogging
in the
teacher education classroom
Jessica DeMink-Carthewjdc@umd.edu
Next Steps
Finding ways to move from viewership to collaborative reflection
Investigating and encouraging transfer to internship settings
www.kidblog.org
“I’m not alone.”

“I never would have thought of that.”

“I have come to realize that even though we are in the same county, our classrooms are completely different worlds. Just going from school to school, there are so many differences ethnically, structurally, and even procedures are different.“

“I also liked how I got to see how some of my classmates were dealing with accommodating ELL students since I don’t have any in my class. I read Dana’s blog about a girl who was struggling with her English. She had a great idea about strengthening the girl’s Spanish skills in order to be able to further strengthen her English skills and showing her how they parallel with one another. Reading her blog really showed me how it is important to use all types of language to help bridge gaps for ELL students.”
“I don’t know if you know but after I get most of my papers back, if I see the grade, I just throw it away. You can’t throw this away.”

“I used to think it was embarrassing reading stuff that you wrote about before but it’s not, it’s actually really helpful. . .it gives me more confidence because I can see I have changed as a teacher. I am doing more-- Okay, instead of just being like, “Okay, back to your desks.”, I’m saying“Why don’t you take 30 seconds to share with a knee partner?” every time now. And in the beginning here I definitely did not. There's growth there.”
Adapted from Jay & Johnson, 2002
Full transcript