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Australian Convicts: 1788-1901

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michael song

on 6 April 2014

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Transcript of Australian Convicts: 1788-1901

Transportation of convicts
Penal transportation is the exporting of convicts to a different colony. All together, more than 165,000 convicted criminals have been transported to Australia. The reason for penal transportation was that the British Government could not control and could not accommodate containment of the overflowing population of convicts, thus they fulfill their prison sentence in Australia.
Penal transportation
The First Fleet
Upon arrival, convicts were forced into prolong working hours everyday enduring poverty and social injustice. In early days of New South Wales, convicts were put into labor according to their professions; building, farming, etc. However, as the population of free settlers increased, the demand in cheap labor and expansion of land were huge priorities. Thus, a large proportions of convicts were released to them for slavery.

Many convicts were under brutal discipline such as working while chained up in heavy metal and being whipped constantly.
Arrival of Convicts: Australia
Contact between Aboringals and the British
As the expansion of settlement continued, the sacred lands of the Aboriginals were being cleared for growing livestock, building infrastructure and cultivating crops. Often Aboriginals were killed at sight by convicts working in farms for theft of farm animals.

Also, the British including the convicts introduced new diseases into Australia that caused a smallpox epidemic which decimated the population of the Eora people.
Impact on Aboriginal people
Australian Convicts: 1788-1901
Michael Song
Governor Macquarie
Governor Macquarie aimed to compensate the damages done by the process of the colonisation on his behalf by providing the Aboriginals with education. He established the Macquarie Native Institution, a boarding school situated in Parramatta. The conditions were appalling and many Koori families abandoned the mainlands of Sydney cove for ensuring the safety of their children.

British Soldiers were sent out to hunt and take the children by force in order to send them to school. Unfortunately many Aboriginal children never saw their families again.
Impact on Aboriginal people
Impact on the development of Australia
Convicts working
Without the convicts, the infrastructure and services surrounding the British settlement would not have existed; constructors, carpenters, shepherds, farmers, nurses, etc. Convicts were responsible for the establishment of the British colony in Australia and were of great importance.
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