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Sentence Structure

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Jon Nichols

on 24 August 2015

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Transcript of Sentence Structure

Sentence Construction
In English writing, there are 3 basic types of sentences:


The Simple Sentence
A simple sentence contains at least a subject and a verb, and it expresses a complete thought.

For example: "It is" will be considered a sentence. The sentence contains a subject "It" and a verb "is".

Simple sentences do not mean short! Simple sentences can also be quite long.




Answers
Compound Sentences
A sentence containing two or more coordinate independent clauses, usually joined by one or more conjunctions, but no dependent clause.
Complex Sentences
A complex sentence contains one or more dependent clauses in addition to the independent clause.

Remember:

An independent clause can stand alone as it's own sentence.

A dependent clause usually adds some extra details or information to the independent clause.

Confused? Let's look at some examples
Complex Sentence Examples...
Directions: underline the dependent clause and double underline the independent clause.
Directions: underline the dependent clause and double underline the independent clause.
1. After Ahmed caught the fish, Jameel caught one also.

2. If Louise goes to the store, she will be late for the
movie.

3. I don't like the painting although the colors are beautiful.

4. We will study sentence structure today unless you have a better idea?

5. After we visited the museum, we went to the park.

6. We should begin as soon as he arrives.

7. While you were away, the children made dinner.
Your turn! Explain to review.
Sentence Structure
Ahead
Warning!
Simple
Complex
Compound
Which of the following do you think are good examples of simple sentences? Be prepared to support your answer.
1. Play on.

2. You are late.

3. Alia and her friends had dinner at a nice restaurant.

4. Many of us do not agree with the new rules or the attendance policies from the administration.
The short answer is that all of the sentences below are simple sentences! How do we know? Count the
independent
clauses. An independent clause contains a subject and a verb and it can stand on it's own without a dependent clause. (we will discuss clauses soon).
1. Play on.
This simple sentence includes a subject, verb, and adjective. It completes a thought.
This simple sentence is an imperative--it gives direction to the listener. The subject is implied
(i.e.,
you
is the implied subject even if it's not specifically stated).
2. You are late.
3. Alia and her friends had dinner at a nice restaurant.

Although this sentence is longer, there is only one verb (had) and one independent clause.

4. Many of us do not agree with the new rules or the attendance policies from the administration.
Even simple sentences can be quite complex, but again, how many verbs do you see? Is the sentence a complete thought?
Let's take a closer look at our examples
Some students use the term
FANBOYS
to remember the coordinating connectors
for
Coordinating conjunction is just a fancy word to include the following words:
but
yet
and
nor
or
so
When, Why, and How
1. We use coordinating conjunctions to join two
independent
clauses.
2. We use compound sentences when our independent clauses are related in some way and we wish to join our clauses together into one sentence.
3. Independent Clause + comma + conjunction + Independent Clause
Examples
1. James cried out
,
yet nobody heard him.
2. Mariam was happy
,
but her mother was not!
3. Lisa didn't see the problem
,
or she didn't care.
4. Hamed loved his horses
,
and his horses loved him.
conj
IC
IC
Bonus Question:
Can you make the above compound sentences into two simple sentences?
Ex: If I were you
,
I wouldn't do that!
Notice the comma that we use when the dependent clause comes first!
Complex sentences are easy to identify because you can switch the dependent and independent clauses.
Ex: I wouldn't do that if I were you!
Notice we lost our comma.
What changed?
What's the difference between a dependent and independent clause?
Good question...

An independent clause can stand on it's own as a complete sentence.


A dependent clause cannot!

Look at the example below and identify the dependent and independent clause. Which one can be a complete sentence?
After we left, she decided to throw a party.
Simple
Compound
complex
Full transcript