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Keep Your Water Cold!

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by

Chelsea Garcia

on 2 February 2013

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Transcript of Keep Your Water Cold!

Keep Your Water Cold By: Chelsea Garcia Problem Materials If a plastic cup is used, then the
temperature of the water will have the
smallest change. Hypothesis Independent:
-Cup’s material (plastic, Styrofoam, Glass)
Dependent:
-Water temperature change
Constants:
-Amount of water
-Temperature of after will be measured at the same time
-Type of water
-The starting temperature of water Variables Which type of cup will
keep water the coldest: Styrofoam, plastic, or glass? •3 Styrofoam cups
•3 Plastic cups
•3 Glass cups
•1 Thermometer
•100mL of cold water
•1 Graduated cylinder
•1 Thermometer stand
•1 Marker
•1 Pencil/Pen (Blue or Black)•1 Paper to record data
•1 Stopwatch Procedure Data Table Temperature (Celsius) Trial 1 Trial 2 Trial 3 Type of Cup Styrofoam Plastic I I I Glass 18 22 F F D D D +4 18 23 +5 18 21 +3 16 16 16 15 -1 16 0 17 +1 15 15 15 14 -1 16 +1 15 0 1. Label the 3 Styrofoam cups
as “Trial 1,” “Trial 2,” and
“Trial 3.” 2. Repeat step 1 for the 3 glass
and plastic cups. 3. Measure 100mL of cold water with a graduated cylinder. 4. Pour the 100mL into your first Styrofoam cup that should read “Trial 1.” 5. Measure the “beginning” temperature for your first trial with a Styrofoam cup using a thermometer. 6. Leave the thermometer in your Styrofoam cup “Trial 1” for 10 seconds using your stopwatch. 7. Write down the “beginning” temperature using your paper and pencil/pen. 8. Leave your cup by itself for 10 minutes 9. Measure the “after” temperature after waiting for 10 minutes using once again the thermometer. 10. Leave the thermometer in the cup, again, for 10 seconds. 11. Write down the “after” temperature for
“Trial 1” with a Styrofoam cup. 12. Calculate the change in
temperature between the beginning and
ending temperature. 13. Write down the temperature difference in your data table. 14. Repeat steps 3-13 with “Trial 2” and “Trial 3” using a Styrofoam Graph Conclusion The scientist wanted to test if the material of a cup had anything to do with how long it could stay cold. For the experiment, 100mL of cold water were measured, and then poured into the styrofoam cup that read”Trial 1”. The beggining temperature was measured and then griten down. After waiting for 10 minutes, the ending temperature was then measured and griten down. These steps were repeated two more times using the same cup materialand then repeated for plastic and glass cups, in three separate trials respectively. The ending temperature using a plastic cup for trial 1 was 15 degree Celsius, for trial 2 it was 16 degree Celsius, and for trial 3, the ending temperature was 17 degree Celsius.The ending temperature using a styrofoam cup for trial 1 was 22 degree Celsius, for trial 2 it was 23 degree Celsius, and for trial 3 it was 21 degree Celsius. Lastly, the ending temperature for trial 1 using a glass cup was 14 degree Celsius, for trial 2 it was 16 degree Celsius, and for trial 3 it was 15 degree Celsius. After studying the data, the scientist noticed that the type of cup did, in fact, have to do with the time period a drink stays cold. The glass cup was the material that had the smallest change in temperature. In conclusion, the hipótesis for this experiment was proved incorrect. The scientist wanted to test if the material of a cup had anything to do with how long it could stay cold. For the experiment, 100mL of cold water were measured, and then poured into the styrofoam cup that read”Trial 1”. The beggining temperature was measured and then griten down. After waiting for 10 minutes, the ending temperature was then measured and griten down. These steps were repeated two more times using the same cup materialand then repeated for plastic and glass cups, in three separate trials respectively. The ending temperature using a plastic cup for trial 1 was 15 degree Celsius, for trial 2 it was 16 degree Celsius, and for trial 3, the ending temperature was 17 degree Celsius.The ending temperature using a styrofoam cup for trial 1 was 22 degree Celsius, for trial 2 it was 23 degree Celsius, and for trial 3 it was 21 degree Celsius. Lastly, the ending temperature for trial 1 using a glass cup was 14 degree Celsius, for trial 2 it was 16 degree Celsius, and for trial 3 it was 15 degree Celsius. After studying the data, the scientist noticed that the type of cup did, in fact, have to do with the time period a drink stays cold. The glass cup was the material that had the smallest change in temperature. In conclusion, the hipótesis for this experiment was proved incorrect. Bibliography Works Cited "Glass or plastic what keeps water colder?" The Q&A wiki. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2012. <http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Glass_or_plastic_what_keeps_water_colder>.
"Which type of cup keeps a cold drink for longer a glass cup or a plastic cup." The Q&A wiki. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Sept. 2012. <http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Which_type_of_cup_keeps_a_cold_drink_for_longer_a_glass_cup_or_a_plastic_cup>.
Wyatt, Mary L.. "Does a Drink Stay Colder in a Metal Can or a Plastic Glass Plastic Styrofoam Thanks For Waching!
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