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Understanding Earth and Space Systems: SPACE

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by

Dan Melaragno

on 17 April 2014

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Transcript of Understanding Earth and Space Systems: SPACE

Sub-task 1
Sub-task 2
Sub-task 3
UNIT - Understanding Earth and Space Systems: SPACE
Sub-task 4
Students will create and build a sundial. Once completed, they will test their sundial outdoors at a few points throughout the day. They will use their sundials to determine the time of day and gain a better understanding of the Earth-Sun relationship. A class discussion will follow to uncover the findings.

Resources:
cardboard, sundial template, glue, scissors

Time:
1 hour a day over three days

Expectations:
Science
2.2 use technological problem-solving skills to design, build, and test devices
(e.g., a sundial, a model of the earth’s rotation around the sun) for investigating the motions of different bodies in the solar system
2.1 follow established safety procedures for handling tools and materials and observing the sun
Language
2.2 demonstrate an increasingly sophisticated understanding of appropriate speaking behavior in a variety of situations, including paired sharing, dialogue, and small-and-large-group discussions
Sub-task 5
Sub-task 6
Culminating Performance Task
Students will be told they have been chosen by NASA to lead a team of astronauts and engineers to select a planet to build a mine on. In groups of 2 or 3, students must defend their choice to NASA through research of their chosen planet. They must collect planetary information such as: distance to the sun, distance to the earth, surface temperature, gravity, diameter, mass, density, volume, surface composition, atmospheric composition and terrain. Once they have compiled the planets information they must do a write-up to justify why their selected planet is the best choice to mine on, and consider all the potential problems that astronauts could experience when living on the planet. They will then do a short presentation of their findings to the class who will act as NASA. They must convince the class that their planet is the best choice. They will conduct a survey before and after their presentation to determine how much of the class agrees that their planet is a good choice, disagrees, or needs more information. After their presentation they will graph the results of their survey and write a short reflection based on their results.
Rubric
Grade: 6

Season: Spring

By: Dan Melaragno
Deidre Medeiros
Justine Chanthanong
In small groups students will choose a famous Canadian astronaut to conduct further research on. They will be expected to create a profile of their astronaut, including a picture and post it on the class wiki/blog.

Resources:
Computers, class wiki/blog

Time:
2-3 hours over two days

Expectations:
Science
1.1 assess the contributions of Canadians to the exploration and scientific understandings of space
2.5 use a variety of forms to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes
Language
1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing, using a variety of strategies and a range of print and electronic resources
3.8 produce pieces of published work to meet identified criteria based on the expectations

Students research to make sure what they need in space. They create packed bags for themselves including 5 "Daily Activity" items in each bag that they would take with them to space. A written description will be included for each item explaining why they would bring that item and how they are going to use it.
Resources: Paper, Pencils, Computers, Research Books
Time: One hour per day, over three days of school.

Expectations
Science
2.3 use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate scientific and technological advances that allow humans to adapt to life in space
3.3 explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space
Language
1.3 gather information to support ideas for writing, using a variety of strategies and a range of print and electronic resources
3.8 produce pieces of published work to meet identified criteria based on the expectations
Students imagine that they are a Canadian astronaut. Over a five day period, they compose a daily journal entry as if they were on a space shuttle mission. They will write/illustrate presenting their personal observations while living and working in space.

Resources: Paper (lined and blank), Pencils, Pencil crayons, Markers

Time: One hour per day, over a week.

Expectations
Science
1.2 evaluate the social and environmental costs and benefits of space exploration, taking different points of view into account
3.3 explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space
3.4 identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration
Language
2.2 establish a distinctive voice in their writing appropriate to the subject and audience
2.3 use some vivid and/or figurative language and innovative expressions to enhance interest
Culminating Performance Task
Time:
5 hours

Resources:
computers, paper, pencils, pens

Expectations:
Science
2.3 use scientific inquiry/research skills to investigate scientific and technological advances that allow humans to adapt to life in space
2.5 use a variety of forms to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes
3.1 identify components of the solar system, including the sun, earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and meteoroids, and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms
3.3 explain how humans meet their basic biological needs in space (e.g., obtaining air, water, and food and managing bodily functions)
3.4 identify the technological tools and devices needed for space exploration (e.g., telescopes, spectroscope)
Math
-collect data by conducting a survey or an experiment to do with themselves, their environment, issues in their school or community, or content from another subject, and record observations or measurements
-collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data and display the data in charts, tables and graphs that have appropriate titles, labels, and scales that suit the range and distribution of the data, using a variety of tools
-read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data presented in charts, tables and graphs


Students will build a model of the solar system using appropriate materials. Students will also write a detailed description of the physical characteristics in qualitative terms.

Resources:
Styrofoam balls (variety of sizes), Students are encouraged to use any materials they see fit (i.e. wire clothing hanger, construction paper, paint, etc.)


Time:
3 hours a week over two weeks (10 days)

Expectations:
Science and Technology
2.4 use appropriate science and technology vocabulary, including axis, tilt, rotation, revolution, planets, moons, comets, and asteroids, in oral and written communication
3.1 identify components of the solar system, including the sun, the earth, and other planets, natural satellites, comets, asteroids, and meteoroids, and describe their physical characteristics in qualitative terms
3.2 identify the bodies in space that emit light (e.g., stars) and those that reflect light (e.g., moons and planets)
Language
3.3 confirm spellings and word meanings or word choice using a variety of resources appropriate for the purpose
3.4 use punctuation appropriately to communicate their intended meaning in longer and more complex sentences, with a focus on the use of: commas to separate words in a list or after an introductory word or phrase; quotation marks in dialogue; and some uses of the colon, semi-colon, and brackets

Students are to construct 8 different phases of the moon using Oreo cookies

Resources:
Paper plate/Napkins, 2 boxes of Oreo cookies

Time:
1 hour

Expectations:
Science
3.5 describe the effects of the relative positions and motions of the earth, moon, and sun
Full transcript