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"Tonight I Can Write" Commentary Presentation

ENG 3U7 example presentation
by

Rebecca Green

on 21 November 2017

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Transcript of "Tonight I Can Write" Commentary Presentation

Tonight I Can Write
Read by Tom O'Bedlam
Tonight I Can Write
introduction of tone
Write, for example, 'The night is starry
and the stars are blue and
shiver
in the
distance
.'

The night wind revolves in the sky and sings.

Tonight I can write the saddest lines.
I loved her, and sometimes she loved me too.

Through nights like this one I held her in my arms.
I kissed her again and again under the
endless
sky.

She loved me, sometimes I loved her too.
How could one not have loved her great still eyes.

imagery
Tonight I can write the saddest lines.
To

think
that I do not have her.
To

feel
that I have lost her.

To

hear
the immense night, still more
immense
without her.
And the verse falls to the soul like dew to the pasture.

What does it matter that my love could not keep her.
The night is
starry
and she is not with me.

A little context:
Beasley, Sandra. "Neruda, Pablo." In Arana, Victoria R., ed. The Facts On File Companion to World Poetry, 1900 to the Present. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2008. Bloom's Literature. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 24 Nov. 2014
"Tonight I Can Write" by Pablo Neruda
"Tonight I Can Write" Commentary
In 1924 Neruda's second book was published, Veinte poemas de amor y una canción desperada (Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair), from which he gained a large and fervent audience. Poems such as "I Like for You to Be Still" and "Tonight I Can Write" fixed Neruda's place in the hearts of young lovers and scholarly critics, who admired his tonal balance between that of mournful adult and enthralled child. The women of his poems bridge the void between an ascetic male speaker and the delights of the natural universe: Pressed to identify his muses, Neruda demurred: "Marisol and Marisombra: Sea and Sun, Sea and Shadow. Marisol is love in the enchanted countryside … dark eyes like the wet sky of Temuco … Marisombra is the student in the city. Gray beret, very gentle eyes…." These dichotic figures had real-life counterparts, pursued by the poet in what would be a pattern of simultaneous love affairs. (Beasley)


Neruda Vive - "Tonight I Can Write The Saddest Lines" by Pablo Neruda Read by Tom O"bedlam. Perf. Tom O'Bedlam. YouTube. YouTube, 31 Aug. 2013. Web. 24 Nov. 2014.
Tonight I can write the saddest lines.

Write, for example, 'The night is starry
and the stars are blue and shiver in the distance.'

The night wind revolves in the sky and sings.

Tonight I can write the saddest lines.
I loved her, and sometimes she loved me too.

Through nights like this one I held her in my arms.
I kissed her again and again under the endless sky.

She loved me, sometimes I loved her too.
How could one not have loved her great still eyes.

Tonight I can write the saddest lines.
To think that I do not have her. To feel that I have lost her.

To hear the immense night, still more immense without her.
And the verse falls to the soul like dew to the pasture.

What does it matter that my love could not keep her.
The night is starry and she is not with me.

This is all. In the distance someone is singing. In the distance.
My soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

My sight tries to find her as though to bring her closer.
My heart looks for her, and she is not with me.

The same night whitening the same trees.
We, of that time, are no longer the same.

I no longer love her, that's certain, but how I loved her.
My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing.

Another's. She will be another's. As she was before my kisses.
Her voice, her bright body. Her infinite eyes.

I no longer love her, that's certain, but maybe I love her.
Love is so short, forgetting is so long.

Because through nights like this one I held her in my arms
my soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

Though this be the last pain that she makes me suffer
and these the last verses that I write for her.


translated by W.S. Merwin

Tonight I can
write
the
saddest
lines.
introduction of topic
caesurae and stanzas
This is all. In the distance someone is singing. In the distance.
My soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

My sight tries to find her as though to bring her closer.
My heart looks for her, and she is not with me.

The same night whitening the same trees.
We, of that time, are no longer the same.

I no longer love her, that's certain, but how I loved her.
My voice tried to find the wind to touch her hearing.

Another's. She will be another's. As she was before my kisses.
Her voice, her bright body. Her infinite eyes.

paradox and antithesis

I no longer love her, that's certain, but maybe I love her.
Love is so short, forgetting is so long.

Because through nights like this one I held her in my arms
my soul is not satisfied that it has lost her.

Though this be the last pain that she makes me suffer
and these the last verses that I write for her.

Moonset over coast. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 24 Nov 2014.
"Moonset Over Coast of Chile"
Commentary by Rebecca Green
In "Tonight I Can Write," the stanzas and caesurae illustrate the fragmented, conflicted feeling of the speaker as he describes his separation from his lover. Imagery and antithesis serve to further illuminate the way in which the speaker uses writing to mourn and commemorate the loss of his lover.
my assertion:
Neruda, Pablo. "Tonight I Can Write." Trans. W. S. Merwin. Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair. San Francisco: Chronicle, 1993. N. pag. Print.
Works Cited
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