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Vowels Sounds

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by

Josue Cea

on 6 December 2013

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Transcript of Vowels Sounds

Vowels Sounds
Short Vowels
/ I /
high-mid front unrounded
A long vowel sound is a sound which is the same as, or very similar to the letter name of one of the vowels.A short vowel is a letter in the English language that is often times expressed through a free passage of breath through the larynx and the mouth.mid-low front unroundedæmid-low central unrounded, full/stressedmid-low central unrounded, full/stressedɒɒ
Spelling cases:
y
gym
/dʒIm/


ui
build


/bIld/

i
lip
/lIp/
/ e /
mid-low front unrounded
Spelling cases:
e
pet
/pet/

ea
bread
/bred/

ie
friend
/frend/
/ æ /
low front unrounded
Spelling cases:
Pronouncing:
lips:
are relaxed and slightly parted
Jaw:
is slightly lower than for /i/
Tongue:
is high, but lower than for /i/
Pronouncing:
Lips: are slightly spread and unround
Jaw: is open more than for /ei/
Tongue: is midlevel in the mouth
Pronouncing:
lips: are spread
Jaw: is open wider than for /e/
Tongue: is low near the floor of the mouth
a
at the beginning at the middle
actor
map
/ ʌ /
mid-low central unrounded,

full/stressed
Pronouncing:
lips:
are relaxed and slightly parted
Jaw:
is relaxed ans slightly lowered
Tongue:
is relaxed and midlevel in the mouth
u
bus
/bʌs/
oo
flood

/flʌd/
ou
young

/jʌŋ/
o
son

/sʌn/
oe
does

/dʌz/
/
Pronouncing:
lips:
are completely apart in a "yawing" position

jaw:
is lower than for any other vowel
Tongue:
is flat on the floor of the mouth
Spelling cases
a
at the beginning at the middle
option
lock
o
fox
Open back rounded
/ ʊ /
mid-high back rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are relaxed and slightly parted.
Jaw:
is slightly lower than /u/
Tongue:
is high, bout lower than /u/
Spelling cases
u
push
/pʊʃ/
oo
wood
/wʊd/
ou
should
/ʃʊd/
A less frequent spelling pattern for /ʊ/
is letter "o"
/ ə /
mid central rhotacized,
unstressed/reduced
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are producted and slightly parterd
Jaw:
is slightly lowered
Tongue:
the tongue muscles are complety realxed
Spelling cases:
Many different spellings. /ə/ is always unstressed
ar



er

or

ure

sugar paper color picture
The vowel /ə/ does not occur at the beginning of the words in english
Long Vowels
A long vowel sound is a sound which is the same as, or very similar to the letter name of one of the vowels.
/ i :/
high front unrounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:


are tense and in a "smile" position
Jaw:
is completely raised
Tongue:
is high near the roof of the mouth
e ee ea ie
or
ei
we heel peach piece
The sound /i:/ in English is similar to stressed "i" in spanish.
/i:/ is actually longer and more prolonged that spanish "i"
/ a:/
low back unrounded
Pronouncing:
ɜːLips:
are completely apart in "yawing position"
Jaw:
is lower than for any other vowel.
Tongue:
is flat on the floor of the mouth
Spelling cases:
at the beginnig at the middle
a
arm cap
o
spot
/ ɔ: /
mid-low back rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are in a tense oval shape and slightly protruded
Jaw:
is open more than for /ou/
Tongue:
is low near at the floor of the mouth
Spelling cases
o al aw au or
dog stall jaw auto door
ar
garden
/ u: /
high back rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are tense and in a "whistling" position
Jaw:
is completely raised
Tongue:

is high near the roof of the mouth.
Spelling cases:
u*
rule

/ru:l/

oo
school

/sku:l/

o
who
/hu:/
ui
fruit

/fru:t/

oe
shoe

/ʃu/

we
new
/nu:/
ue




blue
/blu:/
* specially before consonant + e
/ 3: /
mid central rhotacized, stressed
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are prodruded and slightly parted
Jaw:
is slightly lowered
Tongue:
is midlevel in the mouth
Spelling cases:
ir er ur ear or
bird
servant
purple
learn
world
/ 3: / is a sound that occurs only in stressed syllables of words
Vowels Chart
short and long vowels
Diphthongs
triphthongs
A diphthong, also known as a gliding vowel, refers to two adjacent vowel sounds occurring within the same syllable. Technically, a diphthong is a vowel with two different targets: that is, the tongue moves during the pronunciation of the vowel. For most dialects of English, the sentence "no highway cowboys" contains five distinct diphthongs.
/ eI /
mid-high front unrounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are spread and unround
Jaw:


rises with the tongue and closes slighlty
Tongue:
glides from midlevel to near the roof of the mouth
Spelling cases:
a ai ay eight
lady
grain
play
weight
Less frequent spelling patterns for /ei/ consist of the letters "ea" , "ey", and "ei"
Examples: br
ea
k gr
ea
t th
ey
gr
ey
v
ei
n
/ aI /
low central unrounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:

glide from an open to s slightly parted position
Jaw:


rises with the tongue and closes
Tongue:

glides from low to high near the roof of the mouth
Spelling cases:
i* y ie igh uy
ice
why
pie
night
buy
* especially before consonant + e
/ɔI /
mid back rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:

glide for a tense oval shape to a relaxed, slightly parted position.
Jaw:

rises with the tongue and closes.
Tongue:

glides from a low position to high near the roof of the mouth
Spelling cases:
oi oy
at the beginning in the middle at the end
oil
boil
boy
/æk.tər/
/mæp/
/ʃʊg.ər/

/pe.pər/
/kʌl.ər/

/pk.tʃər/
/wi:/ /hi:l/

/pi:tʃ/
/pi:s/
/a:rm/
/ka:p/
/spa:t/
/gɑ.dən/
/stɔ:l/

/dɔ:g/
/dʒɔ:/
/ɔ:təʊ/

/dɔ:r/
/b3:d/
/s3:vənt/
/p3:pl/
/l3:n/
/w3:ld/
/leI.di/
/greIn/
/pleI/
/weIt/
/aIs/
/waI/
/paI/
/naIt/
/baI/
/ɔIl/
/bɔIl/
/bɔI/
/əʊ/
/oʊ/ :US
mid-high back rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:

are tense very round
Jaw:

rises with the tongue and closes slightly
Tongue:

glides from midlevel to near the roof of the mouth
Spelling cases:
o* oa ow oe ou
home
toast
slow
toe
shoulder
/ʃəʊl.dər/
/həʊm/
/təʊst/

/sləʊ/
/təʊ/
/aʊ/
low central rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:

glide from an open position

Jaw:

rises with the tongue and closes
Tongue:

glides from low to high near the roof of the mouth
Spelling cases:
ou ow
house
cow
/haʊs/
/kaʊ/
low central unrounded
/Iə/
Pronouncing:
Lips:

are tense and in a "smile" position

Jaw:

is completely raised
Tongue:

is high near the roof of the mouth
Spelling cases:
eer ere ear ea
beer
here
year
idea

/aI'dIə/
/bIə/
/hIə/
/jIə/
/eə/
mid-low front unrounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:
are slightly spread and unround
Jaw:
is open more than for /ei/
Tongue:
is midlevel in the mouth
Spelling cases
air are eir ere ear
chair

/tʃeər/
square
/skweər/
their
/ðeər/
there
/ðeər/
wear
/weər/
/ʊə/
central mid rounded
Pronouncing:
Lips:

are relaxed and slightly parted.
Jaw:
i
s slightly lower than /u/ with /e/
Tongue:
is
high, bout lower than /u/ with /e/
Spelling cases:
A very unusual sound
ou eu u
tourist
/'tʊə.rst/
Europe
/'jʊə.rəp/
/'plʊə.rəl/
plural
In phonetics, a triphthong /trfŋ/ (from Greek , "triphthongos", literally "with three sounds," or "with three tones") is a monosyllabic vowel combination involving a quick but smooth movement of the articulator from one vowel quality to another that passes over a third. While "pure" vowels, or monophthongs, are said to have one target articulator position, diphthongs have two, and triphthongs three.
In RP and many varieties of British
English the final r of all triphthongs
is not pronounced, but in GA and most American Varieties ofEnglish, the final r is typically pronounced with an r-coloured vowel.
They are 5 triphthongs
/eIə/
/aIə/
/ɔIə/
/əʊə/
/aʊə/
SPELLING CASES
/eIə/
ayer
Words:
layer player payer
/'peI.ər/
/'pleI.ər/

/'leI.ər/
SPELLING CASES
/aIə/
ire iro iar yer
Words:
fire
Iron
Liar
Hire
/faIər/
/aIən/
/'laI.ər/
/haIər/
SPELLING CASES
/ɔIə/
Words
oya oyer
Royal
/'rɔI.əl/
Employer
/Im'plɔI.ər/
SPELLING CASES
/əʊə/
Words:
ower
Lower Mower
/'ləʊ.ər/
/'məʊ.ər/
SPELLING CASES

/aʊə/
Words:
awe our
Power
/paʊər/
hour
/aʊər/
MINIMAL PAIRS
Exercies..... have fun :)
"if you can dream it, you can make it", you only have to trust in God

"If ju: kæn dri:m It, ju: kæn maIk It"
ju: əʊn.li hæv tə trʌst In Gɑ:d

Thank you
Practice the vowels, this can help you
to improve your pronunciation

JC
/
Full transcript