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Lord of the Flies, Chapter 10

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by

Gina D'Incau

on 29 August 2013

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Transcript of Lord of the Flies, Chapter 10

Settings
While removing his glasses and switching his lenses from eye-to-eye, Piggy sees a figure approaching him. The figure is Ralph, and he is limping, dirty, has dead leaves in his hair, and the one eye was slit in his puffy cheek and has a scab on his right knee. The little ones are collecting wood while Piggy and Ralph talk. Ralph holds the conch and Piggy asks if he's going to call an assembly, which Ralph laughs at in response. Ralph is recalling the fact that Simon was murdered and is in shock. He keeps insisting that it was dark and they were scared. Piggy reassures him that it was an accident.
Summary
Summary (cont.)
Summary (cont.)
Roger appears at the neck of the island and is challenged to see who he truly is under the chief's orders. Robert announces that the chief is going to beat Wilfred, and that they tied him up. Roger asks if the chief said why, and Robert said he never heard him. Roger climbed down the rocks towards the cave and the rest of the tribe, and faced the chief. Wilfred was newly beaten and untied. The chief separates the duties of defenders and hunters in order to have defense in case the monster returned.
Summary (cont.)
Beach
The beach is where Ralph, Piggy, Sam, and Eric are staying, while the others live in the caves. At the beach, they create fires and work together to survive. They protect one another, provide for the group, and are able to avoid the monster living in the forest. It is a more intelligent environment with a strict basis leaning towards finding a way to signal their presence on the island and get help.
Caves
In the caves, Jack and the other hunters are residing within it away from Ralph and the other three. They work with one another, hunt together, and come up with plans to avoid and potentially attack the monster. It's deeper underground to demonstrate their ruggedness. The caves prove how the hunters' main concern is constantly hunting and stealing from the group to demonstrate their power.
Gina D'Incau
Chapter 10: The Shell and the Glasses
Piggy then says that they should forget what happened to Simon and Ralph says he's frightened and just wants to go home. In an attempt to comfort Ralph, Piggy touches his shoulder, and Ralph shudders from the contact. The twins, Eric and Sam, appear from the forest with wood and add it to the fire and are going to get a bath in the pool. They are surprised to see Ralph, since he got lost after the feast. Piggy claims they left early because they were tired. The twins ask about how the dance went, and all four boys shake because none of them attended it. Rather, the reply is "We left early" (Golding 158).
It is assumed that the monster is disguised, and that he may come back even though they gave him a head of their kill to him. When asked how to kill the monster, the chief merely says to leave the mountain alone. The tribe was shaken by the idea that they couldn't predict what the monster might come and do. The chief is preparing to go hunting the next day, and the question about how to light the fire makes the chief blush. He then announces that they're going to take fire from the others. Maurice and Roger will go with the chief just before sunset to go and retrieve the fire while the others sleep.
Characters
Major:
Conflicts
Man vs. Man: Hunters vs. Ralph's Group
Conflicts
Man vs. Supernatural: Groups vs. Monster
Conflicts
Man vs. Self: Ralph and His Power
Themes
Innocence:
Themes
Hope:
Themes
Activity
In the middle of the room, there is a bin full of puzzle pieces. There are two separate puzzles that need to be made. You must work together as a group to figure out which piece goes to which puzzle. The puzzles are ultimately summaries of chapter nine and ten. Good luck!
Ralph: In this chapter, Ralph is focused on using the smoke from the fire to signal to the planes involved in the war overhead to assist them and rescue them from the island. Ralph in the beginning starts to completely deny his power as chief and no longer wants to rule over the few that do remain since the others left with Jack. When attacked by Jack and the hunters, he fights back automatically. He is very reactive, and is very protective of the few in the group - Piggy especially. His main concern is looking out for the welfare of the whole group and not merely himself.
Characters
Minor:
Summary (cont.)
Ralph and Piggy were working together to light the damp wood for fire, but they were unsuccessful. Eric breathed on the wood and a little flame sparked and the group reminisces. Eric is to the point where he is too tired and no longer wants to carry firewood and freaks out and then flings himself to the ground. Ralph decides that they will only light the wood in the morning and two people will watch it for twelve hours a day so that the smoke could signal their presence. Ralph is dreaming of common things that would be going on at home until Eric and Sam were found fighting each other. Noises are heard at the camp, and the assumption of the monster is made. There is snarling, and then he bit the fingers found in his mouth. Jack and the hunters had attacked.
Summary (cont.)
The hunters left and there were a few slight injuries. Luckily, the hunters didn't retrieve the conch, which was Piggy's main concern. Jack did in fact gain possession of Piggy's glasses though.
Settings (cont.)
Forest:
The forest provides many different purposes and symbols. Within the forest, there are supplies such as wood, animals for food, etc. used in order to survive. It’s comfortable in the sense that it is able to bestow these supplies upon both groups. But the fact that the monster may be lurking in their creates a symbol of uncertainty. In the forest, anything could happen. The forest relates to the chapter in the sense that both groups are uncertain about what they are going to do on the island in order to survive, get help, or even to work together as one whole group again.
Characters (cont.)
Major:
Jack (Chief): Jack is consumed with his own ego full-force in this chapter. He is manipulative, and he strives for more power. He plans to steal the fire from Ralph’s group and constantly discusses hunting with his group of Reds. His main goal is to look out for himself individually. He is very cocky when answering questions in his group to demonstrate his superiority over them as well. This chapter emphasizes how Jack is utterly focused on proving power more than survival, especially once he steals Piggy’s glasses for his own gain instead of working with Ralph’s group.
Characters (cont.)
Major:
Piggy: Even though Piggy doesn’t have as crucial as a role in assisting with tasks to aide in his group’s survival as the others, his role is very important within the chapter. Piggy is highly intelligent and consistently tells Ralph how fantastic he is as a leader. He can’t work much due to his asthma and is made fun of for it. At the very end, his glasses are stolen. He is fragile and can’t do much in this chapter, but he plays a sufficient role in being a good friend to Ralph.
Jack's group of hunters attack Ralph's group at the very end of the chapter to try and steal their fire. Rather, Jack takes Piggy's glasses. At first, Ralph's group was under the impression that it was the monster once "there was a vicious snarling in the mouth of the shelter and the plunge and thump of living things" (Golding 167). The group was at first afraid of the monster attacking, but once hits were made and the realization that it was the hunters, they all fought back and were able to force them to leave. If it wasn't for their immediate reaction, the group would have been severely injured and could have potentially had a lot more damage to their shelter. This conflict proves how much the tenants of the island are breaking apart.
The groups are both unsure about the monster and its existence in general. But the groups, mainly the hunters, prepare for the monster in case it attacks. The hunters are under the impression that ""He came - disguised. He may come again even though we gave him the head of our kill to eat"" (Golding 160). Ralph's group is also preparing their group in case the monster would happen to come unexpectedly as well. Due to its unpredictability, the groups are on edge in case of any attack.
Ralph is unsure of his power as a chief since Jack and the hunters formed their own group. Whenever Piggy insisted that they call an assembly, "Ralph laughed sharply as he said the word..." (Golding 156). Also, Ralph laughed whenever Piggy said he was still chief. This insinuates that Ralph isn't believing in his capabilities as chief, even though he is a decent one. It's an inner conflict that he denies his own capabilities.
Eric: Eric is one of the twins who collects wood in the forest and gets in a fight with his brother, Sam. He’s very young, and when he’s tired from carrying wood, he has a fit and flings himself onto the ground.
Sam: Sam is the one of the twins who collects wood in the forest. He gets in a fight with his brother, Eric.
Wilfred: Wilfred is beaten and tied up by the tribe once they are ordered by Jack to do so.
Roger: Roger comes to the neck of the island and is challenged before entering the cave with the rest of the tribe.
Stanley: Stanley is part of the tribe and asks the chief questions about what to do if the monster is disguised as well as how it is possible to kill it.
Ralph reflects on Simon’s murder at the very beginning of the chapter and whispered to Piggy at first, demonstrating his shock and disbelief after his death.
Ralph even “cradling the conch, rocked himself to and fro” (Golding 157) that illustrated his childlike response to an overwhelming and depressing situation that a child shouldn’t be faced with.
Piggy keeps insisting that Simon’s death was an accident, but Ralph still can’t forgive himself for it.
Ralph’s group keeps their hope alive to get rescued from the island when they keep lighting the fire to have smoke signal their presence.
The group was not giving up and “The wood was damp; and this was the third time they had lighted it” (Golding 162). They were willing to keep on going until they got the fire going to signal their presence on the island and get help, no matter how much they lost faith in a rescue.
Once the fire was lighted, the group was divided so that two people would watch the fire every twelve hours in order to keep the fire going. By doing this, their entire focus was on getting help and not giving up their faith in surviving and returning home.

Prejudice is mainly towards Piggy because he’s larger and has asthma. Since he’s bigger, they don’t think he has as much input as the others.
Whenever Jack and the hunters attack, they mocked Piggy pretending to be the monster and said, “”Piggy, come outside. I want you, Piggy”” (Golding 166). This is more of their desire for control in order to manipulate Piggy and scare him.
At the very end of the chapter, Jack has retrieved Piggy’s glasses, which represents his intelligence.
Prejudice:
Discussion Questions:
1. Why do you think Jack has suddenly broken off from Ralph’s group and decided to steal the fire from them?
2. Is there any possibility that Piggy is using his asthma as a crutch so he can't embarrass himself?
3. Could the hunters turn against Jack at some point?
4. Could the twins leave Ralph’s group at any point, or are they too young to understand what’s going on between the group and Jack’s tribe?
5. What are probable ideas when it comes to Jack having Piggy’s glasses? Could he use them as a bribe, threat, to his own advantage, etc.?
Bibliography:
Golding, William. Lord of the Flies. New York City: The Berkeley Publishing Group, 1954. Print.
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