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Communication Model

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by

LM Coppoletta

on 17 August 2014

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Transcript of Communication Model

NOISE
Physical Noise (EXTERNAL)
Physical noise is external to the speaker and listener.

Psychological Noise (INTERNAL)
Psychological noise is mental interference that prevents you from listening.

Physiological Noise (INTERNAL)
Physiological noise is any physiological issue that interferes with communication.
EX: Migraine

Semantic Noise (INTERNAL)
Semantic noise occurs when there is no shared meaning between source and receiver.
Ex: medical professionals who use terminology that many people may not understand. 
(one listener's semantic noise may be perceived as highly credible by another listener)
(utilize definitions and vivid examples to decrease semantic noise)
Noise is anything that interferes with a message being transmitted from a sender to a receiver.


It results from both internal and external factors.
COMMUNICATION
MODEL
SOURCE/SENDER/SPEAKER
RECEIVER/LISTENER
MESSAGE
CHANNEL
NOISE
ENCODING
DECODING
CONTEXT
FEEDBACK
Intrapersonal
Interpersonal
Group/Team-Building
Public Speaking
Mass Communication
Social Media
Dimensions
of Speech Discipline
Physical Context – restaurant, office, funeral, party

Social Context – past relationships

Chronological Context – when episode occurring

Cultural Context – organizational and ethnic considerations
CONTEXT
Full transcript