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Onomatopoeia & Alliteration

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by

Jenna Hall

on 12 September 2013

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Transcript of Onomatopoeia & Alliteration

They go...
Definition: When a word imitates a sound to create a sound effect, this is onomatopoeia.
ONOMATOPOEIA
SNAP, CRACKLE AND POP
The breakfast tray
crashed
and
clattered
to the floor.
The children
splashed
and
sloshed
in the swimming pool.
The dog
whined
and the cat
purred
.
Work with a partner and write down as many sound words as you can think of.
THINK OF WHAT THINGS MAKES THOSE NOISES
the boom of the thunder
the crash of the waves
I HEAR ...
I HEAR ...
Sid the snake, slithered slowly through the grass.
Here the ‘s’ sound suggests the sound of the snake, quiet and slimy.
Alliteration is when several words close to each other begin with the same letter, creating a sound effect, and rhythm.
Tongue twisters make good use of alliteration

She sells sea shells on the sea shore.

Peter Piper picked a peck of picked peppers.

A tutor who tooted the flute
Tried to tutor two tooters to toot.
Said the two to the tutor
‘Is it harder to toot, or
To tutor two tooters to toot?’
How many words beginning with ‘R’ can you think of to describe this picture?
Our learning intentions are to:
develop our understanding of poetic techniques.
explore onomatopoeia and alliteration.

We will be successful if we can:
explain what onomatopoeia and alliteration are.
show our understanding of these techniques by using them in our writing.
POETIC TECHNIQUES
Writing our own
Full transcript