Loading presentation...

Present Remotely

Send the link below via email or IM

Copy

Present to your audience

Start remote presentation

  • Invited audience members will follow you as you navigate and present
  • People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi account
  • This link expires 10 minutes after you close the presentation
  • A maximum of 30 users can follow your presentation
  • Learn more about this feature in our knowledge base article

Do you really want to delete this prezi?

Neither you, nor the coeditors you shared it with will be able to recover it again.

DeleteCancel

Make your likes visible on Facebook?

Connect your Facebook account to Prezi and let your likes appear on your timeline.
You can change this under Settings & Account at any time.

No, thanks

Where do the Algonquins live?

No description
by

Jess Ml

on 6 March 2014

Comments (0)

Please log in to add your comment.

Report abuse

Transcript of Where do the Algonquins live?

The Algonquians lived north of Lake Huron and Lake Superior. They lived in small villages like the Iroquois and lived in smaller groups with about 20 to 40 people who moved to different locations as seasons changed.
In the summer months the Algonquins lived in small villages that were home to only a couple of families, or they lived in larger villages that were home to hundredths of people. They could fish, hunt, trap and sometimes they could farm. As the winter season came closer the village would separate into smaller groups to follow the wild animals they needed for food.
The 5 great lakes
Some Algonquians farmed for food like beans, squash, or corn while others killed animals like duck, deer, beaver, rabbit, bear, turkey, or moose depending on where they lived and the changing months.
Food
Where did the Algonquians live?
In the summer months people farmed and grew crops like beans, pumpkins, corn, or squash and made their own tools out of shells and branches to hoe the soil. People also used tools like spears, bone hooks, nets and wicker traps to hunt and trap animals for food and clothing. They trapped animals like duck, deer, beaver, rabbit, bear, turkey and moose. When winter came, the Algonquins trapped and hunted for animals while the lakes and rivers froze and the ground couldn't be used for growing crops or finding berries.
Shelter
They would have bark and woven mats tied to the frame and they would most likely use a leather door and the ground covered with fir branches to help keep warm when winter came. Finally, at the top there would be a hole to help the smoke escape from the fire that the Algonquians burned to keep warm in the middle of the wigwam.
The Algonquins lived in cone-shaped and dome-shaped wigwams. Wigwams were built by bending and than tying the tops of small trees together.
Clothing
First, the animal skin was "tanned", then stretched to make soft leather. They used the leather to make moccasins, shirts, robes, dresses, leggings and other clothes and items. One common animal skin that the Algonquians used was deer skin because there were a lot of deers available for hunters. Two other animals the Algonquians would get the animal skin from was raccoon and elk.
The Algonquians wore clothing using the pelts or the hides from the mammals they killed. The pelts were animal skin with fur still on it and the hides were animal skin with no fur on it.
The Algonquians Of The Eastern Woodlands
By: Jessica
Roles
The men, women, and children all had different responsibilities in the Algonquian society.
Women took care of their children, made clothing, decorated pottery to be used for meals, collected nuts, berries, and any plants besides those that could be used in anyway, and they also took down, carried, and set up the family wigwam.
Men fished, hunted, trapped, and made tools for activities out of bark or wood from the forest.
Trade
First Nation groups didn't have money to buy certain items they wanted back than, so they needed to trade their items for other items they wanted in exchange.
For example, one First Nation group might have water near by and have a lot of fish to eat, but they didn't have that much animal fur to make clothes and other items, while another First Nation group might not have many fish to eat, but they don't have animal fur to make clothing and other items. Those two First Nation groups would find each other and make a trade in exchange for what they asked for, but sometimes it can't work that way. You can't always get what you asked for because of course you need to be reasonable and you need to know whats a good trade and whats bad trade.
Men
Women
Roles
Children
Children collected berries and other crops that they could use to make arrowheads, to play games to help them grow strong, and to listen to the stories of their elders to learn how they lived.
Fun Facts
- the Algonquians all spoke a form of he Algonquian language
-
By: Jessica
Warning:
There is going to be a quiz at the end of my presentation, so pay extra attention!
Now I have a fun quiz for you!
Thank you for watching my presentation! I hope you enjoyed.
Beliefs
The Algonquians believed that everything had a spirit such as animals, rocks, and plants. They believed that all had to be treated with respect.
The Algonquian people would have a shaman who was believed to help connect their own spirit to help find why someone was sick by often putting a tube or other object on the area where the body was aching or hurting and the shaman would ask the spirit to remove the sickness.
Beliefs
Full transcript