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Simulated Walkthrough for pd (Leaders, Coaches, Teachers)

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Nichole Pike

on 17 June 2010

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Transcript of Simulated Walkthrough for pd (Leaders, Coaches, Teachers)

"Walking through"
the common instructional framework …If we could move from using a variety of strategies to create a level of instructional consistency – predictable for students – within a school we might be able to move to the next level of achievement. Our intention is not to minimize the fact that there are discipline-specific literacy strategies. We know that reading like a scientist is different than reading like a historian or art critic. However there are simply far too many students who read, write and think far below grade level to assume that generic strategies won’t help.

One of the unintended consequences of the proliferation of instructional strategies is that many teachers are overwhelmed and feel the need to collect strategies then shove them into their already full class periods. In the absence of an instructional framework, teachers are at risk of becoming “strategy junkies.”

Comprehension Instruction By Block, Morrow, and Parris; pg. 262
Collaborative Group Work:

Is Strategic -- brings students together INTENTIONALLY in small groups for the common purpose of engaging in learning and/or completing a task. each student IS held accountable for contributing to the group work

HAS WELL-designed ACTIVITES so that students with diverse skill levels are supported as well as challenged by their peers

ALLOWS STUDENTS TO WORK TOGETHER TO EVALUATE THEIR PROGRESS ON AN ASSIGNED TASK WRITING TO LEARN:

enables students to experiment every day with written language, increasing their fluency and mastery of written conventions

EMPOWERs STUDENTS to ARTICULATE AND develop their ideas, their critical thinking ability and their writing skills THROUGH low-tO high-stakes writing TASKS. STUDENTS WRITE AND REVISE IN ORDER TO CLARIFY THEIR THINKING

can also be used as formative assessment and as a way to scaffold mid- and high-stakes writing assignments and tests QUESTIONING:

Effective questioning (by the teacher and by students) deepens classroom conversations and the level of discourse

Teachers AND STUDENTS use this strategy to ALLOW students to investigate, analyze, AND REFINE their thinking as well as the thinking of their peers. FURTHER, Students APPLY THIS STRATEGY TO ANALYZE TEXTS CRITICALLY

challenges students and teachers to use good questions as a way to open conversations and DEEPEN intellectual inquiry; COMPLEXIFIES CONTENT-AREA CONVERSATIONS
SCAFFOLDING:

helps students to BUILD ON prior knowledge TO CURRENT LEARNING THRoUGH ACTIVITIES, DISCUSSION, AND ASSESSMENTS

WHEN used effectively, connects students' previous learning in a content area, MAKES LINKS across content, BUILDS ON previous learning in an earlier grade, AND ANTICIPATES NEW LEARNING

facilitateS STUDENTS' thinking about a text by asking students to draw on their subjective experience and prior learning to make connections to new materials and ideas Classroom Talk:

creates the space for students to articulate and REFINE their thinking THROUGH MEANINGFUL DIALOGUE; EFFECTIVE CLASSROOM TALK FACILITATES questioning, supports effective scaffolding, collaborative group work and literacy groups

IS RELEVANT TO CONTENT, CONTEXT, and IT SUPPORTS ENDURING LEARNING AND ACTIVATES NEW LEARNING

IS EVIDENT IN PAIRS, SMALL AND LARGE GROUPS AND in/AS WHOLE GROUPS
Literacy Groups:

provide students with a collaborative structure for understanding a variety of texts and engaging in a higher level of discourse

Group roles INITIALLY drive literacy groups by giving each student a role to play and a defined purpose within the group. STUDENTS INTERNALIZE THESE PRACTICES TO SCAFFOLD AND OWN THEIR LEARNING

roles or discussion guidelines may vary for different content areas, lengths of texts, or student level of sophistication using this strategy

raise student engagement with texts by creating a structure within which they may do so. Why a "Walk Through?" To examine the effectiveness of implementation and course correct if necessary
Deepen the Common Instructional Framework (CIF)
Plan timely, appropriate, high-leverage pd that deepens the CIF Address pd needs based on trend data and classroom observations Work in/as teams (school leader, instructional coach, teacher) to determine appropriate pd based on trend data Reviewing one scenario Classroom Observation Tally
What is your pd focus?

Giveaways
Three walk-through tools for your schools: Rounds Pacing Guide
"Rigor in the Curriculum" Rubric
Venn Diagram on Rigor Common Instructional Framework Plan your pd session

What will you do? Why?
How will you do it? How did you determine its relevance? Why an Instructional Framework? Mock Walk Through What trends do you see? 2010
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