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A Myth of Devotion by Lousie Gluck

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Ayani Burlas

on 25 September 2012

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Transcript of A Myth of Devotion by Lousie Gluck

photo (cc) Malte Sörensen @ flickr by Louise Gluck A Myth of Devotion Ayani Burlas
Alexis Pullins
Evadne Williams Free Verse
No rhyme scheme Type of Poem When Hades decided he loved this girl
he built for her a duplicate of earth,
everything the same, down to the meadow,
but with a bed added.

Everything the same, including sunlight,
because it would be hard on a young girl
to go so quickly from bright light to utter darkness

Gradually, he thought, he'd introduce the night,
first as the shadows of fluttering leaves.
Then moon, then stars. Then no moon, no stars.
Let Persephone get used to it slowly.
In the end, he thought, she'd find it comforting.

A replica of earth
except there was love here.
Doesn't everyone want love?

He waited many years,
building a world, watching
Persephone in the meadow.
Persephone, a smeller, a taster.
If you have one appetite, he thought,
you have them all.

Doesn't everyone want to feel in the night
the beloved body, compass, polestar,
to hear the quiet breathing that says
I am alive, that means also
you are alive, because you hear me,
you are here with me. And when one turns,
the other turns—

That's what he felt, the lord of darkness,
looking at the world he had
constructed for Persephone. It never crossed his mind
that there'd be no more smelling here,
certainly no more eating.

Guilt? Terror? The fear of love?
These things he couldn't imagine;
no lover ever imagines them.

He dreams, he wonders what to call this place.
First he thinks: The New Hell. Then: The Garden.
In the end, he decides to name it
Persephone's Girlhood.
A soft light rising above the level meadow,
behind the bed. He takes her in his arms.
He wants to say I love you, nothing can hurt you

but he thinks
this is a lie, so he says in the end
you're dead, nothing can hurt you
which seems to him
a more promising beginning, more true. A Myth of Devotion by: Louise Gluck Persephone's Myth A "sugar coated" version
Hades' side of the story Foreshadowing
"In the end, he thought, she'd find it comforting." (Line 12) Lots of time passing by
Serial commas and asyndetons When Hades decided he loved this girl
he built for her a duplicate of earth,
everything the same, down to the meadow,
but with a bed added.

Everything the same, including sunlight,
because it would be hard on a young girl
to go so quickly from bright light to utter darkness

Gradually, he thought, he'd introduce the night,
first as the shadows of fluttering leaves.
Then moon, then stars. Then no moon, no stars.
Let Persephone get used to it slowly.
In the end, he thought, she'd find it comforting.

A replica of earth
except there was love here.
Doesn't everyone want love? Has a pretentious mind complex about women He waited many years,
building a world, watching
Persephone in the meadow.
Persephone, a smeller, a taster.
If you have one appetite, he thought,
you have them all.

Doesn't everyone want to feel in the night
the beloved body, compass, polestar,
to hear the quiet breathing that says
I am alive, that means also
you are alive, because you hear me,
you are here with me. And when one turns,
the other turns—

That's what he felt, the lord of darkness,
looking at the world he had
constructed for Persephone. It never crossed his mind
that there'd be no more smelling here,
certainly no more eating. Guilt? Terror? The fear of love?
These things he couldn't imagine;
no lover ever imagines them.

He dreams, he wonders what to call this place.
First he thinks: The New Hell. Then: The Garden.
In the end, he decides to name it
Persephone's Girlhood.
A soft light rising above the level meadow,
behind the bed. He takes her in his arms.
He wants to say I love you, nothing can hurt you

but he thinks
this is a lie, so he says in the end
you're dead, nothing can hurt you
which seems to him
a more promising beginning, more true. A "duplication of Earth",
the underworld Setting Line 2: When Hades decided he loved this girl he built for her a "duplicate of earth",
everything the same, down to the meadow,
but with a bed added. Not giving her a choice of who to love or where to live Hades finds Earth as a bad place, not as good as the Underworld Uses repetition
he tried really hard to please her strong, visual imagery of this replica of Earth Rhetorical question, sign of doubt that she will love him Stream of consciousness (stanza 6) Second set of repetition
to emphasize description shift He realized she would not accept it More rhetorical questions, doubting if he is morally right Hades steals her innocence and childhood The lie: I love you (so) nothing can hurt you
His love will hurt her Hades decided he did not care whether she loved him or not Tone Passionate, yet cynical Title
"A Myth of Devotion" "He waited many years, building a world, watching Persephone in a meadow." (Lines 16-17) He "devoted" a lot of thought and time into this, despite what other myths have said Theme Love is the worth of all destinations, no matter the path you take. Evidence of the Setting Line 7: "...bright light to utter darkness." Shows Juxtaposition to show extreme contrast between Persephone and Hades. Line 24: "..quiet breathing"
Shows synesthesia to further describe the moment of Hades' hunger for love. Speaker Someone speaking on the behalf of Hades. Evidence of Theme Evidence of Tone Line 42-46: "He wants to say I love you, nothing can hurt you/ but he thinks/ this is a lie, so he says in the end/ you're dead, nothing can hurt you," subject This is the socially immoral way. foreshadowing
doubt, possibility she would not like it parallelism
lose sight of who is the speaker metaphor
need a man to guide her Irony
a dark poem, but uses a lot of references to light. K, byeee
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