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Welcome to Galicia

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Katie Horvath

on 2 December 2013

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Transcript of Welcome to Galicia

Galicia



Benvido to Galicia
The Way of St. James
Food
Music
Travel Tools
Common Ingredient Translations

Seafood
Octopus (pulpo / polbo)
Gooseneck Barnacles (percebes / percebes)
Scallops (vieiras / veiras)
Mussels (mejillones / mexillóns)
Lampreys (lamprea / lamprea)

Meats
Pork (cerdo / porco)
Ham (jamón / xamón)
Beef (carne / carne)
Chicken (pollo / pito)

English (Spanish/Gallego)
Vegetables

Potato (patata / pataca)
In Galicia, cooked potatoes are also called cachelos
Cabbage (repollo / repolo)
Turnip (nabo / nabo)
Broccoli rabe (rapini / grelos)

Other
Bread (pan / pan)
Cheese (queso / queixo)
Dessert (postre / sobremesa)
Wine (Vino / Viño)
Distilled liquor (Aguardente)

Top 5 Dishes to Try
Five traditional dishes that every visitor should experience.
1. Pulpo Gallego (o á feira)
-Octopus steamed or grilled and served with a drizzle of olive oil and Spanish paprika. Served alone as a tapa or alongside white potatoes.

2. Lacón con grelos
-Chunks of a traditional dried ham (lacón) served with potatoes and broccoli rabe (grelos). This dish is eaten the most in the Spring, around Carnaval, when broccoli rabe is in season but can be found at other times of the year.

3. Empanadas
-Each region in Galicia has its own, distinct dough recipe and fillings but the most common fillings are tuna or bacalao (a type of white fish found throughout Spain). They can also be found filled with various meats, chorizo, or clams and are served either in small pieces as a tapa or larger as a main dish.

4. Pimientos de Padrón
-“Uns pican e outros non” (some are spicy, some are not) is the mantra that accompanies this popular pepper, found in the town of Herbón in the province of La Coruña. They re eaten grilled and sprinkled with salt. Beware: some really are spicy! You never know what you are going to get.

5. Caldo (or Cocido) Gallego
-Galicia’s most iconic dish apart from octopus, this stew is a pot meal that rural families historically made to use up whatever they had lying around. Although there are numerous variations, it typically includes a variety of meats (mostly pork but also chorizo, sausage, beef hocks and chicken), garbanzos and a variety of vegetables, especially potatoes and cabbage.

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Drinks and Desserts
Drinks
Galicia is best known for its fruity white wines and medium aged red wines. It’s two most well-known wines are:

Ribeiro:
wine from this region can be white or red. These wines, which can now be found in almost any kitchen, were once reserved for nobles both in Spain and abroad.

Albariño
: a white wine that pairs well with seafood.

Galicia is also known for its distlled alcohol,
namely
aguardente.

Literally translated as “fiery water”, this is a strong alcoholic drink that is made from fermenting what is left of the grapes that are pressed for wine. It comes in a variety of flavors, depending on the region, and is around 50% alcohol. Flavors include:
De bagazo
(clear, the original)
De herbas
(yellowish, fermented with herbs)
Licor café
(black, mixed with coffee and
sugar)
Crema de Augardente
(mixed with coffee, cream, and spices, like Irish cream liqueur)


Desserts

Galicia has a few known well desserts. Generally, Gallegos enjoy various honey, almond, and chestnut flavored cakes or cheese with wine after a meal.

Tarta de Santiago
An almond cake made of equal parts pulverized almonds, eggs and sugar and a little butter. It is then baked and covered with powdered sugar in a cross design in honor of Cross of Santiago.

Bica
Bica is a spongy cake that is particularly popular in the Orense region. It has a light cinnamon flavor and is typically eaten either at breakfast or during the daily “coffee hour”. It’s light texture makes it a good pair for heavier cheeses, licor café, and warm wine.

Queso de Tetilla
This is Galicia’s most famous cheese. It is a creamy cow’s milk cheese that must be aged at least 7 days and is sold in an iconic cone shape. It can be eaten alone, with some bread, or paired with white wine.

Queimada
Queimada is an alcoholic drink that begins with a little sugar and some lemon and orange peels being mixed in a clay pot. Depending on the region, other ingredients such as whole coffee beans and cinnamon may be added. Everyone then gathers around the pot as aguardiente is poured over it and lit on fire. While the fire burns, distilling the drink, a spell is recited to “distance the bad spirits”. The spell is copied below in both English and Gallego. Queimada has become an iconic part of the Galician identity and is thought to have Celtic routes.
Galician food is best described as fresh and unique since every province has its own take on the traditional dishes. Food is simply prepared and includes whatever is in season. Pork and seafood are the dominant "meats". Potatoes and other root vegetables such as turnips are also prevalent since they grow well in Galicia's unpredictable weather. The fruity white Albariño wine is this region's most popular wine and Galicia's distilled liquors are also well known throughout Spain.


Food
Food
Food
Home
About
Way of St.James
Food
Music
Travel Tools
Located in the Northwest corner of Spain, the province of Galicia is one of four autonomous communities in Spain. It's unique language, celtic heritage, and famous pilmagrage site at Santiago de Compostela make it a must-see for any visitor to Spain.
Home
Quick Facts
Common Ingredient
Translations
Top 5 Foods to Try
Drinks and Desserts
Queimada
Food
2,
1.
Capital:
Santiago de
Compostela (in A Coruña)

Roughly the size of Belgium

Languages:
Gallego and
Castellano (Spanish)

Currency:
Euro

Has 4 distinct seasons

Nicknamed "España Verde" (Green Spain) because of its lush green landscape

Divided in 4 main provinces: A Coruña, Lugo, Pontevedra, and Orense


Emigration
Home
Emigration
History
Galicia's economy is mainly based on agriculture and fishing, making it highly susceptible to economic and political stressors. As a result, Galicia has had 4 major emigrant movements that reduced its work force and thus its economic development while also creating a unique "international" rather than internal gallego culture.



Here is a link to a map of Gallego communities around the world as seen in the photo above of South American oommunities:
http://emigracion.xunta.es/es/comunidades/directorio-centros-galegos-en-el-exterior
History
Home
Emigration
813
The remains of St. James (Santiago) the Apostle are discovered, sparking the pilgramage to the cathedral Santiago de Compostela
1936
Galician was first recognized as a distinct nationality, along with its own language but is unable to exercise its rights until after Franco's death in 1975.
19 B.C.E
.
The Romans defeat the Celtic resistance in the region and rule the area until about 400 B.C.E.
Ancient Times:
Galicia was inhabited by a Celtic Bonze Age Society as evidenced by the surviving hill forts called "castors". This is the start of their Celtic heritage.
1065
The Kingdom of Galicia and Portugal was formed in 1065 following the death of Ferdinand I of León.
In 1095, Portugal separated again.
1983
Revival of gallego language and gallego culture.
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History
Movement 1: Late 1800's
Economic downturns and a series of rough winters resulted in a mass emigration to Southern Spain and Central and South America by young, single males in search of work. Few of these emigrants were able to return to Galicia, thus establishing the first of many international "gallego" communities.

Movement 2: 1911-1930
In response to the political unrest of the Civil War and the resulting economic problems, another mass exodus occurred. This one included more young women than the first and a small percentage of the emigrants were able to return.
Movement 3: 1930-1960
This was during Franco's regime and was the largest emigration with the most economic consequences for Galicia due to the population reduction. This movement also included mostly single, young males and some females with few returning to Galicia
within
this time period.

Movement 4: 1960-Present Day
This contemporary emigrant movement has seen a change from single young men and women to whole families or pairs. There has also been a higher return rate to Galicia and emigrants have expanded to countries such as the United states, Canada, and other European countries as opposed to strictly Spanish speaking locations.
Katie Horvath
Nora Gerber

Citations

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Celtic_place_names_in_Galicia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Galicia
http://www.galiciaguide.com/Galicia-facts.html
http://www.insidersabroad.com/spain/regions/galizien
http://emigracion.xunta.es/es/comunidades/directorio-centros-galegos-en-el-exterior
http://www.galego.org/english/today/world.html
http://www.culturalresources.com/Maps.htm
Class notes, Romero, Fall 2013, Spanish 4567H
ABOUT
FOOD
http://spanishfood.about.com/od/spanishregionalcuisines/a/galicia.htm
http://www.nytimes.com/1983/06/26/travel/food-market-in-galicia.html
http://www.iberianfoods.co.uk/Galicia.htm
http://www.tripadvisor.com/Travel-g187508-c143161/Santiago-De-Compostela:Spain:Typical.Galician.Food.html
http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/gallego
Rick Steve's Spain 2012
Where to Stay
1. HostelWorld
http://www.hostelworld.com/

2. Hostels Club
http://www.hostelsclub.com/city_finder.php?lang=en&location=santiago+de+compostela&giorno=01&mese=12&anno=2013&notti=3&guests=2&currency=1&room_type=0&ref=left

3. Trip Advisor (hotels)
http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/Hotels-g187506-Galicia-Hotels.html

4. Late Rooms (hotels)
http://www.laterooms.com/en/r30008_hotels-in-galicia.aspx

5. Couch Surfing
(for the very adventurous)
https://www.couchsurfing.org/n/dashboard

A compilation of useful links to hostels, tours and more!
What to Say
1. OmniGlot
http://www.omniglot.com/language/phrases/galician.php

2. WikiTravel


http://wikitravel.org/en/Galician_phrasebook
Need to scroll down about 1/4 page for phrases
How to Go
Musical Artists
Festivals
Instruments
The sound of Galicia is an important part of this autonomous community's identity. The music of Galicia orginiates from its celtic roots, which are still strong today.

After the Franco Regime ended there was a resurgence of the celtic music, which is mainly played on bagpipes. While Franco was in power the traditional music of Gaicia was forbidden. Today, the bagpipe and the traditional music are a symbol for Galicia.
1. Airport

http://www.mydestination.com/galicia/usefulinfo/6179185/airports
Musical Artists
Carlos Nuñez
Milladoiro
Luar na Lubre
Susana Seivane
"He’s the undisputed master of Galicia’s signature musical instrument, the gaita, or Galician bagpipes."
One of the first bands to become famous for their music right after the fall of Franco. They first produced their music in 1978
One of the most popular and iconic bands of Galicia. They started in 1986 in A Coruna and have become international stars.
She comes from a family of well-known bagpipers and she has carried on the tradition
Carlos Nuñez
Videos
Information
Played with the Chieftains, an Irish Celtic Band
Inspired by Galicia and its beauty
He has embarked on his solo career.
Website
http://www.carlos-nunez.com/
Music Festivals
PortAmérica
Music festivals in Spain are experiences not to miss! There are both music festivals for traditional music enthusiasts as well as for more modern music afcionados.
Festival Ortigueira
"Un encuentro de Musica e Ideas" An encounter of music and ideas.
3 Day Concert July 18-20 at Porto de Mollo, Galicia, Spain
http://festival.portamerica.es/
One of the biggest and free music festivals with a focus on Galician Celtic music.
Started in 1978 and is located in A Courna, Galicia
www.festivaldeortigueira.com/festival/historia.php?lg=ing
Instruments
Bagpipes
Known as "gaita" in Spanish and can be refered to other kinds of pipes such as the clarinet or the recorder. The player blows air into the top pipe of the instrument into the bags. There are 7 holes, 3 on the left and 4 on the right. By covering these holes they are able to create different notes.
Hurdy-Gurdy
Known as "Zañfona" in Spanish and is a string instrument that one turns a wheel to create sound.
Other Intsruments:
Fiddle
Tambor (snare Drum)
Accordian
Flute
Bodhran (Celtic drum)
Quick Facts
Travel Tips
Pathways
Known in Spanish as "El Camino de Santiago de Compostela" this pilgrimage is over 1,000 years old and attracts people from all over the world on their own personal journey.
Quick Facts
Pathways
Travel Tips
The history of The Way of Saint James dates back to medieval times. Christian biblical history states that Saint James was taken from Jeruslem to Galicia and put in the Catheral of Compostela for rest.
2. Train


http://www.renfe.com/
http://www.feve.es/es/
3. Bus
http://www.monbus.es/index2.htm
Tours
1. TurGalicia: Comprehensive Galicia Tour Site
includes birdwatching, beaches, vineyards, city tours etc...anywhere in Galicia
helps you with booking and entrance fees
http://www.turgalicia.es/portada?langId=en_US
http://www.totallyspain.com/spain_travel_itineries.asp?id=10
There are multiple pathways to Santiago de Compostela. The most popular are through France and Spain
2. Totally Spain
great 7 or 10 day Galicia tour itineraries
helps you with booking and entrance fees
Home
Home
Home
Music
Music
Music
Artists
Camino Frances
Camino Portugues
Camino Frances
Starts: St Jean Pied de Port and 780km later you arrive in Santiago
Hike the foothills of the Pyrenees
Camino Portugues
Start your Journey in Portugal Lisbon and go 616 Km until Santiago, or start in Porto and go 240 Km
Referred to as the "Friendly Camino"
The path was once used during the Roman Empire
1.)
You need a Pilgrim's Passport
From the US: Go Here
http://www.americanpilgrims.com/
2.)
Albergues = Hostels.
These vary from point to point and cost 7 Euros -10 Euros on average. Go here for more info: http://www.caminoadventures.com/pilgrim-hostels/
3.) Don't Forget!
Rain gear
Sunscreen
Earplugs
Go Here for more complete list of essentials: http://www.caminoadventures.com/packing-list/
4.) Gastronomy
Don't worry, you don't have to pack all your meals for your trip. There are many delicious dishes as you travel to different regions of Spain from Aragon to Galicia.
For More information: http://www.spain.info/en/reportajes/la_gastronomia_el_plato_fuerte_del_camino_de_santiago.html

Modern day Pilgrimages people travel for many different reasons: spiritual, self-exploration, adventure, and relgious
Over 1,000,000 people hike the Camino each year
The Way
The Way
The Way
Paths
The symbol for the journey is a scallop shell. It has many stories surrounding the item.
It metaphor the many routes that can be taken to Santiago
It was said that the Medieval Pilgrims wore the shells as a badge to signify to others their journey
Represents Galicia as a coastal city
Paths
Luar Na Lubre
Videos
Information
Iconic Galicia band with 8 members that continue to reinterpret traditional songs om Galicia's rich past
Received the " Ideal award as Best Galician Folk Group"
Website
http://www.luarnalubre.com/
Artists
Milladorio
Videos
Information
One of the most famous traditional bands of Galicia.
Formed in 1978
Won the Goya Award for Best Original Score
Website
http://www.milladoiro.com/
Artists
Susana Seivane
Videos
Information
Started playing bagpipes when she was 3 years old.
2001 she was a finalist for the Indie Awards for Best Artist in Contemporary World Music
Website
http://www.susanaseivane.net/en/
Artists
Camino
http://www.caminoadventures.com/
http://maps.peterrobins.co.uk/routes.html
http://www.caminoways.com/blog/2013/04/03/the-scallop-shell-and-the-camino-de-santiago/
http://www.spain.info/en/reportajes/la_gastronomia_el_plato_fuerte_del_camino_de_santiago.html
http://www.hikingthecamino.com/on-the-way/accommodation/pilgrim-hostels-albergues
http://www.americanpilgrims.com/camino/faqs.html#credential
http://www.americanpilgrims.com/camino/credential_req.html
http://www.santiago-compostela.net/portugues/index_cp_en.html
http://www.caminoguides.com/history.html
http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/669

Music
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/luar-na-lubre-mn0000524071
http://www.susanaseivane.net/en/
http://www.carlos-nunez.com/
http://www.luarnalubre.com/enlaces.php?idioma=en
http://www.luarnalubre.com/grupo.php?idioma=en
http://www.sfcelticmusic.com/spain/celtica.htm
http://www.mydestination.com/galicia/usefulinfo/6179185/airports
http://www.mydestination.com/galicia/usefulinfo/6175624/music
http://www.mydestination.com/galicia/travel-articles/72314/grooving-in-galicia
http://www.festivaldeortigueira.com/festival/historia.php?lg=ing
http://www.spainisculture.com/en/fiestas/coruna_a/festival_del_mundo_celta_de_ortigueira.html
http://festival.portamerica.es/

Romero, Eugenia. Amusement Parks, Bagpipes, and Cemeteries: Fantastic Spaces of Galician Identity through Emigration. Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies Vol. 7, No. 2 July 2006, pp. 155􏰀169.
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