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Samuel Taylor Coleridge

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Gaby Lopez

on 1 February 2013

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Transcript of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Finally Kubla Khan Life, Family, & Death Odd Life -Initially went to a doctor for chronic chest pain from childhood
-Prescribed laudanum; effective and addictive
-Symptoms: weep, sweat, scream
-Ashamed; seen as weak; verge of suicide
-Overly-medicated 3-hour nap: dreamed an epic poem of Mongol emperor Kubla Khan
-Awoke and wrote 54 lines before he was interrupted; couldn't remember any of it
--"The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" Lyrical Ballads Published 1798
Marked the Beginning of the Romantic Movement
Wanted to change how poetry was written and read
Written in Vernacular Language **Key to success? OPIUM Started reading school at age 3
Ran away at 7 because brother Frank ruined cheese snack, fight, Coleridge grabs knife about to stab, mother interrupts and Coleridge runs away and hides for the night, found the next day, serious illness ~Lost father at 9
~Attended Cambridge University, but left before graduating and enlisted
~Robert Southey: both planned democratic utopian community in Pennsylvania call Pantisocracy
-Pantisocracy would be their escape from the current political system ~Lectured and wrote to raise money and awareness
~Southey abandoned plan, and it crumbled "What is Life" Everything that we choose to think about or do in life is always changing because we change.
Life used to be full of light, and all the colors of nature become mixed into one, so we don't always see the beauty in nature, because our mind focuses on living and dieing.
Our minds run free; life is free so it is up to us to live life without worrying about death. At this time using capital letters within poems were becoming more excepted, hence the random capitals in this poem. Life, Self, and Death are capitalized to emphasize his theme of this poem. Basic theme is of human experience relating to nature; not about what is out there in reality, but rather experience itself. Contributions Famous Works Lyrical Ballads is considered the first great collection of Romantic poetry.
Contained his most famous poem, "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner." In 1817, he published Biographia Literaria, which contained some of his finest work. Inspiration and
Influences Epic poem about a "pleasure-dome" built in Xanadu
-Alph River=sacred, caverns, sunless sea, "gardens bright with sinuous rills"
"a mighty fountain momently was forced:....burst huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail"
-Kubla Khan hears ancestors prophesying about war
-Abyssinian maid singing of Mount Abora
"Could i revive within me/ Her symphony and song" Lesson Coleridge hopes to illustrate the importance of imagination and creativity
-Ex: speaks more on the land in Xanadu than the Mongol emperor himself

Love and respect for nature
-Ex: imagery, talks on what he sees visually; never touches anything Soon after the publication of Lyrical Ballads, he fell in love with Sara Hutchinson.
Because he was already married, he channeled his love for her into his poetry where he referred to her as "Asra." Why his writing is different Many of his inspirations later in life came from his opium addiction.

Kubla Khan came to him while he was in a heavily medicated sleep. -His creativity and unique imagination allows the reader to be submerged in the imagery and emotion without overdoing it and becoming boring

-Never borrowed other writers concepts to expand his own ideas

-Lot of his work is unfinished, but those pieces are some of his best works

-Still able to produce such high-quality works even while fighting a crippling addiction Born on October 21, 1772 in Ottery St. Mary, Devonshire, England
Son of Reverend John and Ann Bowden Coleridge
He was the youngest of 10 children
He married Sara Fricker in October 1795
They had 4 children, Hartley (1796), Berkeley (1797), Derwent (1800), and Sara (1802)
His son Berkeley died at age two in February 1799
His marriage was over after their daughter Sara was born, they never divorced but they seperated
Died of a massive heart attack compounded by rheumatic hypertension on July 25, 1834
Buried in Highgate cemetery in London "The Pains of Sleep" 3 days of opium withdrawal
Day 1: went fine, it was quiet and calm and he didn't have problems without it
Day 2: was a struggle, it was torturous, he spent the night in agony and felt a tremendous guilt
Day 3: he spoke of his horrible nightmares and how they were due to his sins, but thateven though he sees how bad they are he still wants to do them, that those griefs don't apply to him, that he is who he is and all he wants is love and to love http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=215
http://www.shmoop.com/coleridge/resume.html
http://www.biography.com/people/samuel-taylor-coleridge-9253238
http://www.shmoop.com/coleridge/opium-addiction.html
http://www.shmoop.com/coleridge/biography.html
http://www.poeticterminology.net/dark-poetry/18-kubla-khan.htm
http://poetry.about.com/od/19thcpoets/p/coleridge.htm
http://www.notablebiographies.com/Co-Da/Coleridge-Samuel-Taylor.html
http://www.poeticterminology.net/romantic-poetry/27-the-presence-of-love-by-samuel-taylor-coleridge.htm
http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/coleridge/themes.html
http://www.sparknotes.com/poetry/coleridge/analysis.html
http://web.ebscohost.com/Irc/detail?vid=3&sid=ac60a78d-7442-4cl0-af5e-d68bae3fl7e6%40sessionmgr111&hid=125&bdata=JnNpdGU9bHJjLWxpdmU%3d#db=lfh&AN=103331MSW10819850000080 Sources
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